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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



4471
Diodorus Siculus, Historical Library, 31.34


nan As the situation worsened Orophernes was anxious to pay his men, for fear they might start a revolution. But being for the present without funds he was driven to plundering the temple of Zeus, which stands beneath the Mountain of Ariadnê, as it is called, though from remote times it had been held inviolable. This he robbed, and paid off the arrears of their wages.


nan1.  As the situation worsened Orophernes was anxious to pay his men, for fear they might start a revolution. But being for the present without funds he was driven to plundering the temple of Zeus, which stands beneath the Mountain of Ariadnê, as it is called, though from remote times it had been held inviolable. This he robbed, and paid off the arrears of their wages.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

5 results
1. Septuagint, 1 Maccabees, 7.26 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

7.26. Then the king sent Nicanor, one of his honored princes, who hated and detested Israel, and he commanded him to destroy the people.
2. Septuagint, 2 Maccabees, 4.30 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

4.30. While such was the state of affairs, it happened that the people of Tarsus and of Mallus revolted because their cities had been given as a present to Antiochis, the king's concubine.'
3. Septuagint, Judith, 1.1, 1.11, 2.4, 2.7 (2nd cent. BCE - 0th cent. CE)

1.1. In the twelfth year of the reign of Nebuchadnezzar, who ruled over the Assyrians in the great city of Nineveh, in the days of Arphaxad, who ruled over the Medes in Ecbatana -- 1.11. But all who lived in the whole region disregarded the orders of Nebuchadnezzar king of the Assyrians, and refused to join him in the war; for they were not afraid of him, but looked upon him as only one man, and they sent back his messengers empty-handed and shamefaced. 2.4. When he had finished setting forth his plan, Nebuchadnezzar king of the Assyrians called Holofernes, the chief general of his army, second only to himself, and said to him 2.7. Tell them to prepare earth and water, for I am coming against them in my anger, and will cover the whole face of the earth with the feet of my armies, and will hand them over to be plundered by my troops
4. Diodorus Siculus, Historical Library, 17.5.3-17.5.5, 31.32 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

17.5.3.  As our narrative is now to treat of the kingdom of the Persians, we must go back a little to pick up the thread. While Philip was still king, Ochus ruled the Persians and oppressed his subjects cruelly and harshly. Since his savage disposition made him hated, the chiliarch Bagoas, a eunuch in physical fact but a militant rogue in disposition, killed him by poison administered by a certain physician and placed upon the throne the youngest of his sons, Arses. 17.5.4.  He similarly made away with the brothers of the new king, who were barely of age, in order that the young man might be isolated and tractable to his control. But the young king let it be known that he was offended at Bagoas's previous outrageous behaviour and was prepared to punish the author of these crimes, so Bagoas anticipated his intentions and killed Arses and his children also while he was still in the third year of his reign. 17.5.5.  The royal house was thus extinguished, and there was no one in the direct line of descent to claim the throne. Instead Bagoas selected a certain Dareius, a member of the court circle, and secured the throne for him. He was the son of Arsanes, and grandson of that Ostanes who was a brother of Artaxerxes, who had been king. 31.32. 1.  Orophernes, having driven his brother Ariarathes from the throne, made no effort — far from it — to manage his affairs sensibly, and to elicit popular support by helping and serving his people. Indeed, at the very time when he was raising money by forced contributions and was putting numbers of people to death, he presented Timotheüs with a gift of fifty talents, and King Demetrius with a gift of seventy, quite apart from the payment to Demetrius of six hundred talents with a promise to pay the remaining four hundred at another time. And seeing that the Cappadocians were disaffected, he began to exact contributions on all sides and to confiscate for the privy purse the property of men of the highest distinction. When he head amassed a great sum, he deposited four hundred talents with the city of Prienê as a hedge against the surprises of fortune, which amount the citizens of Prienê later paid. King Eumenes, grieved at the expulsion of Ariarathes and being eager for reasons of his own to check Demetrius, sent for a certain youth who in beauty of countece and in age was exceedingly like Antiochus the late king of Syria. This man resided in Smyrna and stoutly affirmed that he was a son of King Antiochus; and because of the resemblance he found many to believe him. On his arrival at Pergamum the king tricked him out with a diadem and the other insignia proper to a king, then sent him to a certain Cilician named Zenophanes. This man, who had quarrelled for some reason with Demetrius, and had been assisted in certain difficult situations by Eumenes, who was then king, was accordingly at odds with the one, and kindly disposed to the other. He received the youth in a town of Cilicia, and spread the word abroad in Syria that the youth would reclaim his father's kingdom in his own good time. Now after the generous behaviour of their former kings the common peoples of Syria were ill pleased with the austerity of Demetrius and his drastic demands. Being therefore ready for a change, they were buoyed up with hopeful expectations that the government would shortly fall into the hands of another and more considerate monarch. While returning from Rome the envoys of Orophernes formed a plot during the voyage against Ariarathes, but were themselves apprehended and put to death by Ariarathes at Corcyra. Likewise at Corinth when the henchmen of Orophernes laid plans against Ariarathes, he upset their calculations by eluding them, and got safe to Attalus at Pergamum.
5. Strabo, Geography, 12.8.14 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

12.8.14. Now Phrygia Paroreia has a kind of mountainous ridge extending from the east towards the west; and below it on either side lies a large plain. And there are cities near it: towards the north, Philomelium, and, on the other side, the Antiocheia near Pisidia, as it is called, the former lying wholly in a plain, whereas the latter is on a hill and has a colony of Romans. The latter was settled by Magnetans who lived near the Maeander River. The Romans set them free from their kings at the time when they gave over to Eumenes the rest of Asia this side the Taurus. Here there was also a priesthood of Men Arcaeus, which had a number of temple-slaves and sacred places, but the priesthood was destroyed after the death of Amyntas by those who were sent thither as his inheritors. Synnada is not a large city; but there lies in front of it a plain planted with olives, about sixty stadia in circuit. And beyond it is Docimaea, a village, and also the quarry of Synnadic marble (so the Romans call it, though the natives call it Docimite or Docimaean ). At first this quarry yielded only stones of small size, but on account of the present extravagance of the Romans great monolithic pillars are taken from it, which in their variety of colors are nearly like the alabastrite marble; so that, although the transportation of such heavy burdens to the sea is difficult, still, both pillars and slabs, remarkable for their size and beauty, are conveyed to Rome.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
antiochis Gera, Judith (2014) 36
antiochus iii Gera, Judith (2014) 36
antiochus iv epiphanes Gera, Judith (2014) 36
artaxerxes iii ochus Gera, Judith (2014) 35, 36
attitudes, roman Dignas, Economy of the Sacred in Hellenistic and Roman Asia Minor (2002) 245
bagoas, and artaxerxes iii Gera, Judith (2014) 35, 36
book of judith, fictionality Gera, Judith (2014) 35, 36
book of judith, manuscripts Gera, Judith (2014) 36
booty and plundering Gera, Judith (2014) 35, 36
cambyses Gera, Judith (2014) 36
cappadocia Gera, Judith (2014) 35, 36
civic, cults Dignas, Economy of the Sacred in Hellenistic and Roman Asia Minor (2002) 245
clodius pulcher, publius Dignas, Economy of the Sacred in Hellenistic and Roman Asia Minor (2002) 245
comana, in pontus Dignas, Economy of the Sacred in Hellenistic and Roman Asia Minor (2002) 245
cyprus Gera, Judith (2014) 35
darius i Gera, Judith (2014) 36
demetrius i soter Gera, Judith (2014) 36
diodorus siculus Gera, Judith (2014) 35, 36
earth, and water Gera, Judith (2014) 35
egypt and egyptians Gera, Judith (2014) 35
gold, and silver Gera, Judith (2014) 35
herodotus Gera, Judith (2014) 35
holophernes, and artaxerxes iii Gera, Judith (2014) 35, 36
holophernes, name Gera, Judith (2014) 35
jericho Gera, Judith (2014) 35
jerusalem Gera, Judith (2014) 35
mithridates Dignas, Economy of the Sacred in Hellenistic and Roman Asia Minor (2002) 245
murena Dignas, Economy of the Sacred in Hellenistic and Roman Asia Minor (2002) 245
nebuchadnezzar of judith, real identity Gera, Judith (2014) 35, 36
nicanor Gera, Judith (2014) 36
orophernes Gera, Judith (2014) 35, 36
palestine Gera, Judith (2014) 35
persian traces in judith Gera, Judith (2014) 35
pessinous Dignas, Economy of the Sacred in Hellenistic and Roman Asia Minor (2002) 245
phoenicia Gera, Judith (2014) 35
priests, authority of Dignas, Economy of the Sacred in Hellenistic and Roman Asia Minor (2002) 245
sidon Gera, Judith (2014) 35
sulpicius severus Gera, Judith (2014) 36
temple-states' Dignas, Economy of the Sacred in Hellenistic and Roman Asia Minor (2002) 245
temples, foreign Gera, Judith (2014) 35, 36
wine and drunkenness Gera, Judith (2014) 36
xerxes Gera, Judith (2014) 36