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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



4413
Demosthenes, Orations, 24.8-24.9


nanbut the man who had wickedly brought me to that pass I accounted an enemy with whom I could make no terms. When I discovered that he had defrauded the whole commonwealth in the collection of the property-tax and in the manufacture of processional utensils, and that he held and refused to restore a great deal of money belonging to the Goddess, the Heroes, and the State, I proceeded against him with the aid of Euctemon, thinking it a favorable opportunity for doing the State a service, and at the same time getting satisfaction for the wrongs I had suffered. My purpose would naturally be that I should accomplish my desire, and that he should get his deserts.


nanThe facts were indisputable; the Council condemned him; the Assembly spent a whole day over the case; two juries, each a thousand-and-one strong, brought in their verdict; and then, when there was no subterfuge left by which you could be kept out of your money, this man Timocrates, with the most insolent contempt of the whole proceeding, proposes this law,—a law by which he robs the gods of their consecrated treasure and the city of her just dues, invalidates the judgements pronounced by the Council, the Assembly, and the Courts of Justice, and has given free licence to everybody to plunder the treasury.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

7 results
1. Herodotus, Histories, 6.75, 8.55 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

6.75. When the Lacedaemonians learned that Cleomenes was doing this, they took fright and brought him back to Sparta to rule on the same terms as before. Cleomenes had already been not entirely in his right mind, and on his return from exile a mad sickness fell upon him: any Spartan that he happened to meet he would hit in the face with his staff. ,For doing this, and because he was out of his mind, his relatives bound him in the stocks. When he was in the stocks and saw that his guard was left alone, he demanded a dagger; the guard at first refused to give it, but Cleomenes threatened what he would do to him when he was freed, until the guard, who was a helot, was frightened by the threats and gave him the dagger. ,Cleomenes took the weapon and set about slashing himself from his shins upwards; from the shin to the thigh he cut his flesh lengthways, then from the thigh to the hip and the sides, until he reached the belly, and cut it into strips; thus he died, as most of the Greeks say, because he persuaded the Pythian priestess to tell the tale of Demaratus. The Athenians alone say it was because he invaded Eleusis and laid waste the precinct of the gods. The Argives say it was because when Argives had taken refuge after the battle in their temple of Argus he brought them out and cut them down, then paid no heed to the sacred grove and set it on fire. 8.55. I will tell why I have mentioned this. In that acropolis is a shrine of Erechtheus, called the “Earthborn,” and in the shrine are an olive tree and a pool of salt water. The story among the Athenians is that they were set there by Poseidon and Athena as tokens when they contended for the land. It happened that the olive tree was burnt by the barbarians with the rest of the sacred precinct, but on the day after its burning, when the Athenians ordered by the king to sacrifice went up to the sacred precinct, they saw a shoot of about a cubit's length sprung from the stump, and they reported this.
2. Lysias, Orations, 6.54, 12.35, 15.9, 27.7, 30.23 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

3. Aeschines, Letters, 1.90-1.91, 1.176-1.177, 1.192-1.193 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

4. Aristotle, Athenian Constitution, 47.4 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

5. Demosthenes, Orations, 21.98, 21.220-21.222, 21.224-21.225, 21.227, 22.1-22.2, 22.5, 22.8, 22.13, 22.22, 22.36-22.37, 22.48, 22.68-22.78, 24.6, 24.101, 24.120-24.121, 25.53, 43.58, 43.71, 53.1, 56.48, 58.14, 59.1, 59.15, 59.126 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

6. Epigraphy, Lscg, 118

7. Epigraphy, Seg, 24.151



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aigeus Papazarkadas, Sacred and Public Land in Ancient Athens (2011) 101
argument, strategies of Gagarin and Cohen, The Cambridge Companion to Ancient Greek Law (2005) 138
artemis, ephesia Papazarkadas, Sacred and Public Land in Ancient Athens (2011) 8
athena, goddess of the treasury Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 133
boule, crown for Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 128
bouleuterion (old), dedication to the eponymous heroes Papazarkadas, Sacred and Public Land in Ancient Athens (2011) 101
crown, dedicated Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 128
dating Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 128
dekeleieis Papazarkadas, Sacred and Public Land in Ancient Athens (2011) 8
epistatai, shrine Papazarkadas, Sacred and Public Land in Ancient Athens (2011) 8
eponymous heroes (tribal), collective cult Papazarkadas, Sacred and Public Land in Ancient Athens (2011) 101
euthydemos, supervisor of property of antiochis Papazarkadas, Sacred and Public Land in Ancient Athens (2011) 101
festivals, prizes for victorious competitors Papazarkadas, Sacred and Public Land in Ancient Athens (2011) 101
finances, sacred Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 133
gods, intervention Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 133
graphe, asebias Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 128
houses, sacred Papazarkadas, Sacred and Public Land in Ancient Athens (2011) 8
invective, standard part of speech Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 128
law, athenian. Gagarin and Cohen, The Cambridge Companion to Ancient Greek Law (2005) 138
law Papazarkadas, Sacred and Public Land in Ancient Athens (2011) 101
lemnos, temenos at Papazarkadas, Sacred and Public Land in Ancient Athens (2011) 101
mylasa Papazarkadas, Sacred and Public Land in Ancient Athens (2011) 8
orgeones, cults of Papazarkadas, Sacred and Public Land in Ancient Athens (2011) 101
panathenaia (great) Papazarkadas, Sacred and Public Land in Ancient Athens (2011) 101
parents, parricide Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 128
procedural law Gagarin and Cohen, The Cambridge Companion to Ancient Greek Law (2005) 138
public, landed property Papazarkadas, Sacred and Public Land in Ancient Athens (2011) 8
public, modern notions about Papazarkadas, Sacred and Public Land in Ancient Athens (2011) 8
public and private litigation. Gagarin and Cohen, The Cambridge Companion to Ancient Greek Law (2005) 138
rhetoric Gagarin and Cohen, The Cambridge Companion to Ancient Greek Law (2005) 138
scholia Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 133
self-portrayal Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 128
supporting speakers Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 128
teithras Papazarkadas, Sacred and Public Land in Ancient Athens (2011) 101
temenos (τέμενος) Papazarkadas, Sacred and Public Land in Ancient Athens (2011) 8
temple, temple-robbery' Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 133
tribes (cleisthenic), aigeis Papazarkadas, Sacred and Public Land in Ancient Athens (2011) 101
tribes (cleisthenic), antiochis Papazarkadas, Sacred and Public Land in Ancient Athens (2011) 101
tribes (cleisthenic), oineis Papazarkadas, Sacred and Public Land in Ancient Athens (2011) 101
xenophon, consecrates estate to artemis ephesia Papazarkadas, Sacred and Public Land in Ancient Athens (2011) 8