Home About Network of subjects Linked subjects heatmap Book indices included Search by subject Search by reference Browse subjects Browse texts

Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



4471
Diodorus Siculus, Historical Library, 31.11.2


nan Even at the time, he said, he marvelled at the unexpectedness of his victories, and when, shortly thereafter, he captured the king, his children, and the royal treasure, he marvelled even more at the favourable tide of fortune. When, further, the treasure and his soldiers were conveyed safely and swiftly across to Italy, he was utterly puzzled by the fact that the whole affair was being brought to an end so much more fortunately than he had expected. But when all men joined in rejoicing with him, and felicitated him on his good fortune, then above all did he look for some calamity from destiny, and therefore he implored the god that the reversal might not in any way affect the state, but rather, if it was certainly the divine pleasure to bring some hardship to pass, that the burden might fall on him.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

7 results
1. Plato, Phaedrus, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

2. Diodorus Siculus, Historical Library, 2.2.1 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.2.1.  Since the undertakings of Ninus were prospering in this way, he was seized with a powerful desire to subdue all of Asia that lies between the Tanaïs and the Nile; for, as a general thing, when men enjoy good fortune, the steady current of their success prompts in them the desire for more. Consequently he made one of his friends satrap of Media, while he himself set about the task of subduing the nations of Asia, and within a period of seventeen years he became master of them all except the Indians and Bactrians.
3. Livy, History, 45.41.1, 45.41.3-45.41.6, 45.41.8-45.41.12 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4. Plutarch, Aemilius Paulus, 36 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

5. Plutarch, Pericles, 20.4 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

6. Suetonius, Tiberius, 61.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

7. Valerius Maximus, Memorable Deeds And Sayings, None (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
adoption Mueller, Roman Religion in Valerius Maximus (2002) 195
athenaeus (author), fragmentary writers and Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 244
athenaeus (author), paraphrases, interpretive Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 244
athenaeus (author), paraphrases original sources Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 244
athenaeus (author) Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 244
blood, ties of (biological and religious) Mueller, Roman Religion in Valerius Maximus (2002) 195
carthage/carthaginians Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 244
chance, tuche Mueller, Roman Religion in Valerius Maximus (2002) 195
decadence, processes of Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 244
divorce Mueller, Roman Religion in Valerius Maximus (2002) 195
exempla, intensification of religious element in Mueller, Roman Religion in Valerius Maximus (2002) 215
felicitas (success, prosperity) Mueller, Roman Religion in Valerius Maximus (2002) 195, 215
historiography, hellenistic Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 244
hubris Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 244
manes (ancestral dead)' Mueller, Roman Religion in Valerius Maximus (2002) 195
scythians Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 244
socrates Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 244
wealth/prosperity Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 244