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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



4471
Diodorus Siculus, Historical Library, 1.23.7


nan And since he had become conversant with the teachings of the Egyptians about the gods, he transferred the birth of the ancient Osiris to more recent times, and, out of regard for the descendants of Cadmus, instituted a new initiation, in the ritual of which the initiates were given the account that Dionysus had been born of Semelê and Zeus. And the people observed these initiatory rites, partly because they were deceived through their ignorance, partly because they were attracted to them by the trustworthiness of Orpheus and his reputation in such matters, and most of all because they were glad to receive the god as a Greek, which, as has been said, is what he was considered to be.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

12 results
1. Herodotus, Histories, 2.81 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

2.81. They wear linen tunics with fringes hanging about the legs, called “calasiris,” and loose white woolen mantles over these. But nothing woolen is brought into temples, or buried with them: that is impious. ,They agree in this with practices called Orphic and Bacchic, but in fact Egyptian and Pythagorean: for it is impious, too, for one partaking of these rites to be buried in woolen wrappings. There is a sacred legend about this.
2. Diodorus Siculus, Historical Library, 1.22.7, 1.23.6, 1.69.3-1.69.4, 1.96, 4.25.3, 5.75.4 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.22.7.  Consequently the Greeks too, inasmuch as they received from Egypt the celebrations of the orgies and the festivals connected with Dionysus, honour this member in both the mysteries and the initiatory rites and sacrifices of this god, giving it the name "phallus. 1.23.6.  The fatherhood of the child he attributed to Zeus, in this way magnifying Osiris and averting slander from his violated daughter; and this is the reason why the tale was given out among the Greeks to the effect that Semelê, the daughter of Cadmus, was the mother of Osiris by Zeus. Now at a later time Orpheus, who was held in high regard among the Greeks for his singing, initiatory rites, and instructions on things divine, was entertained as a guest by the descendants of Cadmus and accorded unusual honours in Thebes. 1.69.3.  and for that reason those men who have won the greatest repute in intellectual things have been eager to visit Egypt in order to acquaint themselves with its laws and institutions, which they considered to be worthy of note. 1.69.4.  For despite the fact that for the reasons mentioned above strangers found it difficult in early times to enter the country, it was nevertheless eagerly visited by Orpheus and the poet Homer in the earliest times and in later times by many others, such as Pythagoras of Samos and Solon the lawgiver. 1.96. 1.  But now that we have examined these matters, we must enumerate what Greeks, who have won fame for their wisdom and learning, visited Egypt in ancient times, in order to become acquainted with its customs and learning.,2.  For the priests of Egypt recount from the records of their sacred books that they were visited in early times by Orpheus, Musaeus, Melampus, and Daedalus, also by the poet Homer and Lycurgus of Sparta, later by Solon of Athens and the philosopher Plato, and that there also came Pythagoras of Samos and the mathematician Eudoxus, as well as Democritus of Abdera and Oenopides of Chios.,3.  As evidence for the visits of all these men they point in some cases to their statues and in others to places or buildings which bear their names, and they offer proofs from the branch of learning which each one of these men pursued, arguing that all the things for which they were admired among the Greeks were transferred from Egypt.,4.  Orpheus, for instance, brought from Egypt most of his mystic ceremonies, the orgiastic rites that accompanied his wanderings, and his fabulous account of his experiences in Hades.,5.  For the rite of Osiris is the same as that of Dionysus and that of Isis very similar to that of Demeter, the names alone having been interchanged; and the punishments in Hades of the unrighteous, the Fields of the Righteous, and the fantastic conceptions, current among the many, which are figments of the imagination — all these were introduced by Orpheus in imitation of the Egyptian funeral customs.,6.  Hermes, for instance, the Conductor of Souls, according to the ancient Egyptian custom, brings up the body of the Apis to a certain point and then gives it over to one who wears the mask of Cerberus. And after Orpheus had introduced this notion among the Greeks, Homer followed it when he wrote: Cyllenian Hermes then did summon forth The suitors's souls, holding his wand in hand. And again a little further on he says: They passed Oceanus' streams, the Gleaming Rock, The Portals of the Sun, the Land of Dreams; And now they reached the Meadow of Asphodel, Where dwell the Souls, the shades of men outworn.,7.  Now he calls the river "Oceanus" because in their language the Egyptians speak of the Nile as Oceanus; the "Portals of the Sun" (Heliopulai) is his name for the city of Heliopolis; and "Meadows," the mythical dwelling of the dead, is his term for the place near the lake which is called Acherousia, which is near Memphis, and around it are fairest meadows, of a marsh-land and lotus and reeds. The same explanation also serves for the statement that the dwelling of the dead is in these regions, since the most and the largest tombs of the Egyptians are situated there, the dead being ferried across both the river and Lake Acherousia and their bodies laid in the vaults situated there.,8.  The other myths about Hades, current among the Greeks, also agree with the customs which are practised even now in Egypt. For the boat which receives the bodies is called baris, and the passenger's fee is given to the boatman, who in the Egyptian tongue is called charon.,9.  And near these regions, they say, are also the "Shades," which is a temple of Hecate, and "portals" of Cocytus and Lethe, which are covered at intervals with bands of bronze. There are, moreover, other portals, namely, those of Truth, and near them stands a headless statue of Justice. 4.25.3.  And after he had devoted his entire time to his education and had learned whatever the myths had to say about the gods, he journeyed to Egypt, where he further increased his knowledge and so became the greatest man among the Greeks both for his knowledge of the gods and for their rites, as well as for his poems and songs. 5.75.4.  As for Dionysus, the myths state that he discovered the vine and its cultivation, and also how to make wine and to store away many of the autumn fruits and thus to provide mankind with the use of them as food over a long time. This god was born in Crete, men say, of Zeus and Persephonê, and Orpheus has handed down the tradition in the initiatory rites that he was torn in pieces by the Titans. And the fact is that there have been several who bore the name Dionysus, regarding whom we have given a detailed account at greater length in connection with the more appropriate period of time.
3. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 6.114 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

4. Athenagoras, Apology Or Embassy For The Christians, 20.3 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

5. Clement of Alexandria, Exhortation To The Greeks, 2.16.1-2.16.2 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

6. Hippolytus, Refutation of All Heresies, 5.20.4 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

7. Tatian, Oration To The Greeks, 10.1 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

8. Arnobius, Against The Gentiles, 5.21 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

9. Nonnus, Dionysiaca, 5.565, 6.155-6.157 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

10. Orphic Hymns., Fragments, 44, 47, 578, 87, 89, 98, 398

11. Orphic Hymns., Hymni, 30.6-30.7

12. Papyri, Derveni Papyrus, 5.10, 20.2, 22.12, 26.9



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
cosmogony Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 137
death of dionysus Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 137
demeter Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 137
derveni author Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 137
derveni papyrus, first columns Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 137
destiny, of souls Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 137
dionysus, birth of dionysus Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 137
dionysus Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 137
egypt/egyptian de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 57
gods, births of the gods Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 137
initiates, hope of the initiates Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 137
initiates Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 137
knowledge, acquired in the initiation Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 137
mystery cults Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 137
orpheus, literary author de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 57
orpheus, transmitter of mysteries de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 57
orpheus Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 137
orphic, see hieros logos de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 57
orphic myths Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 137
orphic poems Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 137
orphic rites Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 137
osiris de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 57
persephone Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 137
persephones birth Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 137
priests, priestess de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 57
rhea Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 137
rites, ritual de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 57
rites, rituals Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 137
theology, theologians de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 57
titan's crime" '328.0_137.0@δρώμενα Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 137
zeus Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 137
zeus incest with his mother Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 137
λεγόμενα' Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 137