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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



4471
Diodorus Siculus, Historical Library, 11.72


nan In Sicily, as soon as the tyranny of Syracuse had been overthrown and all the cities of the island had been liberated, the whole of Sicily was making great strides toward prosperity. For the Sicilian Greeks were at peace, and the land they cultivated was fertile, so that the abundance of their harvests enabled them soon to increase their estates and to fill the land with slaves and domestic animals and every other accompaniment of prosperity, taking in great revenues on the one hand and spending nothing upon the wars to which they had been accustomed., But later on they were again plunged into wars and civil strife for the following reasons. After the Syracusans had overthrown the tyranny of Thrasybulus, they held a meeting of the Assembly, and after deliberating on forming a democracy of their own they all voted unanimously to make a colossal statue of Zeus the Liberator and each year to celebrate with sacrifices the Festival of Liberation and hold games of distinction on the day on which they had overthrown the tyrant and liberated their native city; and they also voted to sacrifice to the gods, in connection with the games, four hundred and fifty bulls and to use them for the citizens' feast., As for all the magistracies, they proposed to assign them to the original citizens, but the aliens who had been admitted to citizenship under Gelon they did not see fit to allow to share in this dignity, either because they judged them to be unworthy or because they were suspicious lest men who had been brought up in the way of tyranny and had served in war under a monarch might attempt a revolution. And that is what actually happened. For Gelon had enrolled as citizens more than ten thousand foreign mercenaries, and of these there were left at the time in question more than seven thousand.


nan1.  In Sicily, as soon as the tyranny of Syracuse had been overthrown and all the cities of the island had been liberated, the whole of Sicily was making great strides toward prosperity. For the Sicilian Greeks were at peace, and the land they cultivated was fertile, so that the abundance of their harvests enabled them soon to increase their estates and to fill the land with slaves and domestic animals and every other accompaniment of prosperity, taking in great revenues on the one hand and spending nothing upon the wars to which they had been accustomed.,2.  But later on they were again plunged into wars and civil strife for the following reasons. After the Syracusans had overthrown the tyranny of Thrasybulus, they held a meeting of the Assembly, and after deliberating on forming a democracy of their own they all voted unanimously to make a colossal statue of Zeus the Liberator and each year to celebrate with sacrifices the Festival of Liberation and hold games of distinction on the day on which they had overthrown the tyrant and liberated their native city; and they also voted to sacrifice to the gods, in connection with the games, four hundred and fifty bulls and to use them for the citizens' feast.,3.  As for all the magistracies, they proposed to assign them to the original citizens, but the aliens who had been admitted to citizenship under Gelon they did not see fit to allow to share in this dignity, either because they judged them to be unworthy or because they were suspicious lest men who had been brought up in the way of tyranny and had served in war under a monarch might attempt a revolution. And that is what actually happened. For Gelon had enrolled as citizens more than ten thousand foreign mercenaries, and of these there were left at the time in question more than seven thousand.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

6 results
1. Hesiod, Works And Days, 243-251, 242 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

242. And honest, children grow in amity
2. Theocritus, Idylls, 17 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

3. Cicero, In Verrem, 2.4.122 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4. Diodorus Siculus, Historical Library, 11.66, 11.76.3, 13.82 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

11.66. 1.  When Lysistratus was archon in Athens, the Romans elected as consuls Lucius Pinarius Mamertinus and Publius Furius Fifron. In this year Hieron, the king of the Syracusans, summoning to Syracuse the sons of Anaxilas, the former tyrant of Zanclê, and giving them great gifts, reminded them of the benefactions Gelon had rendered their father, and advised them, now that they had come of age, to require an accounting of Micythus, their guardian, and themselves to take over the government of Zanclê.,2.  And when they had returned to Rhegium and required of their guardian an accounting of his administration, Micythus, who was an upright man, gathered together the old family friends of the children and rendered so honest an accounting that all present were filled with admiration of both his justice and good faith; and the children, regretting the steps they had taken, begged Micythus to take back the administration and to conduct the affairs of the state with a father's power and position.,3.  Micythus, however, did not accede to the request, but after turning everything over to them punctiliously and putting his own goods aboard a boat he set sail from Rhegium, accompanied by the goodwill of the populace; and reaching Greece he spent the rest of his life in Tegea in Arcadia, enjoying the approval of men.,4.  And Hieron, the king of the Syracusans, died in Catana and received the honours which are accorded to heroes, as having been the founder of the city. He had ruled eleven years, and he left the kingdom to his brother Thrasybulus, who ruled over the Syracusans for one year. 11.76.3.  While these events were taking place, Ducetius, the leader of the Siceli, harbouring a grudge against the inhabitants of Catana because they had robbed the Siceli of their land, led an army against them. And since the Syracusans had likewise sent an army against Catana, they and the Siceli joined in portioning out the land in allotments among themselves and made war upon the settlers who had been sent by Hieron when he was ruler of Syracuse. The Catanians opposed them with arms, but were defeated in a number of engagements and were expelled from Catana, and they took possession of what is now Aetna, which was formerly called Inessa; and the original inhabitants of Catana, after a long period, got back their native city. 13.82. 1.  Now the sacred buildings which they constructed, and especially the temple of Zeus, bear witness to the grand manner of the men of that day. of the other sacred buildings some have been burned and others completely destroyed because of the many times the city has been taken in war, but the completion of the temple of Zeus, which was ready to receive its roof, was prevented by the war; and after the war, since the city had been completely destroyed, never in the subsequent years did the Acragantini find themselves able to finish their buildings.,2.  The temple has a length of three hundred and forty feet, a width of sixty, and a height of one hundred and twenty not including the foundation. And being as it is the largest temple in Sicily, it may not unreasonably be compared, so far as magnitude of its substructure is concerned, with the temples outside of Sicily; for even though, as it turned out, the design could not be carried out, the scale of the undertaking at any rate is clear.,3.  And though all other men build their temples either with walls forming the sides or with rows of columns, thrown enclosing their sanctuaries, this temple combines both these plans; for the columns were built in with the walls, the part extending outside the temple being rounded and that within square; and the circumference of the outer part of the column which extends from the wall is twenty feet and the body of a man may be contained in the fluting, while that of the inner part is twelve feet.,4.  The porticoes were of enormous size and height, and in the east pediment they portrayed The Battle between the Gods and the Giants which excelled in size and beauty, and in the west The Capture of Troy, in which each one of the heroes may be seen portrayed in a manner appropriate to his rôle.,5.  There was at that time also an artificial pool outside the city, seven stades in circumference and twenty cubits deep; into this they brought water and ingeniously contrived to produce a multitude of fish of every variety for their public feastings, and with the fish swans spent their time and a vast multitude of every other kind of bird, so that the pool was an object of great delight to gaze upon.,6.  And witness to the luxury of the inhabitants is also the extravagant cost of the monuments which they erected, some adorned with sculptured race-horses and others with the pet birds kept by girls and boys in their homes, monuments which Timaeus says he had seen extant even in his own lifetime.,7.  And in the Olympiad previous to the one we are discussing, namely, the Ninety-second, when Exaenetus of Acragas won the "stadion," he was conducted into the city in a chariot and in the procession there were, not to speak of the other things, three hundred chariots belonging to citizens of Acragas.,8.  Speaking generally, they led from youth onward a manner of life which was luxurious, wearing as they did exceedingly delicate clothing and gold ornaments and, besides, using strigils and oil-flasks made of silver and even of gold.
5. Plutarch, Nicias, 14.5 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

6. Epigraphy, Ogis, 54



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aetnaeans Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 633
arsinoe ii Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 63
berenike ii Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 63
duketios Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 633
hesiod (poet) Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 63
hieron Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 633
hippocrates of gela Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 633
leontinoi Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 633
locroi Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 633
monarchy, and divine origins Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 63
naxos (sicily) Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 633
old comedy (attic) Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 63
philistis (wife of hieron) Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 63
pisistratus (tyrant of athens)/pisistratids Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 63
priests/priestesses Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 63
ptolemies Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 63
sicels Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 633
syracuse, theatre building, diazoma Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 63
theron (tyrant of acragas) Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 63
thrasyboulos Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 633
zankle' Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 633
zeus, eleutherios Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 63
zeus, olympios Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 63