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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



4413
Demosthenes, Orations, 60.27


nanThe considerations that actuated these men one and all to choose to die nobly have now been enumerated,—birth, education, habituation to high standards of conduct, and the underlying principles of our form of government in general. The incentives that challenged them severally to be valiant men, depending upon the tribes to which they belonged, I shall next relate. The list which here begins is our chief authority for the names and order of precedence of the ten Athenian tribes as established by Cleisthenes in 508 B.C. The particular myths that suit the context, however, are for the most part obscure and of relatively recent origin. For example, the older legends speak of but one daughter of Erechtheus as being sacrificed. The later version is known to Cicero Tusc. Disp. 1.48.116 . All the Erechtheidae were well aware that Erechtheus, from whom they have their name, for the salvation of this land gave his own daughters, whom they call Hyacinthides, to certain death, and so extinguished his race. Therefore they regarded it as shameful, after a being born of immortal gods had sacrificed everything for the liberation of his native land, that they themselves should have been found to have placed a higher value upon a mortal body than upon immortal glory. Hyp. 24 reads in part θνητοῦ σώματος ἀθάνατον δόξαν ἐκτήσαντο, gained immortal glory at the price of a mortal body.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

17 results
1. Aristophanes, Wasps, 566 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

566. οἱ δὲ λέγουσιν μύθους ἡμῖν, οἱ δ' Αἰσώπου τι γέλοιον:
2. Euripides, Ion, 1163-1164, 1220, 277, 10 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

10. there did Phoebus force his love on Creusa, daughter of Erechtheus, beneath the rock of Pallas, northward of Athens’ steep realm, called Macrae by the kings of Attica. And she without her father’s knowledge—for such was the god’s good pleasure,—
3. Herodotus, Histories, 5.66.2, 7.189 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

5.66.2. These men with their factions fell to contending for power, Cleisthenes was getting the worst of it in this dispute and took the commons into his party. Presently he divided the Athenians into ten tribes instead of four as formerly. He called none after the names of the sons of Ion—Geleon, Aegicores, Argades, and Hoples—but invented for them names taken from other heroes, all native to the country except Aias. Him he added despite the fact that he was a stranger because he was a neighbor and an ally. 7.189. The story is told that because of an oracle the Athenians invoked Boreas, the north wind, to help them, since another oracle told them to summon their son-in-law as an ally. According to the Hellenic story, Boreas had an Attic wife, Orithyia, the daughter of Erechtheus, ancient king of Athens. ,Because of this connection, so the tale goes, the Athenians considered Boreas to be their son-in-law. They were stationed off Chalcis in Euboea, and when they saw the storm rising, they then, if they had not already, sacrificed to and called upon Boreas and Orithyia to help them by destroying the barbarian fleet, just as before at Athos. ,I cannot say whether this was the cause of Boreas falling upon the barbarians as they lay at anchor, but the Athenians say that he had come to their aid before and that he was the agent this time. When they went home, they founded a sacred precinct of Boreas beside the Ilissus river.
4. Isocrates, Orations, 9.57 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

5. Lysias, Orations, 2.18, 2.61 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

6. Plato, Menexenus, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

7. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 1.24, 2.15.1, 2.43.1 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

2.15.1. From very early times this had been more the case with the Athenians than with others. Under Cecrops and the first kings, down to the reign of Theseus, Attica had always consisted of a number of independent townships, each with its own town-hall and magistrates. Except in times of danger the king at Athens was not consulted; in ordinary seasons they carried on their government and settled their affairs without his interference; sometimes even they waged war against him, as in the case of the Eleusinians with Eumolpus against Erechtheus. 2.43.1. So died these men as became Athenians. You, their survivors, must determine to have as unaltering a resolution in the field, though you may pray that it may have a happier issue. And not contented with ideas derived only from words of the advantages which are bound up with the defence of your country, though these would furnish a valuable text to a speaker even before an audience so alive to them as the present, you must yourselves realize the power of Athens, and feed your eyes upon her from day to day, till love of her fills your hearts; and then when all her greatness shall break upon you, you must reflect that it was by courage, sense of duty, and a keen feeling of honor in action that men were enabled to win all this, and that no personal failure in an enterprise could make them consent to deprive their country of their valor, but they laid it at her feet as the most glorious contribution that they could offer.
8. Xenophon, Memoirs, 3.5.10 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

3.5.10. Do you refer to the judgment of the gods, i.e., between Poseidon and Athena for the possession of Attica . which Cecrops delivered in his court because of his virtue? Yes, and the care and birth of Erectheus, Iliad, II. 547. Ἐρεχθῇος μεγαλήτορος οὕ ποτ᾽ Ἀθήνη θρέψε Διὸς θυγάτηρ, τέκε δὲ ζείδωρος Ἄρουρα. and the war waged in his day with all the adjacent country, and the war between the sons of Heracles The Athenians claimed that it was through their assistance that the sons of Heracles gained the victory (Herodotus, ix. 27). and the Peloponnesians, and all the wars waged in the days of Theseus, Against the Amazons and Thracians. in all of which it is manifest that they were champions among the men of their time.
9. Xenophon, Symposium, 8.40 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

8.40. You may regard it as certain, therefore, that our city would be quick to entrust itself to your hands, if you so desire. For you possess the highest qualifications for such a trust: you are of aristocratic birth, of Erechtheus’ line, Callias’s family belonged to the priestly clan of the Ceryces, who traced their lineage back to Ceryx, son of Hermes and Aglaurus. The latter, however, was not a descendant of Erechtheus, but one of his nurses. a priest serving the gods who under the leadership of Iacchus took the field against the barbarian; Herodotus (VIII, 65) and Plutarch ( Life of Themistocles, XV) report the tradition that while the Greek fleet was at anchor near Salamis just before the critical sea-fight, great elation was caused at sight of a big cloud of dust (or, in the later version, a brilliant light) off toward Eleusis , and a wonderful sound as of the Eleusinian festival with its cries to Iacchus, followed by a cloud that drifted directly toward the fleet. and in our day you outshine your predecessors in the splendour of your priestly office in the festival; In addition to being one of the priestly Ceryces, Callias was an hereditary torch-bearer in the Eleusinian festival. and you possess a person more goodly to the eye than any other in the city and one at the same time able to withstand effort and hardship.
10. Aristotle, Athenian Constitution, 21.6 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

11. Demosthenes, Orations, 20.70, 60.26, 60.28-60.31 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

12. Philochorus, Fragments, 105 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

13. Strabo, Geography, 9.1.16 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

9.1.16. The city itself is a rock situated in a plain and surrounded by dwellings. On the rock is the sacred precinct of Athena, comprising both the old temple of Athena Polias, in which is the lamp that is never quenched, and the Parthenon built by Ictinus, in which is the work in ivory by Pheidias, the Athena. However, if I once began to describe the multitude of things in this city that are lauded and proclaimed far and wide, I fear that I should go too far, and that my work would depart from the purpose I have in view. For the words of Hegesias occur to me: I see the Acropolis, and the mark of the huge trident there. I see Eleusis, and I have become an initiate into its sacred mysteries; yonder is the Leocorium, here is the Theseium; I am unable to point them all out one by one; for Attica is the possession of the gods, who seized it as a sanctuary for themselves, and of the ancestral heroes. So this writer mentioned only one of the significant things on the Acropolis; but Polemon the Periegete wrote four books on the dedicatory offerings on the Acropolis alone. Hegesias is proportionately brief in referring to the other parts of the city and to the country; and though he mentions Eleusis, one of the one hundred and seventy demes (or one hundred and seventy-four, as the number is given), he names none of the others.
14. Apollodorus, Bibliotheca, 3.14.1, 3.15.4 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

3.14.1. Κέκροψ αὐτόχθων, συμφυὲς ἔχων σῶμα ἀνδρὸς καὶ δράκοντος, τῆς Ἀττικῆς ἐβασίλευσε πρῶτος, καὶ τὴν γῆν πρότερον λεγομένην Ἀκτὴν ἀφʼ ἑαυτοῦ Κεκροπίαν ὠνόμασεν. ἐπὶ τούτου, φασίν, ἔδοξε τοῖς θεοῖς πόλεις καταλαβέσθαι, ἐν αἷς ἔμελλον ἔχειν τιμὰς ἰδίας ἕκαστος. ἧκεν οὖν πρῶτος Ποσειδῶν ἐπὶ τὴν Ἀττικήν, καὶ πλήξας τῇ τριαίνῃ κατὰ μέσην τὴν ἀκρόπολιν ἀπέφηνε θάλασσαν, ἣν νῦν Ἐρεχθηίδα καλοῦσι. μετὰ δὲ τοῦτον ἧκεν Ἀθηνᾶ, καὶ ποιησαμένη τῆς καταλήψεως Κέκροπα μάρτυρα ἐφύτευσεν ἐλαίαν, ἣ νῦν ἐν τῷ Πανδροσείῳ 1 -- δείκνυται. γενομένης δὲ ἔριδος ἀμφοῖν περὶ τῆς χώρας, διαλύσας Ζεὺς κριτὰς ἔδωκεν, 1 -- οὐχ ὡς εἶπόν τινες, Κέκροπα καὶ Κραναόν, 2 -- οὐδὲ Ἐρυσίχθονα, θεοὺς δὲ τοὺς δώδεκα. καὶ τούτων δικαζόντων ἡ χώρα τῆς Ἀθηνᾶς ἐκρίθη, Κέκροπος μαρτυρήσαντος ὅτι πρώτη 3 -- τὴν ἐλαίαν ἐφύτευσεν. Ἀθηνᾶ μὲν οὖν ἀφʼ ἑαυτῆς τὴν πόλιν ἐκάλεσεν Ἀθήνας, Ποσειδῶν δὲ θυμῷ ὀργισθεὶς τὸ Θριάσιον πεδίον ἐπέκλυσε καὶ τὴν Ἀττικὴν ὕφαλον ἐποίησε. 3.15.4. Χιόνη δὲ Ποσειδῶνι 4 -- μίγνυται. ἡ δὲ κρύφα τοῦ πατρὸς Εὔμολπον τεκοῦσα, ἵνα μὴ γένηται καταφανής, εἰς τὸν βυθὸν ῥίπτει τὸ παιδίον. Ποσειδῶν δὲ ἀνελόμενος εἰς Αἰθιοπίαν κομίζει καὶ δίδωσι Βενθεσικύμῃ τρέφειν, αὐτοῦ θυγατρὶ καὶ Ἀμφιτρίτης. ὡς δὲ ἐτελειώθη, 1 -- ὁ Βενθεσικύμης ἀνὴρ τὴν ἑτέραν αὐτῷ τῶν θυγατέρων δίδωσιν. ὁ δὲ καὶ τὴν ἀδελφὴν τῆς γαμηθείσης ἐπεχείρησε βιάζεσθαι, καὶ διὰ τοῦτο φυγαδευθεὶς μετὰ Ἰσμάρου τοῦ παιδὸς πρὸς Τεγύριον ἧκε, Θρᾳκῶν βασιλέα, ὃς αὐτοῦ τῷ παιδὶ τὴν θυγατέρα συνῴκισεν. 2 -- ἐπιβουλεύων δὲ ὕστερον Τεγυρίῳ καταφανὴς γίνεται, καὶ πρὸς Ἐλευσινίους φεύγει καὶ φιλίαν ποιεῖται πρὸς αὐτούς. αὖθις δὲ Ἰσμάρου τελευτήσαντος μεταπεμφθεὶς ὑπὸ Τεγυρίου παραγίνεται, καὶ τὴν πρὸ τοῦ μάχην διαλυσάμενος τὴν βασιλείαν παρέλαβε. καὶ πολέμου ἐνστάντος πρὸς Ἀθηναίους τοῖς Ἐλευσινίοις, 3 -- ἐπικληθεὶς ὑπὸ Ἐλευσινίων μετὰ πολλῆς συνεμάχει Θρᾳκῶν δυνάμεως. Ἐρεχθεῖ δὲ ὑπὲρ 1 -- Ἀθηναίων νίκης χρωμένῳ ἔχρησεν ὁ θεὸς κατορθώσειν τὸν πόλεμον, ἐὰν μίαν τῶν θυγατέρων σφάξῃ. καὶ σφάξαντος αὐτοῦ τὴν νεωτάτην καὶ αἱ λοιπαὶ ἑαυτὰς κατέσφαξαν· ἐπεποίηντο γάρ, ὡς ἔφασάν τινες, συνωμοσίαν ἀλλήλαις συναπολέσθαι. γενομένης δὲ μετὰ τὴν 2 -- σφαγὴν τῆς μάχης Ἐρεχθεὺς μὲν ἀνεῖλεν Εὔμολπον
15. Plutarch, Theseus, 19.4 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

16. Aelius Aristides, Orations, 1.87 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

17. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 1.3.2-1.3.4, 1.5.2, 1.26.2, 1.27.4, 1.28.4, 1.38.3, 9.19.1, 9.30.1, 10.21.5-10.21.6 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1.3.2. Near the portico stand Conon, Timotheus his son and Evagoras Evagoras was a king of Salamis in Cyprus, who reigned from about 410 to 374 B.C. He favoured the Athenians, and helped Conon to defeat the Spartan fleet off Cnidus in 394 B.C. King of Cyprus, who caused the Phoenician men-of-war to be given to Conon by King Artaxerxes. This he did as an Athenian whose ancestry connected him with Salamis, for he traced his pedigree back to Teucer and the daughter of Cinyras. Here stands Zeus, called Zeus of Freedom, and the Emperor Hadrian, a benefactor to all his subjects and especially to the city of the Athenians. 1.3.3. A portico is built behind with pictures of the gods called the Twelve. On the wall opposite are painted Theseus, Democracy and Demos. The picture represents Theseus as the one who gave the Athenians political equality. By other means also has the report spread among men that Theseus bestowed sovereignty upon the people, and that from his time they continued under a democratical government, until Peisistratus rose up and became despot. 560-527 B.C. But there are many false beliefs current among the mass of mankind, since they are ignorant of historical science and consider trustworthy whatever they have heard from childhood in choruses and tragedies; one of these is about Theseus, who in fact himself became king, and afterwards, when Menestheus was dead, the descendants of Theseus remained rulers even to the fourth generation. But if I cared about tracing the pedigree I should have included in the list, besides these, the kings from Melanthus to Cleidicus the son of Aesimides. 1.3.4. Here is a picture of the exploit, near Mantinea, of the Athenians who were sent to help the Lacedaemonians. 362 B.C. Xenophon among others has written a history of the whole war—the taking of the Cadmea, the defeat of the Lacedaemonians at Leuctra, how the Boeotians invaded the Peloponnesus,and the contingent sent to the Lacedacmonians from the Athenians. In the picture is a cavalry battle, in which the most famous men are, among the Athenians, Grylus the son of Xenophon, and in the Boeotian cavalry, Epaminondas the Theban. These pictures were painted for the Athenians by Euphranor, and he also wrought the Apollo surnamed Patrous (Paternal) in the temple hard by. And in front of the temple is one Apollo made by Leochares; the other Apollo, called Averter of evil, was made by Calamis. They say that the god received this name because by an oracle from Delphi he stayed the pestilence which afflicted the Athenians at the time of the Peloponnesian War. 430 B.C. 1.5.2. The eponymoi That is, “those after whom others are named.” —this is the name given to them—are Hippothoon son of Poseidon and Alope daughter of Cercyon, Antiochus, one of the children of Heracles borne to him by Meda daughter of Phylas, thirdly, Ajax son of Telamon, and to the Athenians belongs Leos, who is said to have given up his daughters, at the command of the oracle, for the safety of the commonwealth. Among the eponymoi is Erechtheus, who conquered the Eleusinians in battle, and killed their general, Immaradus the son of Eumolpus. There is Aegeus also and Oeneus the bastard son of Pandion, and Acamas, one of the children of Theseus. 1.26.2. So Athens was delivered from the Macedonians, and though all the Athenians fought memorably, Leocritus the son of Protarchus is said to have displayed most daring in the engagement. For he was the first to scale the fortification, and the first to rush into the Museum; and when he fell fighting, the Athenians did him great honor, dedicating his shield to Zeus of Freedom and in scribing on it the name of Leocritus and his exploit. 1.27.4. By the temple of Athena is .... an old woman about a cubit high, the inscription calling her a handmaid of Lysimache, and large bronze figures of men facing each other for a fight, one of whom they call Erechtheus, the other Eumolpus; and yet those Athenians who are acquainted with antiquity must surely know that this victim of Erechtheus was Immaradus, the son of Eumolpus. 1.28.4. On descending, not to the lower city, but to just beneath the Gateway, you see a fountain and near it a sanctuary of Apollo in a cave. It is here that Apollo is believed to have met Creusa, daughter of Erechtheus.... when the Persians had landed in Attica Philippides was sent to carry the tidings to Lacedaemon . On his return he said that the Lacedacmonians had postponed their departure, because it was their custom not to go out to fight before the moon was full. Philippides went on to say that near Mount Parthenius he had been met by Pan, who told him that he was friendly to the Athenians and would come to Marathon to fight for them. This deity, then, has been honored for this announcement. 1.38.3. When the Eleusinians fought with the Athenians, Erechtheus, king of the Athenians, was killed, as was also Immaradus, son of Eumolpus. These were the terms on which they concluded the war: the Eleusinians were to have in dependent control of the mysteries, but in all things else were to be subject to the Athenians. The ministers of the Two Goddesses were Eumolpus and the daughters of Celeus, whom Pamphos and Homer agree in naming Diogenia, Pammerope, and the third Saesara. Eumolpus was survived by Ceryx, the younger of his sons whom the Ceryces themselves say was a son of Aglaurus, daughter of Cecrops, and of Hermes, not of Eumolpus. 9.19.1. On this highway is a place called Teumessus, where it is said that Europa was hidden by Zeus. There is also another legend, which tells of a fox called the Teumessian fox, how owing to the wrath of Dionysus the beast was reared to destroy the Thebans, and how, when about to be caught by the hound given by Artemis to Procris the daughter of Erechtheus, the fox was turned into a stone, as was likewise this hound. In Teumessus there is also a sanctuary of Telchinian Athena, which contains no image. As to her surname, we may hazard the conjecture that a division of the Telchinians who once dwelt in Cyprus came to Boeotia and established a sanctuary of Telchinian Athena. 9.30.1. The first images of the Muses are of them all, from the hand of Cephisodotus, while a little farther on are three, also from the hand of Cephisodotus, and three more by Strongylion, an excellent artist of oxen and horses. The remaining three were made by Olympiosthenes. There is also on Helicon a bronze Apollo fighting with Hermes for the lyre. There is also a Dionysus by Lysippus; the standing image, however, of Dionysus, that Sulla dedicated, is the most noteworthy of the works of Myron after the Erectheus at Athens . What he dedicated was not his own; he took it away from the Minyae of Orchomenus . This is an illustration of the Greek proverb, “to worship the gods with other people's incense.” 10.21.5. On this day the Attic contingent surpassed the other Greeks in courage. of the Athenians themselves the bravest was Cydias, a young man who had never before been in battle. He was killed by the Gauls, but his relatives dedicated his shield to Zeus God of Freedom, and the inscription ran:— Here hang I, yearning for the still youthful bloom of Cydias, The shield of a glorious man, an offering to Zeus. I was the very first through which at this battle he thrust his left arm, When the battle raged furiously against the Gaul . 10.21.6. This inscription remained until Sulla and his army took away, among other Athenian treasures, the shields in the porch of Zeus, God of Freedom. After this battle at Thermopylae the Greeks buried their own dead and spoiled the barbarians, but the Gauls sent no herald to ask leave to take up the bodies, and were indifferent whether the earth received them or whether they were devoured by wild beasts or carrion birds.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aglauros Henderson, The Springtime of the People: The Athenian Ephebeia and Citizen Training from Lykourgos to Augustus (2020) 143, 148
agora xi–xiii Henderson, The Springtime of the People: The Athenian Ephebeia and Citizen Training from Lykourgos to Augustus (2020) 143
akropolis, statue group by myron Shear, Serving Athena: The Festival of the Panathenaia and the Construction of Athenian Identities (2021) 69
akropolis Henderson, The Springtime of the People: The Athenian Ephebeia and Citizen Training from Lykourgos to Augustus (2020) 148
alkon, child of erechtheus Shear, Serving Athena: The Festival of the Panathenaia and the Construction of Athenian Identities (2021) 69
apollo Henderson, The Springtime of the People: The Athenian Ephebeia and Citizen Training from Lykourgos to Augustus (2020) 148
aristotle Amendola, The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary (2022) 92
athenian ancestors Barbato, The Ideology of Democratic Athens: Institutions, Orators and the Mythical Past (2020) 62
athenian tribes Amendola, The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary (2022) 92
autochthony, and athenians Shear, Serving Athena: The Festival of the Panathenaia and the Construction of Athenian Identities (2021) 69
basileia (βαϲιλεία) vii Amendola, The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary (2022) 92
chthonia, child of erechtheus Shear, Serving Athena: The Festival of the Panathenaia and the Construction of Athenian Identities (2021) 69
delium Edmunds, Greek Myth (2021) 28
delphi Henderson, The Springtime of the People: The Athenian Ephebeia and Citizen Training from Lykourgos to Augustus (2020) 148
delphic oracle Amendola, The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary (2022) 92
democracy vii Amendola, The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary (2022) 92
demokratia Henderson, The Springtime of the People: The Athenian Ephebeia and Citizen Training from Lykourgos to Augustus (2020) 143
demos Henderson, The Springtime of the People: The Athenian Ephebeia and Citizen Training from Lykourgos to Augustus (2020) 143
eirene Henderson, The Springtime of the People: The Athenian Ephebeia and Citizen Training from Lykourgos to Augustus (2020) 143
eleusinians Edmunds, Greek Myth (2021) 28
elite, ideological agency Barbato, The Ideology of Democratic Athens: Institutions, Orators and the Mythical Past (2020) 62
eponymous hero, fights eleusinians Shear, Serving Athena: The Festival of the Panathenaia and the Construction of Athenian Identities (2021) 69
eponymous hero, king Shear, Serving Athena: The Festival of the Panathenaia and the Construction of Athenian Identities (2021) 69
eponymous hero, sacrifices daughters' Shear, Serving Athena: The Festival of the Panathenaia and the Construction of Athenian Identities (2021) 69
eponymous hero Shear, Serving Athena: The Festival of the Panathenaia and the Construction of Athenian Identities (2021) 69
eponymous heroes Amendola, The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary (2022) 92; Henderson, The Springtime of the People: The Athenian Ephebeia and Citizen Training from Lykourgos to Augustus (2020) 143
equality Barbato, The Ideology of Democratic Athens: Institutions, Orators and the Mythical Past (2020) 62
erechtheidae Edmunds, Greek Myth (2021) 28
erechtheis, tribe Shear, Serving Athena: The Festival of the Panathenaia and the Construction of Athenian Identities (2021) 69
erechtheus, as father Shear, Serving Athena: The Festival of the Panathenaia and the Construction of Athenian Identities (2021) 69
erechtheus, death Shear, Serving Athena: The Festival of the Panathenaia and the Construction of Athenian Identities (2021) 69
erechtheus Edmunds, Greek Myth (2021) 28
erekhtheus Henderson, The Springtime of the People: The Athenian Ephebeia and Citizen Training from Lykourgos to Augustus (2020) 143, 148
erichthonios, and erechtheus Shear, Serving Athena: The Festival of the Panathenaia and the Construction of Athenian Identities (2021) 69
erichthonios, birth Shear, Serving Athena: The Festival of the Panathenaia and the Construction of Athenian Identities (2021) 69
euagoras (king of salamis) Henderson, The Springtime of the People: The Athenian Ephebeia and Citizen Training from Lykourgos to Augustus (2020) 143
eumolpos Henderson, The Springtime of the People: The Athenian Ephebeia and Citizen Training from Lykourgos to Augustus (2020) 148; Shear, Serving Athena: The Festival of the Panathenaia and the Construction of Athenian Identities (2021) 69
eumolpus Edmunds, Greek Myth (2021) 28
face-to-face society Barbato, The Ideology of Democratic Athens: Institutions, Orators and the Mythical Past (2020) 8
freedom Barbato, The Ideology of Democratic Athens: Institutions, Orators and the Mythical Past (2020) 62
funeral oration, catalogue of exploits Barbato, The Ideology of Democratic Athens: Institutions, Orators and the Mythical Past (2020) 62
funeral oration, depiction of democracy Barbato, The Ideology of Democratic Athens: Institutions, Orators and the Mythical Past (2020) 62
funeral oration, influence on athenians Barbato, The Ideology of Democratic Athens: Institutions, Orators and the Mythical Past (2020) 41
funeral oration, myths in Barbato, The Ideology of Democratic Athens: Institutions, Orators and the Mythical Past (2020) 41
hellenistic ideology of kingship Amendola, The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary (2022) 92
herakles Henderson, The Springtime of the People: The Athenian Ephebeia and Citizen Training from Lykourgos to Augustus (2020) 148
hestia Henderson, The Springtime of the People: The Athenian Ephebeia and Citizen Training from Lykourgos to Augustus (2020) 148
ideology, constructive function Barbato, The Ideology of Democratic Athens: Institutions, Orators and the Mythical Past (2020) 8, 62
ideology, culturalist view of Barbato, The Ideology of Democratic Athens: Institutions, Orators and the Mythical Past (2020) 8
ideology, descriptive aspect Barbato, The Ideology of Democratic Athens: Institutions, Orators and the Mythical Past (2020) 8
imagined community Barbato, The Ideology of Democratic Athens: Institutions, Orators and the Mythical Past (2020) 8
immarados Shear, Serving Athena: The Festival of the Panathenaia and the Construction of Athenian Identities (2021) 69
kekrops Henderson, The Springtime of the People: The Athenian Ephebeia and Citizen Training from Lykourgos to Augustus (2020) 148
kekrops (ii), child of erechtheus Shear, Serving Athena: The Festival of the Panathenaia and the Construction of Athenian Identities (2021) 69
khaironeia, battle of xiii Henderson, The Springtime of the People: The Athenian Ephebeia and Citizen Training from Lykourgos to Augustus (2020) 143
knidos Henderson, The Springtime of the People: The Athenian Ephebeia and Citizen Training from Lykourgos to Augustus (2020) 143
konon Henderson, The Springtime of the People: The Athenian Ephebeia and Citizen Training from Lykourgos to Augustus (2020) 143
kosmetes Henderson, The Springtime of the People: The Athenian Ephebeia and Citizen Training from Lykourgos to Augustus (2020) 143
kourotrophos Henderson, The Springtime of the People: The Athenian Ephebeia and Citizen Training from Lykourgos to Augustus (2020) 148
kreousa, child of erechtheus Shear, Serving Athena: The Festival of the Panathenaia and the Construction of Athenian Identities (2021) 69
leosthenes Barbato, The Ideology of Democratic Athens: Institutions, Orators and the Mythical Past (2020) 62
lokhagos Henderson, The Springtime of the People: The Athenian Ephebeia and Citizen Training from Lykourgos to Augustus (2020) 143
loraux, n., on ideology Barbato, The Ideology of Democratic Athens: Institutions, Orators and the Mythical Past (2020) 8
marathon (battle of) Barbato, The Ideology of Democratic Athens: Institutions, Orators and the Mythical Past (2020) 62
merope, child of erechtheus Shear, Serving Athena: The Festival of the Panathenaia and the Construction of Athenian Identities (2021) 69
metion, child of erechtheus Shear, Serving Athena: The Festival of the Panathenaia and the Construction of Athenian Identities (2021) 69
murray, oswyn Amendola, The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary (2022) 92
myth, athenians knowledge of Barbato, The Ideology of Democratic Athens: Institutions, Orators and the Mythical Past (2020) 41
oath Henderson, The Springtime of the People: The Athenian Ephebeia and Citizen Training from Lykourgos to Augustus (2020) 148
ober, j., on ideology Barbato, The Ideology of Democratic Athens: Institutions, Orators and the Mythical Past (2020) 8
orator, role in ideological practice Barbato, The Ideology of Democratic Athens: Institutions, Orators and the Mythical Past (2020) 62
oreithyia, child of erechtheus Shear, Serving Athena: The Festival of the Panathenaia and the Construction of Athenian Identities (2021) 69
orneus, child of erechtheus Shear, Serving Athena: The Festival of the Panathenaia and the Construction of Athenian Identities (2021) 69
pandora, child of erechtheus Shear, Serving Athena: The Festival of the Panathenaia and the Construction of Athenian Identities (2021) 69
pandrosos Henderson, The Springtime of the People: The Athenian Ephebeia and Citizen Training from Lykourgos to Augustus (2020) 148
pericles, son of Edmunds, Greek Myth (2021) 28
poseidon Shear, Serving Athena: The Festival of the Panathenaia and the Construction of Athenian Identities (2021) 69
prokris, child of erechtheus Shear, Serving Athena: The Festival of the Panathenaia and the Construction of Athenian Identities (2021) 69
protogeneia, child of erechtheus Shear, Serving Athena: The Festival of the Panathenaia and the Construction of Athenian Identities (2021) 69
prytaneion Henderson, The Springtime of the People: The Athenian Ephebeia and Citizen Training from Lykourgos to Augustus (2020) 148
ptolemaic royal ideology vi Amendola, The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary (2022) 92
ptolemy i soter Amendola, The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary (2022) 92
ptolemy ii philadelphus Amendola, The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary (2022) 92
ptolemy iii euergetes Amendola, The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary (2022) 92
registration, ephebe Henderson, The Springtime of the People: The Athenian Ephebeia and Citizen Training from Lykourgos to Augustus (2020) 148
sikyon, child of erechtheus Shear, Serving Athena: The Festival of the Panathenaia and the Construction of Athenian Identities (2021) 69
socrates Edmunds, Greek Myth (2021) 28
sophronistes Henderson, The Springtime of the People: The Athenian Ephebeia and Citizen Training from Lykourgos to Augustus (2020) 143
state funeral for the war dead, discursive parameters Barbato, The Ideology of Democratic Athens: Institutions, Orators and the Mythical Past (2020) 62
stoa of zeus eleutherios Henderson, The Springtime of the People: The Athenian Ephebeia and Citizen Training from Lykourgos to Augustus (2020) 143
thespios, child of erechtheus Shear, Serving Athena: The Festival of the Panathenaia and the Construction of Athenian Identities (2021) 69
timotheos (general) Henderson, The Springtime of the People: The Athenian Ephebeia and Citizen Training from Lykourgos to Augustus (2020) 143
tour of sanctuaries Henderson, The Springtime of the People: The Athenian Ephebeia and Citizen Training from Lykourgos to Augustus (2020) 143
virtues, eutaxia (discipline, good order) Henderson, The Springtime of the People: The Athenian Ephebeia and Citizen Training from Lykourgos to Augustus (2020) 143
virtues, peitharkhia (obedience) Henderson, The Springtime of the People: The Athenian Ephebeia and Citizen Training from Lykourgos to Augustus (2020) 143
virtues, sophrosyne (self-mastery, self-control, moderation, modesty) Henderson, The Springtime of the People: The Athenian Ephebeia and Citizen Training from Lykourgos to Augustus (2020) 143
zeus eleutherios Henderson, The Springtime of the People: The Athenian Ephebeia and Citizen Training from Lykourgos to Augustus (2020) 143