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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



4471
Diodorus Siculus, Historical Library, 3.65.7


nan But some of the poets, one of whom is Antimachus, state that Lycurgus was king, not of Thrace, but of Arabia, and that the attack upon Dionysus and the Bacchantes was made at the Nysa which is in Arabia. However this may be, Dionysus, they say, punished the impious but treated all other men honourably, and then made his return journey from India to Thebes upon an elephant.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

7 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 6.130-6.140 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

6.130. /Nay, for even the son of Dryas, mighty Lycurgus, lived not long, seeing that he strove with heavenly gods—he that on a time drave down over the sacred mount of Nysa the nursing mothers of mad Dionysus; and they all let fall to the ground their wands, smitten with an ox-goad by man-slaying Lycurgus. 6.131. /Nay, for even the son of Dryas, mighty Lycurgus, lived not long, seeing that he strove with heavenly gods—he that on a time drave down over the sacred mount of Nysa the nursing mothers of mad Dionysus; and they all let fall to the ground their wands, smitten with an ox-goad by man-slaying Lycurgus. 6.132. /Nay, for even the son of Dryas, mighty Lycurgus, lived not long, seeing that he strove with heavenly gods—he that on a time drave down over the sacred mount of Nysa the nursing mothers of mad Dionysus; and they all let fall to the ground their wands, smitten with an ox-goad by man-slaying Lycurgus. 6.133. /Nay, for even the son of Dryas, mighty Lycurgus, lived not long, seeing that he strove with heavenly gods—he that on a time drave down over the sacred mount of Nysa the nursing mothers of mad Dionysus; and they all let fall to the ground their wands, smitten with an ox-goad by man-slaying Lycurgus. 6.134. /Nay, for even the son of Dryas, mighty Lycurgus, lived not long, seeing that he strove with heavenly gods—he that on a time drave down over the sacred mount of Nysa the nursing mothers of mad Dionysus; and they all let fall to the ground their wands, smitten with an ox-goad by man-slaying Lycurgus. 6.135. /But Dionysus fled, and plunged beneath the wave of the sea, and Thetis received him in her bosom, filled with dread, for mighty terror gat hold of him at the man's threatenings. Then against Lycurgus did the gods that live at ease wax wroth, and the son of Cronos made him blind; 6.136. /But Dionysus fled, and plunged beneath the wave of the sea, and Thetis received him in her bosom, filled with dread, for mighty terror gat hold of him at the man's threatenings. Then against Lycurgus did the gods that live at ease wax wroth, and the son of Cronos made him blind; 6.137. /But Dionysus fled, and plunged beneath the wave of the sea, and Thetis received him in her bosom, filled with dread, for mighty terror gat hold of him at the man's threatenings. Then against Lycurgus did the gods that live at ease wax wroth, and the son of Cronos made him blind; 6.138. /But Dionysus fled, and plunged beneath the wave of the sea, and Thetis received him in her bosom, filled with dread, for mighty terror gat hold of him at the man's threatenings. Then against Lycurgus did the gods that live at ease wax wroth, and the son of Cronos made him blind; 6.139. /But Dionysus fled, and plunged beneath the wave of the sea, and Thetis received him in her bosom, filled with dread, for mighty terror gat hold of him at the man's threatenings. Then against Lycurgus did the gods that live at ease wax wroth, and the son of Cronos made him blind; 6.140. /and he lived not for long, seeing that he was hated of all the immortal gods. So would not I be minded to fight against the blessed gods. But if thou art of men, who eat the fruit of the field, draw nigh, that thou mayest the sooner enter the toils of destruction. Then spake to him the glorious son of Hippolochus:
2. Euripides, Bacchae, 227-232, 278-283, 471-475, 511-514, 616-631, 794-797, 850-854, 912-913, 226 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

3. Euripides, Rhesus, 971-973, 970 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

970. Alone for ever, in a caverned place
4. Sophocles, Antigone, 956-965, 955 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

5. Septuagint, 3 Maccabees, 1.12, 3.25, 5.5-5.6, 5.11, 5.27-5.30, 5.42-5.43, 6.27 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

1.12. Even after the law had been read to him, he did not cease to maintain that he ought to enter, saying, "Even if those men are deprived of this honor, I ought not to be. 3.25. Therefore we have given orders that, as soon as this letter shall arrive, you are to send to us those who live among you, together with their wives and children, with insulting and harsh treatment, and bound securely with iron fetters, to suffer the sure and shameful death that befits enemies. 5.5. The servants in charge of the Jews went out in the evening and bound the hands of the wretched people and arranged for their continued custody through the night, convinced that the whole nation would experience its final destruction. 5.5. Not only this, but when they considered the help which they had received before from heaven they prostrated themselves with one accord on the ground, removing the babies from their breasts 5.6. For to the Gentiles it appeared that the Jews were left without any aid 5.11. But the Lord sent upon the king a portion of sleep, that beneficence which from the beginning, night and day, is bestowed by him who grants it to whomever he wishes. 5.27. But he, upon receiving the report and being struck by the unusual invitation to come out -- since he had been completely overcome by incomprehension -- inquired what the matter was for which this had been so zealously completed for him. 5.28. This was the act of God who rules over all things, for he had implanted in the king's mind a forgetfulness of the things he had previously devised. 5.29. Then Hermon and all the king's friends pointed out that the beasts and the armed forces were ready, "O king, according to your eager purpose. 5.42. Upon this the king, a Phalaris in everything and filled with madness, took no account of the changes of mind which had come about within him for the protection of the Jews, and he firmly swore an irrevocable oath that he would send them to death without delay, mangled by the knees and feet of the beasts 5.43. and would also march against Judea and rapidly level it to the ground with fire and spear, and by burning to the ground the temple inaccessible to him would quickly render it forever empty of those who offered sacrifices there. 6.27. Loose and untie their unjust bonds! Send them back to their homes in peace, begging pardon for your former actions!
6. Diodorus Siculus, Historical Library, 3.65.5-3.65.6, 5.50, 5.52 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3.65.5.  Consequently he sailed across secretly to his army, and then Lycurgus, they say, falling upon the Maenads in the city known as Nysium, slew them all, but Dionysus, bringing his forces over, conquered the Thracians in a battle, and taking Lycurgus alive put out his eyes and inflicted upon him every kind of outrage, and then crucified him. 3.65.6.  Thereupon, out of gratitude to Charops for the aid the man had rendered him, Dionysus made over to him the kingdom of the Thracians and instructed him in the secret rites connected with the initiations; and Oeagrus, the son of Charops, then took over both the kingdom and the initiatory rites which were handed down in the mysteries, the rites which afterwards Orpheus, the son of Oeagrus, who was the superior of all men in natural gifts and education, learned from his father; Orpheus also made many changes in the practices and for that reason the rites which had been established by Dionysus were also called "Orphic. 5.50. 1.  Since we have set forth the facts concerning Samothrace, we shall now, in accordance with our plan, discuss Naxos. This island was first called Strongylê and its first settlers were men from Thrace, the reasons for their coming being somewhat as follows.,2.  The myth relates that two sons, Butes and Lycurgus, were born to Boreas, but not by the same mother; and Butes, who was the younger, formed a plot against his brother, and on being discovered he received no punishment from Lycurgus beyond that he was ordered by Lycurgus to gather ships and, together with his accomplices in the plot, to seek out another land in which to make his home.,3.  Consequently Butes, together with the Thracians who were implicated with him, set forth, and making his way through the islands of the Cyclades he seized the island of Strongylê, where he made his home and proceeded to plunder many of those who sailed past the island. And since they had no women they sailed here and there and seized them from the land.,4.  Now some of the islands of the Cyclades had no inhabitants whatsoever and others were sparsely settled; consequently they sailed further, and having been repulsed once from Euboea, they sailed to Thessaly, where Butes and his companions, upon landing, came upon the female devotees of Dionysus as they were celebrating the orgies of the god near Drius, as it is called, in Achaea Phthiotis.,5.  As Butes and his companions rushed at the women, these threw away the sacred objects, and some of them fled for safety to the sea, and others to the mountain called Dius; but Coronis, the myth continues, was seized by Butes and forced to lie with him. And she, in anger at the seizure and at the insolent treatment she had received, called upon Dionysus to lend her his aid. And the god struck Butes with madness, because of which he lost his mind and, throwing himself into a well, met his death.,6.  But the rest of the Thracians seized some of the other women, the most renowned of whom were Iphimedeia, the wife of Aloeus, and Pancratis, her daughter, and taking these women along with them, they sailed off to Strongylê. And in place of Butes the Thracians made Agassamenus king of the island, and to him they united in marriage Pancratis, the daughter of Aloeus, who was a woman of surpassing beauty;,7.  for, before their choice fell on Agassamenus, the most renowned among their leaders, Sicelus and Hecetorus, had quarrelled over Pancratis and had slain each other. And Agassamenus appointed one of his friends his lieutet and united Iphimedeia to him in marriage. 5.52. 1.  The myth which the Naxians have to relate about Dionysus is like this: He was reared, they say, in their country, and for this reason the island has been most dear to him and is called by some Dionysias.,2.  For according to the myth which has been handed down to us, Zeus, on the occasion when Semelê had been slain by his lightning before the time for bearing the child, took the babe and sewed it up within his thigh, and when the appointed time came for its birth, wishing to keep the matter concealed from Hera, he took the babe from his thigh in what is now Naxos and gave it to the Nymphs of the island, Philia, Coronis, and Cleidê, to be reared. The reason Zeus slew Semelê with his lightning before she could give birth to her child was his desire that the babe should be born, not of a mortal woman but of two immortals, and thus should be immortal from its very birth.,3.  And because of the kindness which the inhabitants of Naxos had shown to Dionysus in connection with his rearing they received marks of his gratitude; for the island increased in prosperity and fitted out notable naval forces, and the Naxians were the first to withdraw from the naval forces of Xerxes and to aid in the defeat at sea which the barbarian suffered, and they participated with distinction in the battle of Plataeae. Also the wine of the island possesses an excellence which is peculiarly its own and offers proof of the friendship which the god entertains for the island.
7. Nonnus, Dionysiaca, 21.155-21.169 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
alcohol, drunkenness Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 5
alexandria, alexandrian Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 459
altar Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 56
ambrosia (the nymph) Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 56
arabia Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 56, 184
cannibal, cannibalism Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 5
censer θυμιατήριον Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 459
cult, cultic acts for specific cults, the corresponding god or place Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 459
damascus Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 184
death associated with dionysos and dionysian cult or myth Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 459
dionysism Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 459
dionysos Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 459
divine status Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 56
egypt, egyptian Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 459
eyes, eyesight, blindness Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 56
flute Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 459
frenzy, mania, madness Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 5
gift Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 459
hera Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 56
horse Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 43
hybris Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 459
immortality Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 43, 56
imprisonment, captivity Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 56
incense Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 459
initiation/rite of passage Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 56
ivy Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 459
jerusalem, temple of Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 459
jews, jewish Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 459
liberation Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 459
lycurgus (another mythical figure) Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 43
lyssa/fury Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 184
mountains Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 5
mysteries, mystery cults, bacchic, dionysiac Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 459
naxos Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 184
nysa, nyseion, nysion Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 56, 184
orpheus Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 5
pangaion Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 184
pentheus Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 459
poseidon Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 56
possession, possessed Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 459
promise Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 459
ptolemies Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 459
ptolemy iv philopator Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 459
punishment Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 459
resistence Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 56
rheia Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 56
rite, ritual Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 459
seleucids Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 459
semele Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 459
shai al-quam Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 5
syria Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 5, 56
temple Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 459
thebes, theban Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 459
thebes (in boeotia) Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 184
thebes (in cilicia) Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 184
theomachist, theomachus Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 459
time Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 56
vine Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 56
violence/violent Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 459
wine' Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 459
zeus Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 56