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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



4413
Demosthenes, Orations, 24.124


nanAnd then in private they talk insultingly about you, as though they were superior persons, though they are really behaving like ill-conditioned, ungrateful servants. Servants who have been manumitted, you know, gentlemen of the jury, are never grateful to their masters for their liberation, but hate them more bitterly than they hate anyone else, as sharing in the secret of their former servitude. In the same spirit politicians are not satisfied with having risen from poverty to affluence at the expense of the City, but calumniate the common people,—because the common people know what their style of life was when they were young and poor.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

4 results
1. Aristophanes, The Women Celebrating The Thesmophoria, 296-372, 295 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

295. εὐφημία 'στω, εὐφημία 'στω. εὔχεσθε τοῖν
2. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 3.37.4 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

3.37.4. The latter are always wanting to appear wiser than the laws, and to overrule every proposition brought forward, thinking that they cannot show their wit in more important matters, and by such behavior too often ruin their country; while those who mistrust their own cleverness are content to be less learned than the laws, and less able to pick holes in the speech of a good speaker; and being fair judges rather than rival athletes, generally conduct affairs successfully.
3. Demosthenes, Orations, 19.184-19.185, 22.77-22.78, 24.111-24.113, 24.115, 24.120-24.122, 24.129-24.131, 24.137, 24.148-24.152, 24.154 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

4. Dinarchus, Or., 1.47 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
ancestors, athenian Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 131
asebia (impiety), of androtion Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 131
athens, and identity Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 64
authenticity Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 131
curse against deceiving the demos Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 64
deception, and democratic constitution Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 165
deception, and tragedy Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 64
democracy, athenian, and noble lies Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 165
democracy, athenian, mass-elite relations in Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 165
democracy, athenian, obers view of Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 165
demosthenes, representation of deceit Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 165
demosthenes, works, on the false embassy Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 165
demosthenes Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 64, 165
dinarchus Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 165
ephebic deception in tragedy Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 64
euripides, andromache Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 64
euripides, contemporary resonances Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 64
euripides, on spartans Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 64
miaros (pollution, impurity), disqualifying from public life Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 131
noble lie Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 165
ober, j. Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 165
temple, temple-robbery' Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 131
topoi, and interplay with creative strategy Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 165
topoi Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 165
tragedy, and deception Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 64
vidal-naquet, p. Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 64