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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



4471
Diodorus Siculus, Historical Library, 4.2.5


nan After he had received his rearing by the nymphs in Nysa, they say, he made the discovery of wine and taught mankind how to cultivate the vine. And as he visited the inhabited world almost in its entirety, he brought much land under cultivation and in return for this received most high honours at the hands of all men. He also discovered the drink made out of barley and called by some zythos, the bouquet of which is not much inferior to that of wine. The preparation of this drink he taught to those peoples whose country was unsuited to the cultivation of the vine.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

7 results
1. Archilochus, Fragments, 42 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

2. Archilochus, Fragments, 42 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

3. Aeschylus, Suppliant Women, 953, 952 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

952. ἀλλʼ ἄρσενάς τοι τῆσδε γῆς οἰκήτορας 952. It is men, I believe, you will find in the dwellers of this land; and they are no drinkers of diluted wine. Exit Herald. But
4. Euripides, Bacchae, 177, 827-838, 176 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

176. θύρσους ἀνάπτειν καὶ νεβρῶν δορὰς ἔχειν
5. Demosthenes, Orations, 18.259-18.260 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

6. Diodorus Siculus, Historical Library, 1.9.3, 1.14.1, 1.15.8, 4.1.6 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.9.3.  Again, with respect to the antiquity of the human race, not only do Greeks put forth their claims but many of the barbarians as well, all holding that it is they who were autochthonous and the first of all men to discover the things which are of use in life, and that it was the events in their own history which were the earliest to have been held worthy of record. 1.14.1.  Osiris was the first, they record, to make mankind give up cannibalism; for after Isis had discovered the fruit of both wheat and barley which grew wild over the land along with the other plants but was still unknown to man, and Osiris had also devised the cultivation of these fruits, all men were glad to change their food, both because of the pleasing nature of the newly-discovered grains and because it seemed to their advantage to refrain from their butchery of one another. 1.15.8.  And the discovery of the vine, they say, was made by him near Nysa, and that, having further devised the proper treatment of its fruit, he was the first to drink wine and taught mankind at large the culture of the vine and the use of wine, as well as the way to harvest the grape and to store wine. 4.1.6.  And we shall begin with Dionysus because he not only belongs to a very ancient time but also conferred very great benefactions upon the race of men. We have stated in the previous Books that certain barbarian peoples claim for themselves the birthplace of this god. The Egyptians, for example, say that the god who among them bears the name Osiris is the one whom the Greeks call Dionysus.
7. Diogenes Laertius, Lives of The Philosophers, 1.23, 1.112, 2.1-2.2 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

1.23. After engaging in politics he became a student of nature. According to some he left nothing in writing; for the Nautical Astronomy attributed to him is said to be by Phocus of Samos. Callimachus knows him as the discoverer of the Ursa Minor; for he says in his Iambics:Who first of men the course made plainof those small stars we call the Wain,Whereby Phoenicians sail the main.But according to others he wrote nothing but two treatises, one On the Solstice and one On the Equinox, regarding all other matters as incognizable. He seems by some accounts to have been the first to study astronomy, the first to predict eclipses of the sun and to fix the solstices; so Eudemus in his History of Astronomy. It was this which gained for him the admiration of Xenophanes and Herodotus and the notice of Heraclitus and Democritus. 1.112. He also compiled prose works On Sacrifices and the Cretan Constitution, also On Minos and Rhadamanthus, running to about 4000 lines. At Athens again he founded the sanctuary of the Solemn Gods (Semnai Theai), as Lobon of Argos tells us in his work On Poets. He is stated to have been the first who purified houses and fields, and the first who founded sanctuaries. Some are found to maintain that he did not go to sleep but withdrew himself for a while, engaged in gathering simples.There is extant a letter of his to Solon the lawgiver, containing a scheme of government which Minos drew up for the Cretans. But Demetrius of Magnesia, in his work on poets and writers of the same name, endeavours to discredit the letter on the ground that it is late and not written in the Cretan dialect but in Attic, and New Attic too. However, I have found another letter by him which runs as follows:Epimenides to Solon 2.1. BOOK 2: 1. ANAXIMANDERAnaximander, the son of Praxiades, was a native of Miletus. He laid down as his principle and element that which is unlimited without defining it as air or water or anything else. He held that the parts undergo change, but the whole is unchangeable; that the earth, which is of spherical shape, lies in the midst, occupying the place of a centre; that the moon, shining with borrowed light, derives its illumination from the sun; further, that the sun is as large as the earth and consists of the purest fire.He was the first inventor of the gnomon and set it up for a sundial in Lacedaemon, as is stated by Favorinus in his Miscellaneous History, in order to mark the solstices and the equinoxes; he also constructed clocks to tell the time. 2.2. He was the first to draw on a map the outline of land and sea, and he constructed a globe as well.His exposition of his doctrines took the form of a summary which no doubt came into the hands, among others, of Apollodorus of Athens. He says in his Chronology that in the second year of the 58th Olympiad Anaximander was sixty-four, and that he died not long afterwards. Thus he flourished almost at the same time as Polycrates the tyrant of Samos. There is a story that the boys laughed at his singing, and that, when he heard of it, he rejoined, Then to please the boys I must improve my singing.There is another Anaximander, also of Miletus, a historian who wrote in the Ionic dialect.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aeschines Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 166
agave Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 166
alcohol, drunkenness Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 105
anaximander Lloyd, The Revolutions of Wisdom: Studies in the Claims and Practice of Ancient Greek Science (1989) 52
apollo, and hermes Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 133
apollo Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 133
archimedes Lloyd, The Revolutions of Wisdom: Studies in the Claims and Practice of Ancient Greek Science (1989) 52
archimystes Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 166
archytas Lloyd, The Revolutions of Wisdom: Studies in the Claims and Practice of Ancient Greek Science (1989) 52
ares Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 133
autonoe Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 166
babylonians Lloyd, The Revolutions of Wisdom: Studies in the Claims and Practice of Ancient Greek Science (1989) 52
bacchants, bacchae, bacchai Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 166
bacchus, bacchius Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 166
baubo bacchant Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 166
crocus Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 133
cult, cultic acts for specific cults, the corresponding god or place Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 166
dance, dancing, ecstatic, frenzied, maenadic, orgiastic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 166
death associated with dionysos and dionysian cult or myth Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 166
diogenes laertius Lloyd, The Revolutions of Wisdom: Studies in the Claims and Practice of Ancient Greek Science (1989) 52
dionysos Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 166
dismemberment Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 166
eclipse Lloyd, The Revolutions of Wisdom: Studies in the Claims and Practice of Ancient Greek Science (1989) 52
ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 166
egypt Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 105; Lloyd, The Revolutions of Wisdom: Studies in the Claims and Practice of Ancient Greek Science (1989) 52
epimenides Lloyd, The Revolutions of Wisdom: Studies in the Claims and Practice of Ancient Greek Science (1989) 52
erotic context Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 133
feminine Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 166
finnegan, r. Lloyd, The Revolutions of Wisdom: Studies in the Claims and Practice of Ancient Greek Science (1989) 52
galen Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 133
goody, j. Lloyd, The Revolutions of Wisdom: Studies in the Claims and Practice of Ancient Greek Science (1989) 52
hellenistic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 166
hephaestus Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 133
hermaphrodite/hermaphroditus Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 133
hermes, erotic, see also erotic context Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 133
homer, odyssey Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 133
ino Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 166
inventions Lloyd, The Revolutions of Wisdom: Studies in the Claims and Practice of Ancient Greek Science (1989) 52
kadmos, kadmeian Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 166
kosko, hillock Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 166
maenads, maenadic, maenadism, rites/cults Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 166
maenads, maenadic, maenadism Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 166
magnesia, magnesian Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 166
male Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 166
manliness Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 105
masculine Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 166
minyads, daughters of minyas psoloeis Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 166
mountains Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 166
myth, mythical Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 166
oenotropoe Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 166
oracle, oracular Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 166
orality Lloyd, The Revolutions of Wisdom: Studies in the Claims and Practice of Ancient Greek Science (1989) 52
pelasgos Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 105
pentheus Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 166
proetids, daughters of proetus Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 166
purifications Lloyd, The Revolutions of Wisdom: Studies in the Claims and Practice of Ancient Greek Science (1989) 52
rite, ritual, maenadic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 166
rite, ritual Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 166
semele Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 166
symposium Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 166
tabarnis Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 166
teiresias Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 166
thales Lloyd, The Revolutions of Wisdom: Studies in the Claims and Practice of Ancient Greek Science (1989) 52
theater, theatrical Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 166
thebes, theban Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 166
thettale Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 166
thiasos θίασος Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 166
thrace Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 105
tradition Lloyd, The Revolutions of Wisdom: Studies in the Claims and Practice of Ancient Greek Science (1989) 52
woman Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 166
worship Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 166
worshippers' Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 166
zeus, zeus katabates Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 166
zeus Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 166