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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



4471
Diodorus Siculus, Historical Library, 11.76.3


nan While these events were taking place, Ducetius, the leader of the Siceli, harbouring a grudge against the inhabitants of Catana because they had robbed the Siceli of their land, led an army against them. And since the Syracusans had likewise sent an army against Catana, they and the Siceli joined in portioning out the land in allotments among themselves and made war upon the settlers who had been sent by Hieron when he was ruler of Syracuse. The Catanians opposed them with arms, but were defeated in a number of engagements and were expelled from Catana, and they took possession of what is now Aetna, which was formerly called Inessa; and the original inhabitants of Catana, after a long period, got back their native city.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

3 results
1. Pindar, Olympian Odes, 6 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

2. Diodorus Siculus, Historical Library, 11.49.1, 11.66, 11.72 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

11.49.1.  Hieron removed the people of Naxos and Catana from their cities and sent there settlers of his own choosing, having gathered five thousand from the Peloponnesus and added an equal number of others from Syracuse; and the name of Catana he changed to Aetna, and not only the territory of Catana but also much neighbouring land which he added to it he portioned out in allotments, up to the full sum of ten thousand settlers. 11.66. 1.  When Lysistratus was archon in Athens, the Romans elected as consuls Lucius Pinarius Mamertinus and Publius Furius Fifron. In this year Hieron, the king of the Syracusans, summoning to Syracuse the sons of Anaxilas, the former tyrant of Zanclê, and giving them great gifts, reminded them of the benefactions Gelon had rendered their father, and advised them, now that they had come of age, to require an accounting of Micythus, their guardian, and themselves to take over the government of Zanclê.,2.  And when they had returned to Rhegium and required of their guardian an accounting of his administration, Micythus, who was an upright man, gathered together the old family friends of the children and rendered so honest an accounting that all present were filled with admiration of both his justice and good faith; and the children, regretting the steps they had taken, begged Micythus to take back the administration and to conduct the affairs of the state with a father's power and position.,3.  Micythus, however, did not accede to the request, but after turning everything over to them punctiliously and putting his own goods aboard a boat he set sail from Rhegium, accompanied by the goodwill of the populace; and reaching Greece he spent the rest of his life in Tegea in Arcadia, enjoying the approval of men.,4.  And Hieron, the king of the Syracusans, died in Catana and received the honours which are accorded to heroes, as having been the founder of the city. He had ruled eleven years, and he left the kingdom to his brother Thrasybulus, who ruled over the Syracusans for one year. 11.72. 1.  In Sicily, as soon as the tyranny of Syracuse had been overthrown and all the cities of the island had been liberated, the whole of Sicily was making great strides toward prosperity. For the Sicilian Greeks were at peace, and the land they cultivated was fertile, so that the abundance of their harvests enabled them soon to increase their estates and to fill the land with slaves and domestic animals and every other accompaniment of prosperity, taking in great revenues on the one hand and spending nothing upon the wars to which they had been accustomed.,2.  But later on they were again plunged into wars and civil strife for the following reasons. After the Syracusans had overthrown the tyranny of Thrasybulus, they held a meeting of the Assembly, and after deliberating on forming a democracy of their own they all voted uimously to make a colossal statue of Zeus the Liberator and each year to celebrate with sacrifices the Festival of Liberation and hold games of distinction on the day on which they had overthrown the tyrant and liberated their native city; and they also voted to sacrifice to the gods, in connection with the games, four hundred and fifty bulls and to use them for the citizens' feast.,3.  As for all the magistracies, they proposed to assign them to the original citizens, but the aliens who had been admitted to citizenship under Gelon they did not see fit to allow to share in this dignity, either because they judged them to be unworthy or because they were suspicious lest men who had been brought up in the way of tyranny and had served in war under a monarch might attempt a revolution. And that is what actually happened. For Gelon had enrolled as citizens more than ten thousand foreign mercenaries, and of these there were left at the time in question more than seven thousand.
3. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 3.9.2 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

3.9.2. Now the Corinthians were most eager to take part in the expedition to Asia, but considering it a bad omen that their temple of Zeus surnamed Olympian had been suddenly burnt down, they reluctantly remained behind. The Athenians excused themselves on the ground that their city was returning to its former state of prosperity after the Peloponnesian war and the epidemic of plague, and the news brought by messengers, that Conon, son of Timotheus, had gone up to the Persian king, strongly confirmed them in their policy of inactivity.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aetnaeans Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 633
apollo (god), sanctuary at syracuse Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 573
athena (goddess), sanctuary at syracuse Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 573
corinth Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 573
cult, transfer Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 573
dinsmoor, william b. Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 573
duketios Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 633
dunbabin, t. j. Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 573
gods and goddesses, olympian' Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 573
hieron Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 633
hippocrates of gela Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 633
leontinoi Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 633
locroi Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 633
magna graecia (south italy and sicily), religious tradition and innovation Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 573
magna graecia (south italy and sicily), temples and sanctuaries Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 573
magna graecia (south italy and sicily) Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 573
naxos (sicily) Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 633
pfaff, c. a. Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 573
sicels Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 633
thrasyboulos Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 633
zankle Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 633
zeus (god), sanctuary at syracuse Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 573