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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



4413
Demosthenes, Orations, 24.129-24.130


nanand yet, when you had honored him with the office of ambassador, robbed the Goddess at Athens of her tithe of the plunder he took from your enemies? Was it not he who, being appointed treasurer at the Acropolis, stole from that place those prizes of victory which our ancestors carried off from the barbarians, the throne with silver feet, and Mardonius’s scimitar, which weighed three hundred darics? These exploits, however, are so celebrated that they are known to everybody. But in everything else is he not a man of violence? Aye, he has no equal for that.


nanIs it right, then, that you should deal tenderly with any one of them, and disregard for their sakes the tithes of Athena or the double repayment of public moneys? Is it right to leave unpunished the man who is exerting himself to save them? What is there, gentlemen, to prevent everybody turning knave, if knavery is to be profitable? Nothing that I can see.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

8 results
1. Herodotus, Histories, 9.85 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

9.85. But the Greeks, when they had divided the spoils at Plataea, buried each contingent of their dead in a separate place. The Lacedaemonians made three tombs; there they buried their “irens,” among whom were Posidonius, Amompharetus, Philocyon, and Callicrates. ,In one of the tombs, then, were the “irens,” in the second the rest of the Spartans, and in the third the helots. This, then is how the Lacedaemonians buried their dead. The Tegeans, however, buried all theirs together in a place apart, and the Athenians did similarly with their own dead. So too did the Megarians and Phliasians with those who had been killed by the horsemen. ,All the tombs of these peoples were filled with dead; but as for the rest of the states whose tombs are to be seen at Plataeae, their tombs are but empty barrows that they built for the sake of men that should come after, because they were ashamed to have been absent from the battle. There is one there called the tomb of the Aeginetans, which, as I learn by inquiry, was built as late as ten years after, at the Aeginetans' desire, by their patron and protector Cleades son of Autodicus, a Plataean.
2. Isocrates, Orations, 4.145 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

3. Lysias, Orations, 2.27 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

4. Aeschines, Letters, 3.132 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

5. Demosthenes, Orations, 22.77-22.78, 24.111-24.113, 24.115, 24.120-24.122, 24.124, 24.130-24.131, 24.137, 24.148-24.152, 24.154 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

6. Plutarch, Aristides, 11.3-11.8, 19.5 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

7. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 1.27.1 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1.27.1. In the temple of Athena Polias (of the City) is a wooden Hermes, said to have been dedicated by Cecrops, but not visible because of myrtle boughs. The votive offerings worth noting are, of the old ones, a folding chair made by Daedalus, Persian spoils, namely the breastplate of Masistius, who commanded the cavalry at Plataea 479 B.C., and a scimitar said to have belonged to Mardonius. Now Masistius I know was killed by the Athenian cavalry. But Mardonius was opposed by the Lacedaemonians and was killed by a Spartan; so the Athenians could not have taken the scimitar to begin with, and furthermore the Lacedaemonians would scarcely have suffered them to carry it off.
8. Aeschines, Or., 3.132



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aeginetans Mikalson, Herodotus and Religion in the Persian Wars (2003) 104
ancestors, athenian Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 131
artaxerxes ii Marincola et al., Lloyd Llewellyn-Jones and Calum Maciver, Greek Notions of the Past in the Archaic and Classical Eras: History Without Historians (2021) 324
artaxerxes iii Marincola et al., Lloyd Llewellyn-Jones and Calum Maciver, Greek Notions of the Past in the Archaic and Classical Eras: History Without Historians (2021) 324
asebia (impiety), of androtion Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 131
athenians, dedications of Mikalson, Herodotus and Religion in the Persian Wars (2003) 104
athenians, sacrifices of Mikalson, Herodotus and Religion in the Persian Wars (2003) 104
athenians, treatment of dead Mikalson, Herodotus and Religion in the Persian Wars (2003) 104
athenians, vows of Mikalson, Herodotus and Religion in the Persian Wars (2003) 104
authenticity Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 131
cleades of plataea Mikalson, Herodotus and Religion in the Persian Wars (2003) 104
darius iii Marincola et al., Lloyd Llewellyn-Jones and Calum Maciver, Greek Notions of the Past in the Archaic and Classical Eras: History Without Historians (2021) 324
dead, treatment of Mikalson, Herodotus and Religion in the Persian Wars (2003) 104
dedications, after plataea Mikalson, Herodotus and Religion in the Persian Wars (2003) 104
delphic oracle, to aristides Mikalson, Herodotus and Religion in the Persian Wars (2003) 104
isocrates Marincola et al., Lloyd Llewellyn-Jones and Calum Maciver, Greek Notions of the Past in the Archaic and Classical Eras: History Without Historians (2021) 324
marathon, battle of Marincola et al., Lloyd Llewellyn-Jones and Calum Maciver, Greek Notions of the Past in the Archaic and Classical Eras: History Without Historians (2021) 324
masistius of persia Mikalson, Herodotus and Religion in the Persian Wars (2003) 104
megarians Mikalson, Herodotus and Religion in the Persian Wars (2003) 104
miaros (pollution, impurity), disqualifying from public life Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 131
oaths, of plataea Mikalson, Herodotus and Religion in the Persian Wars (2003) 104
persia Marincola et al., Lloyd Llewellyn-Jones and Calum Maciver, Greek Notions of the Past in the Archaic and Classical Eras: History Without Historians (2021) 324
persians Marincola et al., Lloyd Llewellyn-Jones and Calum Maciver, Greek Notions of the Past in the Archaic and Classical Eras: History Without Historians (2021) 324
prayers Mikalson, Herodotus and Religion in the Persian Wars (2003) 104
sacrifices Mikalson, Herodotus and Religion in the Persian Wars (2003) 104
spartans, treatment of dead Mikalson, Herodotus and Religion in the Persian Wars (2003) 104
spartans Mikalson, Herodotus and Religion in the Persian Wars (2003) 104
sphragitid nymphs of plataea Mikalson, Herodotus and Religion in the Persian Wars (2003) 104
tegeans Mikalson, Herodotus and Religion in the Persian Wars (2003) 104
temple, temple-robbery' Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 131
vows Mikalson, Herodotus and Religion in the Persian Wars (2003) 104
xenophantos, painter Marincola et al., Lloyd Llewellyn-Jones and Calum Maciver, Greek Notions of the Past in the Archaic and Classical Eras: History Without Historians (2021) 324
xerxes Marincola et al., Lloyd Llewellyn-Jones and Calum Maciver, Greek Notions of the Past in the Archaic and Classical Eras: History Without Historians (2021) 324