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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



4458
Dio Chrysostom, Orations, 3.6


nan For in the case of the generality of men, those either in private station or holding some petty office, the individual's personal fortune is of slight account and concerns himself alone; but let untold cities yield obedience to a man, let countless nations be governed by his judgment, let tribes of men unnumbered and hostile to one another look to his prudence alone, and that man becomes the saviour and protector of men everywhere — that is, if such be his type. <


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

19 results
1. Dio Chrysostom, Orations, 1.18, 1.23, 1.40, 1.42, 1.60, 1.62-1.63, 1.84, 2.6, 2.50-2.51, 3.2-3.3, 3.5, 3.7-3.8, 3.45, 12.27, 12.34, 12.75, 31.149, 32.35-32.36, 32.47, 36.31, 36.38, 38.43, 40.36, 48.7, 62.1 (1st cent. CE

3.5.  when that man, I say, is at once a judge more observant of the law than an empanelled jury, a king of greater equity than the responsible magistrates in our cities, a general more courageous than the soldiers in the ranks, a man more assiduous in all his tasks than those who are forced to work, less covetous of luxury than those who have no means to indulge in luxury, kindlier to his subjects than a loving father to his children, more dreaded by his enemies than are the invincible and irresistible gods — how can one deny that such a man's fortune is a blessing, not to himself alone, but to all others as well? 3.45.  The three most conspicuous forms of government — governments based on law and justice and enjoying the favour of heaven and fortune — are expressly named. One is the first to come into existence and the most practicable — that which forms the subject of the present address — where we have a city, or a number of peoples, or the whole world, well ordered by one good man's judgment and virtue; second, the so‑called "aristocracy 12.27.  Now concerning the nature of the gods in general, and especially that of the ruler of the universe, first and foremost an idea regarding him and a conception of him common to the whole human race, to the Greeks and to the barbarians alike, a conception that is inevitable and innate in every creature endowed with reason, arising in the course of nature without the aid of human teacher and free from the deceit of any expounding priest, has made its way, and it rendered manifest God's kinship with man and furnished many evidences of the truth, which did not suffer the earliest and most ancient men to doze and grow indifferent to them; 31.149.  You remember the notorious Acratus, who visited practically the whole inhabited world in this quest and passed by no village even — you recall how he came here likewise, and when you were, quite naturally, distressed, he said he had come to see the sights, for he had no authority to touch anything here. Therefore, apart from the beautiful sight which all the world may enjoy, the great number of your statues brings you a renown of another sort! For these things are manifestly a proof of your friendship for your rulers and of their respect for you. 32.35.  But to take just that topic which I mentioned in the beginning, see how important it is. For how you dine in private, how you sleep, how you manage your household, these are matters in which as individuals you are not at all conspicuous; on the other hand, how you behave as spectators and what you are like in the theatre are matters of common knowledge among Greeks and barbarians alike. For your city is vastly superior in point of size and situation, and it is admittedly ranked second among all cities beneath the sun. 32.36.  For not only does the mighty nation, Egypt, constitute the framework of your city — or more accurately its ')" onMouseOut="nd();"appendage — but the peculiar nature of the river, when compared with all others, defies description with regard to both its marvellous habits and its usefulness; and furthermore, not only have you a monopoly of the shipping of the entire Mediterranean by reason of the beauty of your harbours, the magnitude of your fleet, and the abundance and the marketing of the products of every land, but also the outer waters that lie beyond are in your grasp, both the Red Sea and the Indian Ocean, whose name was rarely heard in former days. The result is that the trade, not merely of islands, ports, a few straits and isthmuses, but of practically the whole world is yours. For Alexandria is situated, as it were, at the cross-roads of the whole world, of even the most remote nations thereof, as if it were a market serving a single city, a market which brings together into one place all manner of men, displaying them to one another and, as far as possible, making them a kindred people. 36.31.  "This doctrine, in brief, aims to harmonize the human race with the divine, and to embrace in a single term everything endowed with reason, finding in reason the only sure and indissoluble foundation for fellowship and justice. For in keeping with that concept the term 'city' would be applied, not, of course, to an organization that has chanced to get mean or petty leaders nor to one which through tyranny or democracy or, in fact, through decarchy or oligarchy or any other similar product of imperfection, is being torn to pieces and made the victim of constant party faction. Nay, term would be applied rather to an organization that is governed by the sanest and noblest form of kingship, to one that is actually under royal goverce in accordance with law, in complete friendship and concord. 36.38.  "This, then, is the theory of the philosophers, a theory which sets up a noble and benevolent fellowship of gods and men which gives a share in law and citizenship, not to all living beings whatsoever, but only to such as have a share in reason and intellect, introducing a far better and more righteous code than that of Sparta, in accordance with which the Helots have no prospect of ever becoming Spartans, and consequently are constantly plotting against Sparta. 38.43.  Furthermore, that which is the aim of all human action, pleasure, becomes greater than tongue can tell. For to achieve, on the one hand, the elimination of the things which cause you pain — envy and rivalry and the strife which is their outcome, your plotting against one another, your gloating over the misfortunes of your neighbours, your vexation at their good fortune — and, on the other hand, the introduction into your cities of their opposites — sharing in things which are good, unity of heart and mind, rejoicing of both peoples in the same things — does not all this resemble a public festival? 48.7.  Yes, it is a fine thing, just as it is with a well-trained chorus, for men to sing together one and the same tune, and not, like a bad musical instrument, to be discordant, emitting two kinds of notes and sounds as a result of twofold and varied natures, for in such discord, I venture to say, there is found not only contempt and misfortune but also utter impotence both among themselves and in their dealings with the proconsuls. For no one can readily hear what is being said either when choruses are discordant or when cities are at variance. Again, just as it is not possible, I fancy, for persons sailing in one ship each to obtain safety separately, but rather all together, so it is also with men who are members of one state. 62.1. And indeed, if a person is not competent to govern a single man, and that too a man who is very close to him, in fact his constant companion, and if, again, he cannot guide a single soul, and that his own, how could he be king, as you are, over unnumbered thousands scattered everywhere, many even dwelling at the ends of the earth, most of whom he has not even seen and never could see, and whose speech he will not understand? Why, it is as if one were to say of the man with vision so impaired that he cannot see even what lies at his feet but needs some one to lead him by the hand, that he can reach with his eyes the most distant objects, like those who at sea behold from afar both the mountains and the islands; or as if one were to say of the man who cannot make himself heard even by those who stand beside him, that he is able to speak so as to be heard by whole communities and armies.
2. New Testament, 1 Peter, 2.13, 2.17 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

2.13. Therefore subject yourselves to every ordice of man for the Lord's sake: whether to the king, as supreme; 2.17. Honor all men. Love the brotherhood. Fear God. Honor the king.
3. New Testament, Acts, 12.1, 12.20-12.21, 13.1, 17.7, 25.8, 25.10-25.14, 25.21, 25.25-25.26, 26.2, 26.19, 26.27, 26.32, 27.24, 28.19 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

12.1. Now about that time, Herod the king stretched out his hands to oppress some of the assembly. 12.20. Now Herod was highly displeased with those of Tyre and Sidon. They came with one accord to him, and, having made Blastus, the king's chamberlain, their friend, they asked for peace, because their country depended on the king's country for food. 12.21. On an appointed day, Herod dressed himself in royal clothing, sat on the throne, and gave a speech to them. 13.1. Now in the assembly that was at Antioch there were some prophets and teachers: Barnabas, Simeon who was called Niger, Lucius of Cyrene, Manaen the foster-brother of Herod the tetrarch, and Saul. 17.7. whom Jason has received. These all act contrary to the decrees of Caesar, saying that there is another king, Jesus! 25.8. while he said in his defense, "Neither against the law of the Jews, nor against the temple, nor against Caesar, have I sinned at all. 25.10. But Paul said, "I am standing before Caesar's judgment seat, where I ought to be tried. I have done no wrong to the Jews, as you also know very well. 25.11. For if I have done wrong, and have committed anything worthy of death, I don't refuse to die; but if none of those things is true that these accuse me of, no one can give me up to them. I appeal to Caesar! 25.12. Then Festus, when he had conferred with the council, answered, "You have appealed to Caesar. To Caesar you will go. 25.13. Now when some days had passed, Agrippa the King and Bernice arrived at Caesarea, and greeted Festus. 25.14. As they stayed there many days, Festus laid Paul's case before the King, saying, "There is a certain man left a prisoner by Felix; 25.21. But when Paul had appealed to be kept for the decision of the emperor, I commanded him to be kept until I could send him to Caesar. 25.25. But when I found that he had committed nothing worthy of death, and as he himself appealed to the emperor I determined to send him. 25.26. of whom I have no certain thing to write to my lord. Therefore I have brought him forth before you, and especially before you, king Agrippa, that, after examination, I may have something to write. 26.2. I think myself happy, King Agrippa, that I am to make my defense before you this day concerning all the things whereof I am accused by the Jews 26.19. Therefore, King Agrippa, I was not disobedient to the heavenly vision 26.27. King Agrippa, do you believe the prophets? I know that you believe. 26.32. Agrippa said to Festus, "This man might have been set free if he had not appealed to Caesar. 27.24. saying, 'Don't be afraid, Paul. You must stand before Caesar. Behold, God has granted you all those who sail with you.' 28.19. But when the Jews spoke against it, I was constrained to appeal to Caesar, not that I had anything about which to accuse my nation.
4. New Testament, Apocalypse, 17.9 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

17.9. Here is the mind that has wisdom. The seven heads are seven mountains, on which the woman sits.
5. New Testament, Philippians, 4.22 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

4.22. All the saints greet you, especially those who are of Caesar's household.
6. New Testament, John, 4.49, 19.12, 19.15 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

4.49. The nobleman said to him, "Sir, come down before my child dies. 19.12. At this, Pilate was seeking to release him, but the Jews cried out, saying, "If you release this man, you aren't Caesar's friend! Everyone who makes himself a king speaks against Caesar! 19.15. They cried out, "Away with him! Away with him! Crucify him!"Pilate said to them, "Shall I crucify your King?"The chief priests answered, "We have no king but Caesar!
7. New Testament, Luke, 1.5, 2.1, 3.1, 7.1-7.10, 20.22, 20.24-20.25, 23.2 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

1.5. There was in the days of Herod, the king of Judea, a certain priest named Zacharias, of the priestly division of Abijah. He had a wife of the daughters of Aaron, and her name was Elizabeth. 2.1. Now it happened in those days, that a decree went out from Caesar Augustus that all the world should be enrolled. 3.1. Now in the fifteenth year of the reign of Tiberius Caesar, Pontius Pilate being governor of Judea, and Herod being tetrarch of Galilee, and his brother Philip tetrarch of the region of Ituraea and Trachonitis, and Lysanias tetrarch of Abilene 7.1. After he had finished speaking in the hearing of the people, he entered into Capernaum. 7.2. A certain centurion's servant, who was dear to him, was sick and at the point of death. 7.3. When he heard about Jesus, he sent to him elders of the Jews, asking him to come and save his servant. 7.4. When they came to Jesus, they begged him earnestly, saying, "He is worthy for you to do this for him 7.5. for he loves our nation, and he built our synagogue for us. 7.6. Jesus went with them. When he was now not far from the house, the centurion sent friends to him, saying to him, "Lord, don't trouble yourself, for I am not worthy for you to come under my roof. 7.7. Therefore I didn't even think myself worthy to come to you; but say the word, and my servant will be healed. 7.8. For I also am a man placed under authority, having under myself soldiers. I tell this one, 'Go!' and he goes; and to another, 'Come!' and he comes; and to my servant, 'Do this,' and he does it. 7.9. When Jesus heard these things, he marveled at him, and turned and said to the multitude who followed him, "I tell you, I have not found such great faith, no, not in Israel. 7.10. Those who were sent, returning to the house, found that the servant who had been sick was well. 20.22. Is it lawful for us to pay taxes to Caesar, or not? 20.24. Show me a denarius. Whose image and inscription are on it?"They answered, "Caesar's. 20.25. He said to them, "Then give to Caesar the things that are Caesar's, and to God the things that are God's. 23.2. They began to accuse him, saying, "We found this man perverting the nation, forbidding paying taxes to Caesar, and saying that he himself is Christ, a king.
8. New Testament, Mark, 6.14, 6.25, 12.14, 12.16-12.17 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

6.14. King Herod heard this, for his name had become known, and he said, "John the Baptizer has risen from the dead, and therefore these powers are at work in him. 6.25. She came in immediately with haste to the king, and asked, "I want you to give me right now the head of John the Baptizer on a platter. 12.14. When they had come, they asked him, "Teacher, we know that you are honest, and don't defer to anyone; for you aren't partial to anyone, but truly teach the way of God. Is it lawful to pay taxes to Caesar, or not? 12.16. They brought it. He said to them, "Whose is this image and inscription?"They said to him, "Caesar's. 12.17. Jesus answered them, "Render to Caesar the things that are Caesar's, and to God the things that are God's."They marveled greatly at him.
9. New Testament, Matthew, 2.1, 2.3, 7.28, 8.5-8.10, 8.13, 22.17, 22.21 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

2.1. Now when Jesus was born in Bethlehem of Judea in the days of Herod the king, behold, wise men from the east came to Jerusalem, saying 2.3. When Herod the king heard it, he was troubled, and all Jerusalem with him. 7.28. It happened, when Jesus had finished saying these things, that the multitudes were astonished at his teaching 8.5. When he came into Capernaum, a centurion came to him, asking him 8.6. and saying, "Lord, my servant lies in the house paralyzed, grievously tormented. 8.7. Jesus said to him, "I will come and heal him. 8.8. The centurion answered, "Lord, I'm not worthy for you to come under my roof. Just say the word, and my servant will be healed. 8.9. For I am also a man under authority, having under myself soldiers. I tell this one, 'Go,' and he goes; and to another, 'Come,' and he comes; and to my servant, 'Do this,' and he does it. 8.10. When Jesus heard it, he marveled, and said to those who followed, "Most assuredly I tell you, I haven't found so great a faith, not even in Israel. 8.13. Jesus said to the centurion, "Go your way. Let it be done for you as you as you have believed." His servant was healed in that hour. 22.17. Tell us therefore, what do you think? Is it lawful to pay taxes to Caesar, or not? 22.21. They said to him, "Caesar's."Then he said to them, "Give therefore to Caesar the things that are Caesar's, and to God the things that are God's.
10. Pliny The Elder, Natural History, 7.97 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

11. Seneca The Younger, De Clementia, 1.7.2, 1.8.6 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

12. Tacitus, Annals, 15.45.1-15.45.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

15.45.1.  Meanwhile, Italy had been laid waste for contributions of money; the provinces, the federate communities, and the so‑called free states, were ruined. The gods themselves formed part of the plunder, as the ravaged temples of the capital were drained of the gold dedicated in the triumphs or the vows, the prosperity or the fears, of the Roman nation at every epoch. But in Asia and Achaia, not offerings alone but the images of deity were being swept away, since Acratus and Carrinas Secundus had been despatched into the two provinces. The former was a freedman prepared for any enormity; the latter, as far as words went, was a master of Greek philosophy, but his character remained untinctured by the virtues. Seneca, it was rumoured, to divert the odium of sacrilege from himself, had asked leave to retire to a distant estate in the country, and, when it was not accorded, had feigned illness — a neuralgic affection, he said — and declined to leave his bedroom. Some have put it on record that, by the orders of Nero, poison had been prepared for him by one of his freedmen, Cleonicus by name; and that, owing either to the man's revelations or to his own alarms, it was avoided by Seneca, who supported life upon an extremely simple diet of field fruits and, if thirst was insistent, spring water.
13. Aelius Aristides, Orations, 26.11-26.13, 26.59-26.62 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

14. Anon., Marytrdom of Polycarp, 8.2 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

8.2. 2 And the police captain Herod and his father Niketas met him and removed him into their carriage, and sat by his side trying to persuade him and saying: "But what harm is it to say, `Lord Caesar,' and to offer sacrifice, and so forth, and to be saved?" But he at first did not answer them, but when they continued he said: "I am not going to do what you counsel me.
15. Clement of Alexandria, Exhortation To The Greeks, 4.49.1 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

16. Tertullian, To The Heathen, 1.17.2-1.17.3 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

17. Tertullian, Apology, 21.24, 35.3-35.13 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

18. Theophilus, To Autolycus, 1.11 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

1.11. Wherefore I will rather honour the king [than your gods], not, indeed, worshipping him, but praying for him. But God, the living and true God, I worship, knowing that the king is made by Him. You will say, then, to me, Why do you not worship the king? Because he is not made to be worshipped, but to be reverenced with lawful honour, for he is not a god, but a man appointed by God, not to be worshipped, but to judge justly. For in a kind of way his government is committed to him by God: as He will not have those called kings whom He has appointed under Himself; for king is his title, and it is not lawful for another to use it; so neither is it lawful for any to be worshipped but God only. Wherefore, O man, you are wholly in error. Accordingly, honour the king, be subject to him, and pray for him with loyal mind; for if you do this, you do the will of God. For the law that is of God, says, My son, fear the Lord and the king, and be not disobedient to them; for suddenly they shall take vengeance on their enemies.
19. Eusebius of Caesarea, Ecclesiastical History, 5.5.4 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

5.5.4. Among these is Apolinarius, who says that from that time the legion through whose prayers the wonder took place received from the emperor a title appropriate to the event, being called in the language of the Romans the Thundering Legion.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
acratus Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 76
ailios aristeides Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 76, 176
alexandria (egypt) Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 76
apameia Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 76
caesars, roman Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 76, 103, 176
cicero Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 103
civil discord Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 410
claudius apollinaris Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 176
clothing Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 410
deception Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 410
destruction/ruin Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 410
dio chrysostom Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 410
dio chrysostom (of prusa) Jażdżewska and Doroszewski,Plutarch and his Contemporaries: Sharing the Roman Empire (2024) 53
diodoros sikeliotes Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 176
dion of prousa Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 76, 103, 176
dion of syracuse Jażdżewska and Doroszewski,Plutarch and his Contemporaries: Sharing the Roman Empire (2024) 53
education Jażdżewska and Doroszewski,Plutarch and his Contemporaries: Sharing the Roman Empire (2024) 53
epiktetos Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 176
flattery Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 410
galba Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 76
god, gods Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 103
heracles Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 410
historiography, roman Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 410
homer Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 410
hubris Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 410
humankind, unity of Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 76, 103
isocrates Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 410
koinonia Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 103
nero Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 76
new testament Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 176
oikeiosis Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 103
oikoumene Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 76
pericles Jażdżewska and Doroszewski,Plutarch and his Contemporaries: Sharing the Roman Empire (2024) 53
philip ii (king of macedon) Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 410
plato Jażdżewska and Doroszewski,Plutarch and his Contemporaries: Sharing the Roman Empire (2024) 53
plutarch Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 176
pompeius magnus, cn. Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 76
pythagoras Jażdżewska and Doroszewski,Plutarch and his Contemporaries: Sharing the Roman Empire (2024) 53
roman empire, unity of the Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 176
ruler Jażdżewska and Doroszewski,Plutarch and his Contemporaries: Sharing the Roman Empire (2024) 53
seneca the younger Jażdżewska and Doroszewski,Plutarch and his Contemporaries: Sharing the Roman Empire (2024) 53
toil Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 410
tyranny/despotism Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 410
tyrants Jażdżewska and Doroszewski,Plutarch and his Contemporaries: Sharing the Roman Empire (2024) 53
virtue Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 410
virtues' Jażdżewska and Doroszewski,Plutarch and his Contemporaries: Sharing the Roman Empire (2024) 53
zeus Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 103