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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



4479
Diogenes Laertius, Lives Of The Philosophers, 1.109-1.112


nan10. EPIMEDESEpimenides, according to Theopompus and many other writers, was the son of Phaestius; some, however, make him the son of Dosiadas, others of Agesarchus. He was a native of Cnossos in Crete, though from wearing his hair long he did not look like a Cretan. One day he was sent into the country by his father to look for a stray sheep, and at noon he turned aside out of the way, and went to sleep in a cave, where he slept for fifty-seven years. After this he got up and went in search of the sheep, thinking he had been asleep only a short time. And when he could not find it, he came to the farm, and found everything changed and another owner in possession. Then he went back to the town in utter perplexity; and there, on entering his own house, he fell in with people who wanted to know who he was. At length he found his younger brother, now an old man, and learnt the truth from him.


nanSo he became famous throughout Greece, and was believed to be a special favourite of heaven.Hence, when the Athenians were attacked by pestilence, and the Pythian priestess bade them purify the city, they sent a ship commanded by Nicias, son of Niceratus, to Crete to ask the help of Epimenides. And he came in the 46th Olympiad, purified their city, and stopped the pestilence in the following way. He took sheep, some black and others white, and brought them to the Areopagus; and there he let them go whither they pleased, instructing those who followed them to mark the spot where each sheep lay down and offer a sacrifice to the local divinity. And thus, it is said, the plague was stayed. Hence even to this day altars may be found in different parts of Attica with no name inscribed upon them, which are memorials of this atonement. According to some writers he declared the plague to have been caused by the pollution which Cylon brought on the city and showed them how to remove it. In consequence two young men, Cratinus and Ctesibius, were put to death and the city was delivered from the scourge.


nanThe Athenians voted him a talent in money and a ship to convey him back to Crete. The money he declined, but he concluded a treaty of friendship and alliance between Cnossos and Athens.So he returned home and soon afterwards died. According to Phlegon in his work On Longevity he lived one hundred and fifty-seven years; according to the Cretans two hundred and ninety-nine years. Xenophanes of Colophon gives his age as 154, according to hearsay.He wrote a poem On the Birth of the Curetes and Corybantes and a Theogony, 5000 lines in all; another on the building of the Argo and Jason's voyage to Colchis in 6500 lines.


nanHe also compiled prose works On Sacrifices and the Cretan Constitution, also On Minos and Rhadamanthus, running to about 4000 lines. At Athens again he founded the sanctuary of the Solemn Gods (Semnai Theai), as Lobon of Argos tells us in his work On Poets. He is stated to have been the first who purified houses and fields, and the first who founded sanctuaries. Some are found to maintain that he did not go to sleep but withdrew himself for a while, engaged in gathering simples.There is extant a letter of his to Solon the lawgiver, containing a scheme of government which Minos drew up for the Cretans. But Demetrius of Magnesia, in his work on poets and writers of the same name, endeavours to discredit the letter on the ground that it is late and not written in the Cretan dialect but in Attic, and New Attic too. However, I have found another letter by him which runs as follows:Epimenides to Solon


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

29 results
1. Hebrew Bible, Genesis, 2-3, 1 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

2. Hebrew Bible, Jonah, 4.6 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

4.6. וַיְמַן יְהוָה־אֱלֹהִים קִיקָיוֹן וַיַּעַל מֵעַל לְיוֹנָה לִהְיוֹת צֵל עַל־רֹאשׁוֹ לְהַצִּיל לוֹ מֵרָעָתוֹ וַיִּשְׂמַח יוֹנָה עַל־הַקִּיקָיוֹן שִׂמְחָה גְדוֹלָה׃ 4.6. And the LORD God prepared a gourd, and made it to come up over Jonah, that it might be a shadow over his head, to deliver him from his evil. So Jonah was exceeding glad because of the gourd."
3. Hebrew Bible, Psalms, 8.4-8.6 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

8.4. כִּי־אֶרְאֶה שָׁמֶיךָ מַעֲשֵׂי אֶצְבְּעֹתֶיךָ יָרֵחַ וְכוֹכָבִים אֲשֶׁר כּוֹנָנְתָּה׃ 8.5. מָה־אֱנוֹשׁ כִּי־תִזְכְּרֶנּוּ וּבֶן־אָדָם כִּי תִפְקְדֶנּוּ׃ 8.6. וַתְּחַסְּרֵהוּ מְּעַט מֵאֱלֹהִים וְכָבוֹד וְהָדָר תְּעַטְּרֵהוּ׃ 8.4. When I behold Thy heavens, the work of Thy fingers, The moon and the stars, which Thou hast established;" 8.5. What is man, that Thou art mindful of him? And the son of man, that Thou thinkest of him?" 8.6. Yet Thou hast made him but little lower than the angels, And hast crowned him with glory and honour."
4. Hebrew Bible, 1 Kings, 4.25 (8th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

5. Hebrew Bible, Jeremiah, 24.1, 24.4-24.7, 25.11-25.12 (8th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

24.1. וְשִׁלַּחְתִּי בָם אֶת־הַחֶרֶב אֶת־הָרָעָב וְאֶת־הַדָּבֶר עַד־תֻּמָּם מֵעַל הָאֲדָמָה אֲשֶׁר־נָתַתִּי לָהֶם וְלַאֲבוֹתֵיהֶם׃ 24.1. הִרְאַנִי יְהוָה וְהִנֵּה שְׁנֵי דּוּדָאֵי תְאֵנִים מוּעָדִים לִפְנֵי הֵיכַל יְהוָה אַחֲרֵי הַגְלוֹת נְבוּכַדְרֶאצַּר מֶלֶךְ־בָּבֶל אֶת־יְכָנְיָהוּ בֶן־יְהוֹיָקִים מֶלֶךְ־יְהוּדָה וְאֶת־שָׂרֵי יְהוּדָה וְאֶת־הֶחָרָשׁ וְאֶת־הַמַּסְגֵּר מִירוּשָׁלִַם וַיְבִאֵם בָּבֶל׃ 24.4. וַיְהִי דְבַר־יְהוָה אֵלַי לֵאמֹר׃ 24.5. כֹּה־אָמַר יְהוָה אֱלֹהֵי יִשְׂרָאֵל כַּתְּאֵנִים הַטֹּבוֹת הָאֵלֶּה כֵּן־אַכִּיר אֶת־גָּלוּת יְהוּדָה אֲשֶׁר שִׁלַּחְתִּי מִן־הַמָּקוֹם הַזֶּה אֶרֶץ כַּשְׂדִּים לְטוֹבָה׃ 24.6. וְשַׂמְתִּי עֵינִי עֲלֵיהֶם לְטוֹבָה וַהֲשִׁבֹתִים עַל־הָאָרֶץ הַזֹּאת וּבְנִיתִים וְלֹא אֶהֱרֹס וּנְטַעְתִּים וְלֹא אֶתּוֹשׁ׃ 24.7. וְנָתַתִּי לָהֶם לֵב לָדַעַת אֹתִי כִּי אֲנִי יְהוָה וְהָיוּ־לִי לְעָם וְאָנֹכִי אֶהְיֶה לָהֶם לֵאלֹהִים כִּי־יָשֻׁבוּ אֵלַי בְּכָל־לִבָּם׃ 25.11. וְהָיְתָה כָּל־הָאָרֶץ הַזֹּאת לְחָרְבָּה לְשַׁמָּה וְעָבְדוּ הַגּוֹיִם הָאֵלֶּה אֶת־מֶלֶךְ בָּבֶל שִׁבְעִים שָׁנָה׃ 25.12. וְהָיָה כִמְלֹאות שִׁבְעִים שָׁנָה אֶפְקֹד עַל־מֶלֶךְ־בָּבֶל וְעַל־הַגּוֹי הַהוּא נְאֻם־יְהוָה אֶת־עֲוֺנָם וְעַל־אֶרֶץ כַּשְׂדִּים וְשַׂמְתִּי אֹתוֹ לְשִׁמְמוֹת עוֹלָם׃ 24.1. The LORD showed me, and behold two baskets of figs set before the temple of the LORD; after that Nebuchadrezzar king of Babylon had carried away captive Jeconiah the son of Jehoiakim, king of Judah, and the princes of Judah, with the craftsmen and smiths, from Jerusalem, and had brought them to Babylon." 24.4. And the word of the LORD came unto me, saying:" 24.5. ’Thus saith the LORD, the God of Israel: Like these good figs, so will I regard the captives of Judah, whom I have sent out of this place into the land of the Chaldeans, for good." 24.6. And I will set Mine eyes upon them for good, and I will bring them back to this land; and I will build them, and not pull them down; and I will plant them, and not pluck them up." 24.7. And I will give them a heart to know Me, that I am the LORD; and they shall be My people, and I will be their God; for they shall return unto Me with their whole heart." 25.11. And this whole land shall be a desolation, and a waste; and these nations shall serve the king of Babylon seventy years." 25.12. And it shall come to pass, when seventy years are accomplished, that I will punish the king of Babylon, and that nation, saith the LORD, for their iniquity, and the land of the Chaldeans; and I will make it perpetual desolations."
6. Homer, Iliad, 5.896 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

5.896. /Howbeit I will no longer endure that thou shouldest be in pain, for thou art mine offspring, and it was to me that thy mother bare thee; but wert thou born of any other god, thus pestilent as thou art, then long ere this hadst thou been lower than the sons of heaven.
7. Parmenides, Fragments, None (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

8. Hebrew Bible, 2 Chronicles, 36.20-36.21 (5th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

36.21. לְמַלֹּאות דְּבַר־יְהוָה בְּפִי יִרְמְיָהוּ עַד־רָצְתָה הָאָרֶץ אֶת־שַׁבְּתוֹתֶיהָ כָּל־יְמֵי הָשַּׁמָּה שָׁבָתָה לְמַלֹּאות שִׁבְעִים שָׁנָה׃ 36.20. And them that had escaped from the sword carried he away to Babylon; and they were servants to him and his sons until the reign of the kingdom of Persia;" 36.21. to fulfil the word of the LORD by the mouth of Jeremiah, until the land had been paid her sabbaths; for as long as she lay desolate she kept sabbath, to fulfil threescore and ten years."
9. Hebrew Bible, Ezra, 6.15 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

6.15. וְשֵׁיצִיא בַּיְתָה דְנָה עַד יוֹם תְּלָתָה לִירַח אֲדָר דִּי־הִיא שְׁנַת־שֵׁת לְמַלְכוּת דָּרְיָוֶשׁ מַלְכָּא׃ 6.15. And this house was finished on the third day of the month Adar, which was in the sixth year of the reign of Darius the king."
10. Plato, Laws, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

11. Aratus Solensis, Phaenomena, 3-4, 2 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

2. ἄρρητον· μεσταὶ δέ Διὸς πᾶσαι μὲν ἀγυιαί
12. Aristotle, Athenian Constitution, 1.1 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

13. Aristotle, Physics, None (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

14. Hebrew Bible, Daniel, 9.2 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

9.2. בִּשְׁנַת אַחַת לְמָלְכוֹ אֲנִי דָּנִיֵּאל בִּינֹתִי בַּסְּפָרִים מִסְפַּר הַשָּׁנִים אֲשֶׁר הָיָה דְבַר־יְהוָה אֶל־יִרְמִיָה הַנָּבִיא לְמַלֹּאות לְחָרְבוֹת יְרוּשָׁלִַם שִׁבְעִים שָׁנָה׃ 9.2. וְעוֹד אֲנִי מְדַבֵּר וּמִתְפַּלֵּל וּמִתְוַדֶּה חַטָּאתִי וְחַטַּאת עַמִּי יִשְׂרָאֵל וּמַפִּיל תְּחִנָּתִי לִפְנֵי יְהוָה אֱלֹהַי עַל הַר־קֹדֶשׁ אֱלֹהָי׃ 9.2. in the first year of his reign I Daniel meditated in the books, over the number of the years, whereof the word of the LORD came to Jeremiah the prophet, that He would accomplish for the desolations of Jerusalem seventy years."
15. Septuagint, 1 Maccabees, 14.12 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

14.12. Each man sat under his vine and his fig tree,and there was none to make them afraid.
16. Anon., Sibylline Oracles, 2.280-2.281 (1st cent. BCE - 5th cent. CE)

2.280. 280 And then shall Uriel, mighty angel, break 2.281. The bolts of stern and lasting adamant
17. Anon., 2 Baruch, 77.18 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

18. Dio Chrysostom, Orations, 12.27 (1st cent. CE - missingth cent. CE)

12.27.  Now concerning the nature of the gods in general, and especially that of the ruler of the universe, first and foremost an idea regarding him and a conception of him common to the whole human race, to the Greeks and to the barbarians alike, a conception that is inevitable and innate in every creature endowed with reason, arising in the course of nature without the aid of human teacher and free from the deceit of any expounding priest, has made its way, and it rendered manifest God's kinship with man and furnished many evidences of the truth, which did not suffer the earliest and most ancient men to doze and grow indifferent to them;
19. Josephus Flavius, Jewish Antiquities, 20.233 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

20.233. But after the term of seventy years’ captivity under the Babylonians, Cyrus, king of Persia, sent the Jews from Babylon to their own land again, and gave them leave to rebuild their temple;
20. Josephus Flavius, Jewish War, 5.389 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

5.389. You are also acquainted with the slavery we were under at Babylon, where the people were captives for seventy years; yet were they not delivered into freedom again before God made Cyrus his gracious instrument in bringing it about; accordingly they were set free by him, and did again restore the worship of their Deliverer at his temple.
21. New Testament, Acts, 17.28-17.29 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

17.28. 'For in him we live, and move, and have our being.' As some of your own poets have said, 'For we are also his offspring.' 17.29. Being then the offspring of God, we ought not to think that the Divine Nature is like gold, or silver, or stone, engraved by art and device of man.
22. New Testament, Titus, 1.12 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

1.12. One of them, a prophet of their own, said, "Cretans are always liars, evil beasts, and idle gluttons.
23. New Testament, Matthew, 11.25 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

11.25. At that time, Jesus answered, "I thank you, Father, Lord of heaven and earth, that you hid these things from the wise and understanding, and revealed them to infants.
24. Pliny The Elder, Natural History, 7.175 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

25. Seneca The Younger, Letters, 41.1-41.2 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

26. Aelian, Nature of Animals, 12.7 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

27. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 1.14.4 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1.14.4. In front of this temple, where is also the statue of Triptolemus, is a bronze bull being led as it were to sacrifice, and there is a sitting figure of Epimenides of Cnossus fl. c. 600 B.C., who they say entered a cave in the country and slept. And the sleep did not leave him before the fortieth year, and afterwards he wrote verses and purified Athens and other cities. But Thales who stayed the plague for the Lacedaemonians was not related to Epimenides in any way, and belonged to a different city. The latter was from Cnossus, but Thales was from Gortyn, according to Polymnastus of Colophon, who com posed a poem about him for the Lacedaemonians.
28. Diogenes Laertius, Lives of The Philosophers, 1.110-1.112, 1.114 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

1.110. So he became famous throughout Greece, and was believed to be a special favourite of heaven.Hence, when the Athenians were attacked by pestilence, and the Pythian priestess bade them purify the city, they sent a ship commanded by Nicias, son of Niceratus, to Crete to ask the help of Epimenides. And he came in the 46th Olympiad, purified their city, and stopped the pestilence in the following way. He took sheep, some black and others white, and brought them to the Areopagus; and there he let them go whither they pleased, instructing those who followed them to mark the spot where each sheep lay down and offer a sacrifice to the local divinity. And thus, it is said, the plague was stayed. Hence even to this day altars may be found in different parts of Attica with no name inscribed upon them, which are memorials of this atonement. According to some writers he declared the plague to have been caused by the pollution which Cylon brought on the city and showed them how to remove it. In consequence two young men, Cratinus and Ctesibius, were put to death and the city was delivered from the scourge. 1.111. The Athenians voted him a talent in money and a ship to convey him back to Crete. The money he declined, but he concluded a treaty of friendship and alliance between Cnossos and Athens.So he returned home and soon afterwards died. According to Phlegon in his work On Longevity he lived one hundred and fifty-seven years; according to the Cretans two hundred and ninety-nine years. Xenophanes of Colophon gives his age as 154, according to hearsay.He wrote a poem On the Birth of the Curetes and Corybantes and a Theogony, 5000 lines in all; another on the building of the Argo and Jason's voyage to Colchis in 6500 lines. 1.112. He also compiled prose works On Sacrifices and the Cretan Constitution, also On Minos and Rhadamanthus, running to about 4000 lines. At Athens again he founded the sanctuary of the Solemn Gods (Semnai Theai), as Lobon of Argos tells us in his work On Poets. He is stated to have been the first who purified houses and fields, and the first who founded sanctuaries. Some are found to maintain that he did not go to sleep but withdrew himself for a while, engaged in gathering simples.There is extant a letter of his to Solon the lawgiver, containing a scheme of government which Minos drew up for the Cretans. But Demetrius of Magnesia, in his work on poets and writers of the same name, endeavours to discredit the letter on the ground that it is late and not written in the Cretan dialect but in Attic, and New Attic too. However, I have found another letter by him which runs as follows:Epimenides to Solon 1.114. This is the tenor of the letter. But Demetrius reports a story that he received from the Nymphs food of a special sort and kept it in a cow's hoof; that he took small doses of this food, which was entirely absorbed into his system, and he was never seen to eat. Timaeus mentions him in his second book. Some writers say that the Cretans sacrifice to him as a god; for they say that he had superhuman foresight. For instance, when he saw Munichia, at Athens, he said the Athenians did not know how many evils that place would bring upon them; for, if they did, they would destroy it even if they had to do so with their teeth. And this he said so long before the event. It is also stated that he was the first to call himself Aeacus; that he foretold to the Lacedaemonians their defeat by the Arcadians; and that he claimed that his soul had passed through many incarnations.
29. Anon., 4 Baruch, 3.14

3.14. And the Lord said to Jeremiah: Send him to the vineyard of Agrippa, and I will hide him in the shadow of the mountain until I cause the people to return to the city.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
abimelech/ebed-melech,sleep of Allison (2018) 213, 220, 222, 223, 225, 227, 228, 232, 236, 238, 246
abimelech/ebed-melech Allison (2018) 213, 220, 222, 223, 225, 227, 228, 232, 236, 238, 246
acts of the apostles Potter Suh and Holladay (2021) 633
agrippa ii,agrippa,vineyard/estate of Allison (2018) 222
agurtês /-ai Johnston and Struck (2005) 181
air (element) Iribarren and Koning (2022) 91
alcmeonids Johnston and Struck (2005) 181
angel Allison (2018) 228
anthropomorphism Iribarren and Koning (2022) 91
aratus,phaenomena Potter Suh and Holladay (2021) 633
aratus,zenos pupil Potter Suh and Holladay (2021) 633
areopagus speech,epimenides echoes Potter Suh and Holladay (2021) 633
areopagus speech Potter Suh and Holladay (2021) 633
aristeas of proconnesus Van der Horst (2014) 251
aristophanes,peace Johnston and Struck (2005) 181
aristophanes Johnston and Struck (2005) 181
aristotle,athenaiôn politeia Johnston and Struck (2005) 181
aristotle Johnston and Struck (2005) 181
athens,epimenidess rescue of Potter Suh and Holladay (2021) 633
athens,plague Potter Suh and Holladay (2021) 633
autobiography Iribarren and Koning (2022) 90, 91
bacis Johnston and Struck (2005) 181
biography/biographical Despotis and Lohr (2022) 231
chrêsmologos Johnston and Struck (2005) 181, 182
conversion,models/variations Despotis and Lohr (2022) 231
conversion,philosophical Despotis and Lohr (2022) 231
conversion,ritual Despotis and Lohr (2022) 231
cosmos/kosmos Iribarren and Koning (2022) 91
deity sculpture,sophisticated pagan view Potter Suh and Holladay (2021) 633
desire Despotis and Lohr (2022) 231
dikê/δίκη Iribarren and Koning (2022) 91
dikê (goddess) Iribarren and Koning (2022) 90, 91
dillery,john Johnston and Struck (2005) 181, 182
diogenes laertius Johnston and Struck (2005) 181, 182
disciple Despotis and Lohr (2022) 231
divination,and authority Johnston and Struck (2005) 181, 182
divination,and writing (see textualization) Johnston and Struck (2005) 182
education/educational Despotis and Lohr (2022) 231
epimenides Johnston and Struck (2005) 181, 182; Potter Suh and Holladay (2021) 633; Van der Horst (2014) 249, 250, 251
genre Iribarren and Koning (2022) 90, 91
god,offspring of,humans as Potter Suh and Holladay (2021) 633
god,proximity,pagan view Potter Suh and Holladay (2021) 633
herodotus Johnston and Struck (2005) 182
hexameter (poetry) Iribarren and Koning (2022) 90
idolatry,critique Potter Suh and Holladay (2021) 633
initiation Despotis and Lohr (2022) 231
katabasis Iribarren and Koning (2022) 90
kinship,god and humanity Potter Suh and Holladay (2021) 633
kinship with god,pagan notions Potter Suh and Holladay (2021) 633
liturgical expressions/elements,long-sleepers,legends of Allison (2018) 213, 220
long-sleepers Van der Horst (2014) 249, 250, 251
mania,poet as Johnston and Struck (2005) 181
mania Johnston and Struck (2005) 181, 182
miracle Allison (2018) 225
moses Allison (2018) 246
nebuchadnezzar/king of the chaldeans Allison (2018) 225
night Iribarren and Koning (2022) 91
noah Allison (2018) 246
orpheus Iribarren and Koning (2022) 90
parallelism/repetition Allison (2018) 225, 236, 246
paul,areopagus speech Potter Suh and Holladay (2021) 633
paul Johnston and Struck (2005) 181
philosophy,philosophical,succession Despotis and Lohr (2022) 231
philosophy,philosophical Despotis and Lohr (2022) 231
plato Johnston and Struck (2005) 181
priest and high priest Allison (2018) 223
rest (eschatological) Allison (2018) 232
righteousness/the righteous/the just Allison (2018) 232, 246
ritual Despotis and Lohr (2022) 231
semitisms Allison (2018) 227
seven sleepers of ephesus Allison (2018) 223, 225, 232
short recension of 4 baruch Allison (2018) 238
sickness Allison (2018) 223
sitting (posture) Allison (2018) 213, 223, 238
sixty-six years Allison (2018) 222, 225, 227, 238
svenbro Johnston and Struck (2005) 181, 182
symbolism Allison (2018) 222, 223
temple in jerusalem,destruction of Allison (2018) 213
temple in jerusalem Allison (2018) 222, 223, 225
theodore psalter Allison (2018) 238
theophilestatos' Van der Horst (2014) 251
theopompus Johnston and Struck (2005) 181, 182
thought,epimenides redivivus Potter Suh and Holladay (2021) 633
torah Allison (2018) 227, 246
way of life Despotis and Lohr (2022) 231
zeus,aratus,phaenomena Potter Suh and Holladay (2021) 633
zeus,cleanthes,hymn Potter Suh and Holladay (2021) 633