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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



4479
Diogenes Laertius, Lives Of The Philosophers, 1.17
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

9 results
1. Cicero, Lucullus, 70 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2. Tosefta, Sanhedrin, 7.8 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

3. Clement of Alexandria, Miscellanies, 7.17.108 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

4. Gellius, Attic Nights, 15.2.2, 15.2.5 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

5. Justin, Dialogue With Trypho, 1.2, 2.1-2.2, 2.4, 2.6, 3.3, 5.6 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

6. Philostratus The Athenian, Life of Apollonius, 1.7 (2nd cent. CE

1.7. ON reaching the age when children are taught their letters, he showed great strength of memory and power of application; and his tongue affected the Attic dialect, nor was his accent corrupted by the race he lived among. All eyes were turned upon him, for he was, moreover, conspicuous for his beauty. When he reached his fourteenth year, his father brought him to Tarsus, to Euthydemus the teacher from Phoenicia. Now Euthydemus was a good rhetor, and began his education; but, though he was attached to his teacher, he found the atmosphere of the city harsh and strange and little conducive to the philosophic life, for nowhere are men more addicted than here to luxury; jesters and full of insolence are they all; and they attend more to their fine linen than the Athenians did to wisdom; and a stream called the Cydnus runs through their city, along the banks of which they sit like so many water-fowl. Hence the words which Apollonius addresses to them in his letter: Be done with getting drunk upon your water. He therefore transferred his teacher, with his father's consent, to the town of Aegae, which was close by, where he found a peace congenial to one who would be a philosopher, and a more serious school of study and a sanctuary of Asclepius, where that god reveals himself in person to men. There he had as his companions in philosophy followers of Plato and Chrysippus and peripatetic philosophers. And he diligently attended also to the discourses of Epicurus, for he did not despise these either, although it was to those of Pythagoras that he applied himself with unspeakable wisdom and ardor. However, his teacher of the Pythagorean system was not a very serious person, nor one who practiced in his conduct the philosophy he taught; for he was the slave of his belly and appetites, and modeled himself upon Epicurus. And this man was Euxenus from the town of Heraclea in Pontus, and he knew the principles of Pythagoras just as birds know what they learn from men; for the birds will wish you farewell, and say Good day or Zeus help you, and such like, without understanding what they say and without any real sympathy for mankind, merely because they have been trained to move their tongue in a certain manner. Apollonius, however, was like the young eagles who, as long as they are not fully fledged, fly alongside of their parents and are trained by them in flight, but who, as soon as they are able to rise in the air, outsoar the parent birds, especially when they perceive the latter to be greedy and to be flying along the ground in order to snuff the quarry; like them Apollonius attended Euxenus as long as he was a child and was guided by him in the path of argument, but when he reached his sixteenth year he indulged his impulse towards the life of Pythagoras, being fledged and winged thereto by some higher power. Notwithstanding he did not cease to love Euxenus, nay, he persuaded his father to present him with a villa outside the town, where there were tender groves and fountains, and he said to him: Now you live there your own life, but I will live that of Pythagoras.
7. Diogenes Laertius, Lives of The Philosophers, 1.18-1.19, 2.130, 5.37 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

2.130. The tyrant having replied to this by saying that on this day he had the leisure to hear philosophers, he pressed the point still more stubbornly, declaring, while the feast was going on, that any and every occasion should be employed in listening to philosophers. The consequence was that, if a certain flute-player had not got them away, they would have been put to death. Hence when they were in a storm in the boat Asclepiades is reported to have said that the fluteplayer through good playing had proved their salvation when the free speech of Menedemus had been their undoing.He shirked work, it is said, and was indifferent to the fortunes of his school. At least no order could be seen in his classes, and no circle of benches; but each man would listen where he happened to be, walking or sitting, Menedemus himself behaving in the same way. 5.37. Furthermore, he was ever ready to do a kindness and fond of discussion. Casander certainly granted him audience and Ptolemy made overtures to him. And so highly was he valued at Athens that, when Agnonides ventured to prosecute him for impiety, the prosecutor himself narrowly escaped punishment. About 2000 pupils used to attend his lectures. In a letter to Phanias the Peripatetic, among other topics, he speaks of a tribunal as follows: To get a public or even a select circle such as one desires is not easy. If an author reads his work, he must re-write it. Always to shirk revision and ignore criticism is a course which the present generation of pupils will no longer tolerate. And in this letter he has called some one pedant.
8. Eusebius of Caesarea, Ecclesiastical History, 4.18.6 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

4.18.6. He composed also a dialogue against the Jews, which he held in the city of Ephesus with Trypho, a most distinguished man among the Hebrews of that day. In it he shows how the divine grace urged him on to the doctrine of the faith, and with what earnestness he had formerly pursued philosophical studies, and how ardent a search he had made for the truth.
9. Iamblichus, Life of Pythagoras, 24.107, 28.150 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
amphitryon Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 166
aristotelianism, as school Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 45
basilides Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 269
clement of alexandria, relationship between sects and philosophy Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 269
cupid Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 166
epicureanism, as school or sect Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 43, 269
faunus Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 166
hades Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 166
hairesis, as referring to philosophical schools Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 43, 44, 45
hairesis, pre-christian use Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 43, 44, 45
hairesis Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 45
herdsman, as psychopomp Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 166
hermes, and comedy Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 166
hermes, as go-between Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 166
horace, odes Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 166
horace Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 166
martyr, justin, naming sects Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 43, 44, 45
mercury/hermes, in horace Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 166
mercury/hermes, in plautus Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 166
ophites Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 269
philosophical schools, prohibitions upon entering Cohen, The Significance of Yavneh and other Essays in Jewish Hellenism (2010) 85
philosophy, distinguished from sects Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 269
philosophy, origin of notion of αἵρεσις Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 43, 44, 45
platonism, as a label Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 43, 44, 45
platonism, middle platonism Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 45
plautus Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 166
prometheus Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 166
pythagoreans Cohen, The Significance of Yavneh and other Essays in Jewish Hellenism (2010) 85
roman comedy Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 166
schools' Cohen, The Significance of Yavneh and other Essays in Jewish Hellenism (2010) 85
simonians (sect) Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 269
stoicism, notion of a stoic school or αἵρεσις Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 45, 269
διατριβή Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 45