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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



4479
Diogenes Laertius, Lives Of The Philosophers, 4.1


nanBOOK 4: 1. SPEUSIPPUSThe foregoing is the best account of Plato that we were able to compile after a diligent examination of the authorities. He was succeeded by Speusippus, an Athenian and son of Eurymedon, who belonged to the deme of Myrrhinus, and was the son of Plato's sister Potone. He was head of the school for eight years beginning in the 108th Olympiad. He set up statues of the Graces in the shrine of the Muses erected by Plato in the Academy. He adhered faithfully to Plato's doctrines. In character, however, he was unlike him, being prone to anger and easily overcome by pleasures. At any rate there is a story that in a fit of passion he flung his favourite dog into the well, and that pleasure was the sole motive for his journey to Macedonia to be present at the wedding-feast of Casander.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

22 results
1. Hebrew Bible, Exodus, 3.15 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

3.15. וַיֹּאמֶר עוֹד אֱלֹהִים אֶל־מֹשֶׁה כֹּה־תֹאמַר אֶל־בְּנֵי יִשְׂרָאֵל יְהוָה אֱלֹהֵי אֲבֹתֵיכֶם אֱלֹהֵי אַבְרָהָם אֱלֹהֵי יִצְחָק וֵאלֹהֵי יַעֲקֹב שְׁלָחַנִי אֲלֵיכֶם זֶה־שְּׁמִי לְעֹלָם וְזֶה זִכְרִי לְדֹר דֹּר׃ 3.15. And God said moreover unto Moses: ‘Thus shalt thou say unto the children of Israel: The LORD, the God of your fathers, the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob, hath sent me unto you; this is My name for ever, and this is My memorial unto all generations."
2. Hesiod, Theogony, 908-909, 907 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

907. Something beyond all help would have that day
3. Plato, Phaedrus, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

275d. written words are of any use except to remind him who knows the matter about which they are written. Phaedrus. Very true. Socrates. Writing, Phaedrus, has this strange quality, and is very like painting; for the creatures of painting stand like living beings, but if one asks them a question, they preserve a solemn silence. And so it is with written words; you might think they spoke as if they had intelligence, but if you question them, wishing to know about their sayings, they always say only one and the same thing. And every word, when
4. Plato, Timaeus, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

70a. as if to fence off two separate chambers, for men and for women—by placing the midriff between them as a screen. That part of the soul, then, which partakes of courage and spirit, since it is a lover of victory, they planted more near to the head, between the midriff and the neck, in order that it might hearken to the reason, and, in conjunction therewith, might forcibly subdue the tribe of the desires whensoever they should utterly refuse to yield willing obedience to the word of command from the citadel of reason. And the heart
5. Xenophon, On Household Management, 3.10-3.12, 3.14, 7.18-7.19, 7.22 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

3.10. Would you have me break in colts, Socrates ? of course not, no more than I would have you buy children to train as agricultural labourers; but horses and human beings alike, I think, on reaching a certain age forthwith become useful and go on improving. I can also show you that husbands differ widely in their treatment of their wives, and some succeed in winning their co-operation and thereby increase their estates, while others bring utter ruin on their houses by their behaviour to them. 3.11. And ought one to blame the husband or the wife for that, Socrates ? When a sheep is ailing, said Socrates , we generally blame the shepherd, and when a horse is vicious, we generally find fault with his rider. In the case of a wife, if she receives instruction in the right way from her husband and yet does badly, perhaps she should bear the blame; but if the husband does not instruct his wife in the right way of doing things, and so finds her ignorant, should he not bear the blame himself? 3.12. Anyhow, Critobulus, you should tell us the truth, for we are all friends here. Is there anyone to whom you commit more affairs of importance than you commit to your wife? There is not. Is there anyone with whom you talk less? There are few or none, I confess. 3.14. But what of the husbands who, as you say, have good wives, Socrates ? Did they train them themselves? There’s nothing like investigation. I will introduce Aspasia to you, and she will explain the whole matter to you with more knowledge than I possess. 7.18. For it seems to me, dear, that the gods with great discernment have coupled together male and female, as they are called, chiefly in order that they may form a perfect partnership in mutual service. 7.19. For, in the first place, that the various species of living creatures may not fail, they are joined in wedlock for the production of children. Secondly, offspring to support them in old age is provided by this union, to human beings, at any rate. Thirdly, human beings live not in the open air, like beasts, but obviously need shelter. 7.22. And since both the indoor and the outdoor tasks demand labour and attention, God from the first adapted the woman’s nature, I think, to the indoor and man’s to the outdoor tasks and cares.
6. Aristotle, Nicomachean Ethics, None (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

7. Philo of Alexandria, On The Migration of Abraham, 31 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

31. How then should any good thing be wanting when the all-accomplishing God is at all times present with his graces, which are his virgin daughters, which he, the Father, who begot them, always cherishes as virgins, free from all impure contact and pollution? Then all cares, and labours, and exercises of practice, have a respite; and everything that is useful is at the same time given to everybody without the employment of art, by the prescient care of nature;
8. Philo of Alexandria, On The Posterity of Cain, 32 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

32. Having, therefore, now pointed out each variety, the tranquillity of the good man, and the state of agitation in which the bad man lives, let us now consider what follows the statement which we have hitherto been examining. For Moses says that Nod, which name, being interpreted, means the tumult into which the soul has migrated, is opposite to Eden. Now Eden is a symbolical expression for correct and divine reason, on which account its interpretation is luxury; because divine reason is, above all other things, delighted with and exults among unmingled and pure, and also well filled up and complete pleasure, God, the giver of all good things, raising his virgin and undying graces upon it. But by its own intrinsic nature, the bad is always striving with the good, the unjust with the just, the wise with the foolish, and all the different species of virtue with all the different species of vice. Something like this is the meaning of the statement that Nod is opposite to Eden. XI.
9. Philo of Alexandria, On The Life of Moses, 2.7 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

2.7. Therefore the connection of these four powers is beautiful and harmonious, for being all connected together and united one to another, they unite in concert, receiving and imparting a reciprocity of benefits from and to one another, imitating the virgin graces with whom it is an immutable law of their nature that they cannot be disunited, with respect to whom one might fairly say, what is habitually said of the virtues, that he who has one has them all.
10. Juvenal, Satires, 6.434-6.456 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

11. Musonius Rufus, Dissertationum A Lucio Digestarum Reliquiae, 3 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

12. New Testament, 1 Peter, 3.1 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

3.1. In like manner, wives, be in subjection to your own husbands; so that, even if any don't obey the Word, they may be won by the behavior of their wives without a word;
13. New Testament, Galatians, 3.28 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

3.28. There is neither Jewnor Greek, there is neither slave nor free man, there is neither malenor female; for you are all one in Christ Jesus.
14. New Testament, Luke, 8.1-8.3, 10.38-10.42 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

8.1. It happened soon afterwards, that he went about through cities and villages, preaching and bringing the good news of the Kingdom of God. With him were the twelve 8.2. and certain women who had been healed of evil spirits and infirmities: Mary who was called Magdalene, from whom seven demons had gone out; 8.3. and Joanna, the wife of Chuzas, Herod's steward; Susanna; and many others; who ministered to them from their possessions. 10.38. It happened as they went on their way, he entered into a certain village, and a certain woman named Martha received him into her house. 10.39. She had a sister called Mary, who also sat at Jesus' feet, and heard his word. 10.40. But Martha was distracted with much serving, and she came up to him, and said, "Lord, don't you care that my sister left me to serve alone? Ask her therefore to help me. 10.41. Jesus answered her, "Martha, Martha, you are anxious and troubled about many things 10.42. but one thing is needed. Mary has chosen the good part, which will not be taken away from her.
15. New Testament, Mark, 15.40-15.41 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

15.40. There were also women watching from afar, among whom were both Mary Magdalene, and Mary the mother of James the less and of Joses, and Salome; 15.41. who, when he was in Galilee, followed him, and served him; and many other women who came up with him to Jerusalem.
16. Seneca The Younger, De Beneficiis, 1.3.4-1.3.5 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

17. Clement of Alexandria, Miscellanies, 2.22.133 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

18. Numenius of Apamea, Fragments, 24 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

19. Numenius of Apamea, Fragments, 24 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

20. Diogenes Laertius, Lives of The Philosophers, 4.2 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

4.2. It was said that among those who attended his lectures were the two women who had been pupils of Plato, Lastheneia of Mantinea and Axiothea of Phlius. And at the time Dionysius in a letter says derisively, We may judge of your wisdom by the Arcadian girl who is your pupil. And, whereas Plato exempted from fees all who came to him, you levy tribute on them and collect it whether they will or no. According to Diodorus in the first book of his Memorabilia, Speusippus was the first to discern the common element in all studies and to bring them into connexion with each other so far as that was possible.
21. Eusebius of Caesarea, Preparation For The Gospel, 14.5.1 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

22. Simplicius of Cilicia, In Aristotelis Physicorum Libros Commentaria, 151.6-151.11 (missingth cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
academy Erler et al., Authority and Authoritative Texts in the Platonist Tradition (2021) 44
antiochus of ascalon Erler et al., Authority and Authoritative Texts in the Platonist Tradition (2021) 60
archytas Erler et al., Authority and Authoritative Texts in the Platonist Tradition (2021) 15, 44
aristotle Erler et al., Authority and Authoritative Texts in the Platonist Tradition (2021) 44, 60
dyad (of platos unwritten doctrines) Erler et al., Authority and Authoritative Texts in the Platonist Tradition (2021) 15
forms Erler et al., Authority and Authoritative Texts in the Platonist Tradition (2021) 15
founder Erler et al., Authority and Authoritative Texts in the Platonist Tradition (2021) 15, 44
galen Erler et al., Authority and Authoritative Texts in the Platonist Tradition (2021) 15
gender Keener, First-Second Corinthians (2005) 119
gomorrah, the graces Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 195
hermias of alexandria Erler et al., Authority and Authoritative Texts in the Platonist Tradition (2021) 60
kimon, career, descendants Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 273
learning and teaching, abraham associated with Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 195
learning and teaching Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 195
lyceum Erler et al., Authority and Authoritative Texts in the Platonist Tradition (2021) 44
mosaic of the philosophers Erler et al., Authority and Authoritative Texts in the Platonist Tradition (2021) 44, 60
myth Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 195
name, change of Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 273
name, of ships Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 273
name, of women Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 273
name Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 273
nature, isaac and Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 195
nothos, disputes Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 273
numenius Erler et al., Authority and Authoritative Texts in the Platonist Tradition (2021) 60
one, platos unwritten doctrines Erler et al., Authority and Authoritative Texts in the Platonist Tradition (2021) 15
philolaus Erler et al., Authority and Authoritative Texts in the Platonist Tradition (2021) 15
philosophy' Keener, First-Second Corinthians (2005) 119
platonic dialogues, phaedrus Erler et al., Authority and Authoritative Texts in the Platonist Tradition (2021) 60
practice, jacob and Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 195
practice Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 195
protagoras Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 195
pythagoreanism Erler et al., Authority and Authoritative Texts in the Platonist Tradition (2021) 15, 60
pythagoreans Erler et al., Authority and Authoritative Texts in the Platonist Tradition (2021) 15
simplicius Erler et al., Authority and Authoritative Texts in the Platonist Tradition (2021) 15
sons Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 273
soul, tripartite Erler et al., Authority and Authoritative Texts in the Platonist Tradition (2021) 44
speusippus Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 195; Erler et al., Authority and Authoritative Texts in the Platonist Tradition (2021) 15, 44, 60
system Erler et al., Authority and Authoritative Texts in the Platonist Tradition (2021) 60
themistokles, family Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 273
triads, second Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 195
xenocrates Erler et al., Authority and Authoritative Texts in the Platonist Tradition (2021) 15, 60
zeus Erler et al., Authority and Authoritative Texts in the Platonist Tradition (2021) 15