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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



4471
Diodorus Siculus, Historical Library, 1.92.3


nan For this reason they insist that Orpheus, having visited Egypt in ancient times and witnessed this custom, merely invented his account of Hades, in part reproducing this practice and in part inventing on his own account; but this point we shall discuss more fully a little later.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

5 results
1. Euripides, Fragments, 953-954, 952 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

2. Euripides, Hippolytus, 953-954, 952 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

3. Plato, Gorgias, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

493a. and we really, it may be, are dead; in fact I once heard sages say that we are now dead, and the body is our tomb, and the part of the soul in which we have desires is liable to be over-persuaded and to vacillate to and fro, and so some smart fellow, a Sicilian, I daresay, or Italian, made a fable in which—by a play of words—he named this part, as being so impressionable and persuadable, a jar, and the thoughtless he called uninitiate:
4. Plato, Republic, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

364b. and disregard those who are in any way weak or poor, even while admitting that they are better men than the others. But the strangest of all these speeches are the things they say about the gods and virtue, how so it is that the gods themselves assign to many good men misfortunes and an evil life but to their opposites a contrary lot; and begging priests and soothsayers go to rich men’s doors and make them believe that they by means of sacrifices and incantations have accumulated a treasure of power from the gods that can expiate and cure with pleasurable festival
5. Orphic Hymns., Fragments, 57-60, 327



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
derveni papyrus Graf and Johnston, Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets (2007) 174
egypt, egyptian Graf and Johnston, Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets (2007) 174
egypt/egyptian de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 58
katabasis, orphic Graf and Johnston, Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets (2007) 174
orpheus, as argonaut Graf and Johnston, Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets (2007) 174
orpheus, see also katabasis, orphic orpheus of camarina Graf and Johnston, Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets (2007) 174
orpheus, transmitter of mysteries de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 58
orpheus, visits the underworld Graf and Johnston, Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets (2007) 174
orpheus de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 58
osiris de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 58
phanes / protogonos de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 58
theseus' Graf and Johnston, Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets (2007) 174
titans, crime de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 58