Home About Network of subjects Linked subjects heatmap Book indices included Search by subject Search by reference Browse subjects Browse texts

Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



4479
Diogenes Laertius, Lives Of The Philosophers, 1.15
NaN


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

8 results
1. Aristophanes, Birds, 1574 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1574. ἄγε δὴ τί δρῶμεν ̔Ηράκλεις; ἀκήκοας
2. Dio Chrysostom, Orations, 1.84, 8.20, 8.26, 9.12 (1st cent. CE

8.20.  "But there is another battle more terrible and a struggle not slight but much greater than this and fraught with greater danger, I mean the fight against pleasure. Nor is it like that battle which Homer speaks of when he says, Fiercely then around the ships The struggle was renewed. With halberds and with trenchant battle-axe They fought, with mighty sword and two-edged spear. 8.26.  For pleasure, after overpowering and taking possession of her victims, delivers them over to hardships, the most hateful and most difficult to endure. "This is the contest which I steadfastly maintain, and in which I risk my life against pleasure and hardship, yet not a single wretched mortal gives heed to me, but only to the jumpers and runners and dancers. 9.12.  but more difficult in every way — I mean poverty, exile, and disrepute; yes, and anger, pain, desire, fear, and the most redoubtable beast of all, treacherous and cowardly, I mean pleasure, which no Greek or barbarian can claim he fights and conquers by the strength of his soul, but all alike have succumbed to her and have failed in this contest — Persians, Medes, Syrians, Macedonians, Athenians, Lacedaemonians — all, that is, save myself.
3. Epictetus, Discourses, 1.6.32 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

4. Mishnah, Avot, 1 (1st cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

5. New Testament, 1 Corinthians, 15.32 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

15.32. If I fought withanimals at Ephesus for human purposes, what does it profit me? If thedead are not raised, then "let us eat and drink, for tomorrow we die.
6. Lucian, Philosophies For Sale, 8 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

7. Sextus, Outlines of Pyrrhonism, 1.209-1.241 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

8. Diogenes Laertius, Lives of The Philosophers, 1.13-1.14, 1.16, 6.13, 9.5, 9.20-9.21, 9.61, 9.67-9.69, 9.71-9.73 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

6.13. Wisdom is a most sure stronghold which never crumbles away nor is betrayed. Walls of defence must be constructed in our own impregnable reasonings. He used to converse in the gymnasium of Cynosarges (White hound) at no great distance from the gates, and some think that the Cynic school derived its name from Cynosarges. Antisthenes himself too was nicknamed a hound pure and simple. And he was the first, Diocles tells us, to double his cloak and be content with that one garment and to take up a staff and a wallet. Neanthes too asserts that he was the first to double his mantle. Sosicrates, however, in the third book of his Successions of Philosophers says this was first done by Diodorus of Aspendus, who also let his beard grow and used a staff and a wallet. 9.5. He was exceptional from his boyhood; for when a youth he used to say that he knew nothing, although when he was grown up he claimed that he knew everything. He was nobody's pupil, but he declared that he inquired of himself, and learned everything from himself. Some, however, had said that he had been a pupil of Xenophanes, as we learn from Sotion, who also tells us that Ariston in his book On Heraclitus declares that he was cured of the dropsy and died of another disease. And Hippobotus has the same story.As to the work which passes as his, it is a continuous treatise On Nature, but is divided into three discourses, one on the universe, another on politics, and a third on theology. 9.20. He also said that the mass of things falls short of thought; and again that our encounters with tyrants should be as few, or else as pleasant, as possible. When Empedocles remarked to him that it is impossible to find a wise man, Naturally, he replied, for it takes a wise man to recognize a wise man. Sotion says that he was the first to maintain that all things are incognizable, but Sotion is in error.One of his poems is The Founding of Colophon, and another The Settlement of a Colony at Elea in Italy, making 2000 lines in all. He flourished about the 60th Olympiad. That he buried his sons with his own hands like Anaxagoras is stated by Demetrius of Phalerum in his work On Old Age and by Panaetius the Stoic in his book of Cheerfulness. He is believed to have been sold into slavery by [... and to have been set free by] the Pythagoreans Parmeniscus and Orestades: so Favorinus in the first book of his Memorabilia. There was also another Xenophanes, of Lesbos, an iambic poet.Such were the sporadic philosophers. 9.21. 3. PARMENIDESParmenides, a native of Elea, son of Pyres, was a pupil of Xenophanes (Theophrastus in his Epitome makes him a pupil of Anaximander). Parmenides, however, though he was instructed by Xenophanes, was no follower of his. According to Sotion he also associated with Ameinias the Pythagorean, who was the son of Diochaetas and a worthy gentleman though poor. This Ameinias he was more inclined to follow, and on his death he built a shrine to him, being himself of illustrious birth and possessed of great wealth; moreover it was Ameinias and not Xenophanes who led him to adopt the peaceful life of a student.He was the first to declare that the earth is spherical and is situated in the centre of the universe. He held that there were two elements, fire and earth, and that the former discharged the function of a craftsman, the latter of his material. 9.61. 11. PYRRHOPyrrho of Elis was the son of Pleistarchus, as Diocles relates. According to Apollodorus in his Chronology, he was first a painter; then he studied under Stilpo's son Bryson: thus Alexander in his Successions of Philosophers. Afterwards he joined Anaxarchus, whom he accompanied on his travels everywhere so that he even forgathered with the Indian Gymnosophists and with the Magi. This led him to adopt a most noble philosophy, to quote Ascanius of Abdera, taking the form of agnosticism and suspension of judgement. He denied that anything was honourable or dishonourable, just or unjust. And so, universally, he held that there is nothing really existent, but custom and convention govern human action; for no single thing is in itself any more this than that. 9.67. They say that, when septic salves and surgical and caustic remedies were applied to a wound he had sustained, he did not so much as frown. Timon also portrays his disposition in the full account which he gives of him to Pytho. Philo of Athens, a friend of his, used to say that he was most fond of Democritus, and then of Homer, admiring him and continually repeating the lineAs leaves on trees, such is the life of man.He also admired Homer because he likened men to wasps, flies, and birds, and would quote these verses as well:Ay, friend, die thou; why thus thy fate deplore?Patroclus too, thy better, is no more,and all the passages which dwell on the unstable purpose, vain pursuits, and childish folly of man. 9.68. Posidonius, too, relates of him a story of this sort. When his fellow-passengers on board a ship were all unnerved by a storm, he kept calm and confident, pointing to a little pig in the ship that went on eating, and telling them that such was the unperturbed state in which the wise man should keep himself. Numenius alone attributes to him positive tenets. He had pupils of repute, in particular one Eurylochus, who fell short of his professions; for they say that he was once so angry that he seized the spit with the meat on it and chased his cook right into the market-place. 9.69. Once in Elis he was so hard pressed by his pupils' questions that he stripped and swam across the Alpheus. Now he was, as Timon too says, most hostile to Sophists.Philo, again, who had a habit of very often talking to himself, is also referred to in the lines:Yea, him that is far away from men, at leisure to himself,Philo, who recks not of opinion or of wrangling.Besides these, Pyrrho's pupils included Hecataeus of Abdera, Timon of Phlius, author of the Silli, of whom more anon, and also Nausiphanes of Teos, said by some to have been a teacher of Epicurus. All these were called Pyrrhoneans after the name of their master, but Aporetics, Sceptics, Ephectics, and even Zetetics, from their principles, if we may call them such — 9.71. Some call Homer the founder of this school, for to the same questions he more than anyone else is always giving different answers at different times, and is never definite or dogmatic about the answer. The maxims of the Seven Wise Men, too, they call sceptical; for instance, Observe the Golden Mean, and A pledge is a curse at one's elbow, meaning that whoever plights his troth steadfastly and trustfully brings a curse on his own head. Sceptically minded, again, were Archilochus and Euripides, for Archilochus says:Man's soul, O Glaucus, son of Leptines,Is but as one short day that Zeus sends down.And Euripides:Great God! how can they say poor mortal menHave minds and think? Hang we not on thy will?Do we not what it pleaseth thee to wish? 9.72. Furthermore, they find Xenophanes, Zeno of Elea, and Democritus to be sceptics: Xenophanes because he says,Clear truth hath no man seen nor e'er shall knowand Zeno because he would destroy motion, saying, A moving body moves neither where it is nor where it is not; Democritus because he rejects qualities, saying, Opinion says hot or cold, but the reality is atoms and empty space, and again, of a truth we know nothing, for truth is in a well. Plato, too, leaves the truth to gods and sons of gods, and seeks after the probable explanation. Euripides says: 9.73. Who knoweth if to die be but to live,And that called life by mortals be but death?So too Empedocles:So to these mortal may not list nor lookNor yet conceive them in his mind;and before that:Each believes naught but his experience.And even Heraclitus: Let us not conjecture on deepest questions what is likely. Then again Hippocrates showed himself two-sided and but human. And before them all Homer:Pliant is the tongue of mortals; numberless the tales within it;andAmple is of words the pasture, hither thither widely ranging;andAnd the saying which thou sayest, back it cometh later on thee,where he is speaking of the equal value of contradictory sayings.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
academy Vogt, Pyrrhonian Skepticism in Diogenes Laertius (2015) 112
aenesidemus Vogt, Pyrrhonian Skepticism in Diogenes Laertius (2015) 75, 112
alexandria Vogt, Pyrrhonian Skepticism in Diogenes Laertius (2015) 112
allegory/allegorization Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 45
anaxarchus Vogt, Pyrrhonian Skepticism in Diogenes Laertius (2015) 105
antisthenes Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 45
archilochus Vogt, Pyrrhonian Skepticism in Diogenes Laertius (2015) 110
beast, passions as Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 45
cynics/cynicism, heracles as model Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 45
cynics/cynicism Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 45
democritus Vogt, Pyrrhonian Skepticism in Diogenes Laertius (2015) 105, 110
diogenes, the cynic Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 45
diogenes laertius Vogt, Pyrrhonian Skepticism in Diogenes Laertius (2015) 75, 105, 110, 112
empedocles Vogt, Pyrrhonian Skepticism in Diogenes Laertius (2015) 110
epicureanism Vogt, Pyrrhonian Skepticism in Diogenes Laertius (2015) 105
epicurus Vogt, Pyrrhonian Skepticism in Diogenes Laertius (2015) 105
euripides Vogt, Pyrrhonian Skepticism in Diogenes Laertius (2015) 110
hardships Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 45
heracles/hercules Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 45
heraclitus Vogt, Pyrrhonian Skepticism in Diogenes Laertius (2015) 75, 110, 112
homer Vogt, Pyrrhonian Skepticism in Diogenes Laertius (2015) 105, 110
indifference Vogt, Pyrrhonian Skepticism in Diogenes Laertius (2015) 105
lists Bickerman and Tropper, Studies in Jewish and Christian History (2007) 537
moralists Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 45
nausiphanes Vogt, Pyrrhonian Skepticism in Diogenes Laertius (2015) 105
oral law Bickerman and Tropper, Studies in Jewish and Christian History (2007) 537
parmenides Vogt, Pyrrhonian Skepticism in Diogenes Laertius (2015) 75
paul Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 45
pharisees Bickerman and Tropper, Studies in Jewish and Christian History (2007) 537
pherecydes Vogt, Pyrrhonian Skepticism in Diogenes Laertius (2015) 105
philo of athens Vogt, Pyrrhonian Skepticism in Diogenes Laertius (2015) 105
philosophers Bickerman and Tropper, Studies in Jewish and Christian History (2007) 537
phoenicians Bickerman and Tropper, Studies in Jewish and Christian History (2007) 537
plato Vogt, Pyrrhonian Skepticism in Diogenes Laertius (2015) 110
pyrrho Vogt, Pyrrhonian Skepticism in Diogenes Laertius (2015) 75, 105
pyrrhonism Vogt, Pyrrhonian Skepticism in Diogenes Laertius (2015) 75, 105, 112
pyrrhonists Vogt, Pyrrhonian Skepticism in Diogenes Laertius (2015) 112
pythagoras Vogt, Pyrrhonian Skepticism in Diogenes Laertius (2015) 105
pythagoras and pythagoreans Bickerman and Tropper, Studies in Jewish and Christian History (2007) 537
reality Vogt, Pyrrhonian Skepticism in Diogenes Laertius (2015) 110
rome, law Bickerman and Tropper, Studies in Jewish and Christian History (2007) 537
schools Bickerman and Tropper, Studies in Jewish and Christian History (2007) 537
seven sages Bickerman and Tropper, Studies in Jewish and Christian History (2007) 537; Vogt, Pyrrhonian Skepticism in Diogenes Laertius (2015) 110
sextus empiricus Vogt, Pyrrhonian Skepticism in Diogenes Laertius (2015) 75, 105, 110
shechemites Bickerman and Tropper, Studies in Jewish and Christian History (2007) 537
skepticism, academic skepticism Vogt, Pyrrhonian Skepticism in Diogenes Laertius (2015) 112
skepticism, pyrrhonian skepticism Vogt, Pyrrhonian Skepticism in Diogenes Laertius (2015) 105
skepticism Vogt, Pyrrhonian Skepticism in Diogenes Laertius (2015) 110, 112
socrates Bickerman and Tropper, Studies in Jewish and Christian History (2007) 537
sotion Vogt, Pyrrhonian Skepticism in Diogenes Laertius (2015) 112
stoicism Bickerman and Tropper, Studies in Jewish and Christian History (2007) 537
timon Vogt, Pyrrhonian Skepticism in Diogenes Laertius (2015) 75
tranquility Vogt, Pyrrhonian Skepticism in Diogenes Laertius (2015) 105
tyrant Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 45
vice' Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 45
xenophanes Vogt, Pyrrhonian Skepticism in Diogenes Laertius (2015) 75, 105, 110, 112
zeno Bickerman and Tropper, Studies in Jewish and Christian History (2007) 537
zeno of elea Vogt, Pyrrhonian Skepticism in Diogenes Laertius (2015) 110
zoroaster Bickerman and Tropper, Studies in Jewish and Christian History (2007) 537