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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



4471
Diodorus Siculus, Historical Library, 5.48.4


nan But Zeus desired that the other of his two sons might also attain to honour, and so he instructed him in the initiatory rite of the mysteries, which had existed on the island since ancient times but was at that time, so to speak, put in his hands; it is not lawful, however, for any but the initiated to hear about the mysteries.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

6 results
1. Euripides, Bacchae, 472-474, 73-76, 471 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

471. τὰ δʼ ὄργιʼ ἐστὶ τίνʼ ἰδέαν ἔχοντά σοι; Διόνυσος 471. What appearance do your rites have? Dionysu
2. Euripides, Rhesus, 973, 972 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

972. As under far Pangaion Orpheus lies
3. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 2.37.3 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

2.37.3. But all this ease in our private relations does not make us lawless as citizens. Against this fear is our chief safeguard, teaching us to obey the magistrates and the laws, particularly such as regard the protection of the injured, whether they are actually on the statute book, or belong to that code which, although unwritten, yet cannot be broken without acknowledged disgrace.
4. Diodorus Siculus, Historical Library, 5.49.5 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

5.49.5.  Now the details of the initiatory rite are guarded among the matters not to be divulged and are communicated to the initiates alone; but the fame has travelled wide of how these gods appear to mankind and bring unexpected aid to those initiates of theirs who call upon them in the midst of perils.
5. Strabo, Geography, 10.3.7 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

10.3.7. The accounts which are more remotely related, however, to the present subject, but are wrongly, on account of the identity of the names, brought into the same connection by the historians — I mean those accounts which, although they are called Curetan History and History of the Curetes, just as if they were the history of those Curetes who lived in Aitolia and Acaria, not only are different from that history, but are more like the accounts of the Satyri, Sileni, Bacchae, and Tityri; for the Curetes, like these, are called genii or ministers of gods by those who have handed down to us the Cretan and the Phrygian traditions, which are interwoven with certain sacred rites, some mystical, the others connected in part with the rearing of the child Zeus in Crete and in part with the orgies in honor of the Mother of the Gods which are celebrated in Phrygia and in the region of the Trojan Ida. But the variation in these accounts is so small that, whereas some represent the Corybantes, the Cabeiri, the Idaean Dactyli, and the Telchines as identical with the Curetes, others represent them as all kinsmen of one another and differentiate only certain small matters in which they differ in respect to one another; but, roughly speaking and in general, they represent them, one and all, as a kind of inspired people and as subject to Bacchic frenzy, and, in the guise of ministers, as inspiring terror at the celebration of the sacred rites by means of war-dances, accompanied by uproar and noise and cymbals and drums and arms, and also by flute and outcry; and consequently these rites are in a way regarded as having a common relationship, I mean these and those of the Samothracians and those in Lemnos and in several other places, because the divine ministers are called the same. However, every investigation of this kind pertains to theology, and is not foreign to the speculation of the philosopher.
6. Apuleius, Apology, 34 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
alliteration Griffiths, The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI) (1975) 280
concepts/values/beliefs Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 172
cult/ritual/worship Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 172
death, prayed for, sin worthy of death Griffiths, The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI) (1975) 280
death, prayed for, voluntary death and rite of dedication Griffiths, The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI) (1975) 280
dedication, rite of, performed in manner of voluntary death Griffiths, The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI) (1975) 280
election, isis elects people near end of life Griffiths, The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI) (1975) 280
euripides, bacchae Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 172
grace, life obtained by Griffiths, The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI) (1975) 280
hēsychia/calm life/quietism Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 172
initiands/initiates/initiation Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 172
initiation, isis urges, and life obtained by grace, ibid. Griffiths, The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI) (1975) 280
isis, commands of Griffiths, The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI) (1975) 280
isis, elects people near end of life Griffiths, The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI) (1975) 280
isis, mistress, sovereign, who commands Griffiths, The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI) (1975) 280
joseph of arimathea Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 172
life, new, through providence of isis Griffiths, The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI) (1975) 280
life, obtained by grace, and manner of initiation Griffiths, The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI) (1975) 280
light, threshold of end of Griffiths, The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI) (1975) 280
makarismos Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 172
mystic initiation Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 172
parodos, of bacchae Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 172
pentheus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 172
phronēsis Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 172
poetical colouring Griffiths, The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI) (1975) 280
providence, of isis, it causes people to be born again in new life Griffiths, The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI) (1975) 280
reception, of concepts and ideas Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 172
resemblances, reception Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 172
syncretism Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 172
theologos (iohannes) Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 172
voluntary death, and rite of dedication' Griffiths, The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI) (1975) 280