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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



4458
Dio Chrysostom, Orations, 3.2-3.3


nan Now Socrates thought that because he did not know the Persian king's inner life, he did not know his state of happiness either. I, however, most noble Prince, have been in your company and am perhaps as well acquainted with your character as anyone, and know that you delight in truth and frankness rather than in flattery and guile. <


nan To begin with, you suspect irrational pleasures just as you do flattering men, and you endure hardship because you believe that it puts virtue to the test. And when I see you, O Prince, perusing the works of the ancients and comprehending their wise and close reasoning, I maintain that you are clearly a blessed man in that you wield a power second only to that of the gods and nevertheless use that power most nobly. <


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

10 results
1. Dio Chrysostom, Orations, 1.1-1.2, 1.11-1.36, 1.78-1.82, 1.84, 2.50-2.51, 2.64, 2.75, 3.1, 3.3, 3.5-3.8, 3.25, 3.37, 3.40-3.42, 3.83-3.84, 3.87-3.90, 3.93, 3.116, 4.135, 7.66, 8.29, 9.9, 11.150, 32.94, 62.6 (1st cent. CE

2.75.  In like manner do the gods act, and especially the great King of Kings, Zeus, who is the common protector and father of men and gods. If any man proves himself a violent, unjust and lawless ruler, visiting his strength, not upon the enemy, but upon his subjects and friends; if he is insatiate of pleasures, insatiate of wealth, quick to suspect, implacable in anger, keen for slander, deaf to reason, knavish, treacherous, degraded, wilful, exalting the wicked, envious of his superiors, too stupid for education, regarding no man as friend nor having one, as though such a possession were beneath him, — 3.1.  When Socrates, who, as you also know by tradition, lived many years ago, was passing his old age in poverty at Athens, he was asked by someone whether he considered the Persian king a happy man, and replied, "Perhaps so"; but he added that he did not really know, since he had never met him and had no knowledge of his character, implying, no doubt, that a man's happiness is not determined by any external possessions, such as gold plate, cities or lands, for example, or other human beings, but in each case by his own self and his own character. 3.5.  when that man, I say, is at once a judge more observant of the law than an empanelled jury, a king of greater equity than the responsible magistrates in our cities, a general more courageous than the soldiers in the ranks, a man more assiduous in all his tasks than those who are forced to work, less covetous of luxury than those who have no means to indulge in luxury, kindlier to his subjects than a loving father to his children, more dreaded by his enemies than are the invincible and irresistible gods — how can one deny that such a man's fortune is a blessing, not to himself alone, but to all others as well? 3.25.  Accordingly, that I may not be open to the charge of flattery by my would‑be detractors, and that you on your part may not be accused of a wanting to be praised to your very face, I shall speak of the ideal king, of what sort he should be, and how he differs from the man who pretends to be a ruler but is in reality far from true dominion and kingship. 4.135.  Again, the spirit that loves distinction counsels and encourages him to sacrifice all that he has for the sake of honour, but the other spirit opposes and blocks this one. And indeed, the lover of pleasure and the lover of fame can never be in accord or say the same thing; for the one despises fame, thinks it nonsense, and often cites the lines of Sardanapallus: 'What I have eaten and wantoned, the joys I have had of my amours, These alone have I now. The rest of my blessings have vanished.' 8.29.  "They have an idea, too, that Eurystheus had him in his power and ordered him about, Eurystheus, whom they considered a worthless fellow and to whom no one ever prayed or sacrificed. Heracles, however, roved over all Europe and Asia, though he did not look at all like any of these athletes; 11.150.  Perhaps, however, some uninformed person may say, "It is not right for you to disparage the Greeks in this way." Well, the situation has changed and there is no longer any fear of an Asiatic people ever marching against Greece. For Greece is subject to others and so is Asia. Besides, the truth is worth a great deal. And in addition to all this, had I known that my words would carry conviction, perhaps I should have decided not to speak at all. But nevertheless I maintain that I have freed the Greeks from reproaches greater and more distressing. 32.94.  Just as in the case of comedies and revues when the poets bring upon the scene a drunken Carion or a Davus, they do not arouse much laughter, yet the sight of a Heracles in that condition does seem comical, a Heracles who staggers and, as usually portrayed, is clad in womanish saffron; in much the same way also, if a populace of such size as yours warbles all through life or, it may be, plays charioteer without the horses, it becomes a disgrace and a laughing stock. Indeed this is precisely what Euripides says befell Heracles in his madness: Then striding to a car he thought was there, He stepped within its rails and dealt a blow, As if he held the goad within his hand.
2. Epictetus, Discourses, 3.22.94, 3.24.107, 3.24.117, 3.26.29 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

3. Plutarch, Agesilaus, 33.4 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

4. Plutarch, Comparison of Aemilius Paulus And Timoleon, 2.3 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

5. Plutarch, Comparison of Aristides And Cato, 1.3 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

6. Plutarch, Comparison of Lysander With Sulla, 5.5 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

7. Plutarch, Demetrius, 1.7, 3.3 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

8. Plutarch, Galba, 2.1 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

9. Plutarch, Moralia, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

10. Plutarch, Precepts of Statecraft, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

814c. it is even now possible to resemble our ancestors, but Marathon, the Eurymedon, Plataea, and all the other examples which make the common folk vainly to swell with pride and kick up their heels, should be left to the schools of the sophists. And not only should the statesman show himself and his native State blameless towards our rulers, but he should also have always a friend among the men of high station who have the greatest power as a firm bulwark, so to speak, of his administration; for the Romans themselves are most eager to promote the political interests of their friends; and it is a fine thing also, when we gain advantage from the friendship of great men, to turn it to the welfare of our community, as Polybius and Panaetius, through Scipio's goodwill towards them


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
alexander Fleury and Schmidt, Perceptions of the Second Sophistic and Its Times - Regards sur la Seconde Sophistique et son époque(2010) 110
alexander iii of makedon Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 73
barbaroi, vs.greeks Fleury and Schmidt, Perceptions of the Second Sophistic and Its Times - Regards sur la Seconde Sophistique et son époque(2010) 110
barbaroi Fleury and Schmidt, Perceptions of the Second Sophistic and Its Times - Regards sur la Seconde Sophistique et son époque(2010) 110
basileus, bon/mauvais roi Fleury and Schmidt, Perceptions of the Second Sophistic and Its Times - Regards sur la Seconde Sophistique et son époque(2010) 110
civil discord Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 410
clothing Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 410
darius Fleury and Schmidt, Perceptions of the Second Sophistic and Its Times - Regards sur la Seconde Sophistique et son époque(2010) 110
deception Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 410
destruction/ruin Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 410
dio chrysostom Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 410
dio chrysostomus Fleury and Schmidt, Perceptions of the Second Sophistic and Its Times - Regards sur la Seconde Sophistique et son époque(2010) 110, 117
domitian Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 73
epidictic (genre) Fleury and Schmidt, Perceptions of the Second Sophistic and Its Times - Regards sur la Seconde Sophistique et son époque(2010) 110
flattery Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 410
graeci Fleury and Schmidt, Perceptions of the Second Sophistic and Its Times - Regards sur la Seconde Sophistique et son époque(2010) 110
heracles Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 410
historiography, roman Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 410
homer Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 410
hubris Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 410
isocrates Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 410
luxe Fleury and Schmidt, Perceptions of the Second Sophistic and Its Times - Regards sur la Seconde Sophistique et son époque(2010) 110
narration/narrative Fleury and Schmidt, Perceptions of the Second Sophistic and Its Times - Regards sur la Seconde Sophistique et son époque(2010) 117
otho Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 73
persae Fleury and Schmidt, Perceptions of the Second Sophistic and Its Times - Regards sur la Seconde Sophistique et son époque(2010) 110
philip ii (king of macedon) Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 410
plutarch Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 73
roman empire as a unit Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 73
sardanapalus Fleury and Schmidt, Perceptions of the Second Sophistic and Its Times - Regards sur la Seconde Sophistique et son époque(2010) 110
sparta Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 73
tiberius Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 73
toil Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 410
trajan Fleury and Schmidt, Perceptions of the Second Sophistic and Its Times - Regards sur la Seconde Sophistique et son époque(2010) 110; Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 73
tyrannos' Fleury and Schmidt, Perceptions of the Second Sophistic and Its Times - Regards sur la Seconde Sophistique et son époque(2010) 110
tyranny/despotism Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 410
vespasian Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 73
virtue Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 410
xerxes Fleury and Schmidt, Perceptions of the Second Sophistic and Its Times - Regards sur la Seconde Sophistique et son époque(2010) 110