Home About Network of subjects Linked subjects heatmap Book indices included Search by subject Search by reference Browse subjects Browse texts

Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



4471
Diodorus Siculus, Historical Library, 2.23.1


nan Sardanapallus, the thirtieth in succession from Ninus, who founded the empire, and the last king of the Assyrians, outdid all his predecessors in luxury and sluggishness. For not to mention the fact that he was not seen by any man residing outside the palace, he lived the life of a woman, and spending his days in the company of his concubines and spinning purple garments and working the softest of wool, he had assumed the feminine garb and so covered his face and indeed his entire body with whitening cosmetics and the other unguents used by courtesans, that he rendered it more delicate than that of any luxury-loving woman.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

9 results
1. Xenophon, The Education of Cyrus, 8.8.20 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

2. Xenophon, Memoirs, 2.6.24 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

2.6.24. Surely, then, it is likely that true gentlemen will share public honours too not only without harm to one another, but to their common benefit? For those who desire to win honour and to bear rule in their cities that they may have power to embezzle, to treat others with violence, to live in luxury, are bound to be unjust, unscrupulous, incapable of unity.
3. Xenophon, On Household Management, 5.1 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

5.1. Now I tell you this, continued Socrates , because even the wealthiest cannot hold aloof from husbandry. For the pursuit of it is in some sense a luxury as well as a means of increasing one’s estate and of training the body in all that a free man should be able to do.
4. Xenophon, Symposium, 4.41 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

4.41. For whenever I feel an inclination to indulge my appetite, I do not buy fancy articles at the market (for they come high), but I draw on the store-house of my soul. And it goes a long way farther toward producing enjoyment when I take food only after awaiting the craving for it than when I partake of one of these fancy dishes, like this fine Thasian wine that fortune has put in my way and I am drinking without the promptings of thirst.
5. Diodorus Siculus, Historical Library, 2.21 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.21. 1.  After her death Ninyas, the son of Ninus and Semiramis, succeeded to the throne and had a peaceful reign, since he in no wise emulated his mother's fondness for war and her adventurous spirit.,2.  For in the first place, he spent all his time in the palace, seen by no one but his concubines and the eunuchs who attended him, and devoted his life to luxury and idleness and the consistent avoidance of any suffering or anxiety, holding the end and aim of a happy reign to be the enjoyment of every kind of pleasure without restraint.,3.  Moreover, having in view the safety of his crown and the fear he felt with reference to his subjects, he used to summon each year a fixed number of soldiers and a general from each nation and to keep the army,,4.  which had been gathered in this way from all his subject peoples, outside his capital, appointing as commander of each nation one of the most trustworthy men in his service; and at the end of the year he would summon from his peoples a second equal number of soldiers and dismiss the former to their countries.,5.  The result of this device was that all those subject to his rule were filled with awe, seeing at all times a great host encamped in the open and punishment ready to fall on any who rebelled or would not yield obedience.,6.  This annual change of the soldiers was devised by him in order that, before the generals and all the other commanders of the army should become well acquainted with each other, every man of them would have been separated from the rest and have gone back to his own country; for long service in the field both gives the commanders experience in the arts of war and fills them with arrogance, and, above all, it offers great opportunities for rebellion and for plotting against their rulers.,7.  And the fact that he was seen by no one outside the palace made everyone ignorant of the luxury of his manner of life, and through their fear of him, as of an unseen god, each man dared not show disrespect of him even in word. So by appointing generals, satraps, ficial officers, and judges for each nation and arranging all other matters as he felt at any time to be to his advantage, he remained for his lifetime in the city of Ninus.,8.  The rest of the kings also followed his example, son succeeding father upon the throne, and reigned for thirty generations down to Sardanapallus; for it was under this ruler that the Empire of the Assyrians fell to the Medes, after it had lasted more than thirteen hundred years, as Ctesias of Cnidus says in his Second Book.
6. Livy, History, 34.7.9 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

7. Seneca The Younger, Letters, 114.4, 114.21 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

8. Cassius Dio, Roman History, 8079.1.1, 8079.13-8079.17 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

9. Ctesias, Fragments, 1



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
appearance Chrysanthou, Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire (2022) 244
assyrians Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 280, 362
athenaeus (author), fragmentary writers and Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 278, 280, 285
athenaeus (author), framing language Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 278
athenaeus (author) Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 278, 280, 285
athens/athenians Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 278
avarice/greed Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 285
barbarians Chrysanthou, Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire (2022) 244
caligula Chrysanthou, Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire (2022) 244
caracalla Chrysanthou, Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire (2022) 244
cassius dio Chrysanthou, Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire (2022) 244
clothing Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 362
commodus Chrysanthou, Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire (2022) 244
cosmetics Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 362
cretans/crete Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 285
ctesias of cnidus Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 278, 280
ctesippus Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 278
decadence, processes of Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 278, 280, 285
destruction/ruin Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 362
diodorus siculus Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 278, 280, 362
downfall Chrysanthou, Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire (2022) 244
dress Chrysanthou, Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire (2022) 244
drinking/drunkenness Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 362
dynasty Chrysanthou, Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire (2022) 244
effeminacy Chrysanthou, Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire (2022) 244; Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 278, 280, 362
elagabalus Chrysanthou, Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire (2022) 244
envy/rivalry Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 285
ephorus of cyme (historian) Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 285
eyes (as a signpost for character) Chrysanthou, Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire (2022) 244
historiography, hellenistic Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 278, 280, 285
historiography, roman Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 362
hubris Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 285, 362
insolence (ὕβρις) Chrysanthou, Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire (2022) 244
julia maesa Chrysanthou, Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire (2022) 244
julia mamaea Chrysanthou, Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire (2022) 244
laziness Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 280, 285
macrinus (opellius) Chrysanthou, Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire (2022) 244
naming Chrysanthou, Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire (2022) 244
nero Chrysanthou, Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire (2022) 244
ninyas (king of assyria) Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 278, 280
orientalism Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 278, 280
parallelism (narrative) Chrysanthou, Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire (2022) 244
pattern(ing) Chrysanthou, Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire (2022) 244
persians Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 278, 280
physiognomy Chrysanthou, Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire (2022) 244
pleasure Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 278, 280
religion Chrysanthou, Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire (2022) 244
sardanapalus (king of assyria) Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 278, 280, 362
seclusion Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 280
severus alexander Chrysanthou, Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire (2022) 244
sexuality Chrysanthou, Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire (2022) 244
soldiers Chrysanthou, Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire (2022) 244
sparta/spartans Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 285
strabo Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 285
straton (king of sidon) Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 278
theatrical(ity) Chrysanthou, Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire (2022) 244
women' Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 362
women Chrysanthou, Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire (2022) 244