Home About Network of subjects Linked subjects heatmap Book indices included Search by subject Search by reference Browse subjects Browse texts

Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



4413
Demosthenes, Orations, 24.121-24.122


nanAs Heaven is my witness, gentlemen of the jury, I believe Androtion became the victim of this arrogant, overbearing temper, not by accident, but by the visitation of the gods, to the end that, as the mutilators of the statue of Victory perished by their own hands, Nothing is known of this incident. so these men should perish by litigation among themselves, and should either make tenfold restitution, as the laws direct, or be cast into prison.


nanI should like to make an observation about his law which occurred to my mind while I was speaking about these matters,—something quite out of the common, indeed surprisingly so. The defendant, gentlemen of the jury, has proposed that the penalty inflicted upon farmers of taxes, if they did not pay their dues, should be in accordance with the earlier statutes, in which the penalty provided is imprisonment and double restitution for men who, in consequence of losses on their contract, might possibly do the State a wrong unintentionally. On the other hand, he abolishes imprisonment for men who steal the property of the State and rob the temples of the Goddess.—If you tell us, Timocrates, that the latter are guilty of a less serious offence than the former, you must admit that you are out of your senses; and if you think their offence more serious, as indeed it is, and yet release them and refuse to release the others, is it not evident that you have sold your services to these men for a bribe?


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

6 results
1. Demosthenes, Orations, 22.77-22.78, 24.8, 24.111-24.113, 24.115, 24.120, 24.122, 24.124, 24.129-24.131, 24.137, 24.148-24.152, 24.154, 58.14 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

2. Apollodorus, Bibliotheca, 2.2.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

2.2.2. καὶ γίνεται Ἀκρισίῳ μὲν ἐξ Εὐρυδίκης τῆς Λακεδαίμονος Δανάη, Προίτῳ δὲ ἐκ Σθενεβοίας Λυσίππη καὶ Ἰφινόη καὶ Ἰφιάνασσα. αὗται δὲ ὡς ἐτελειώθησαν, ἐμάνησαν, ὡς μὲν Ἡσίοδός φησιν, ὅτι τὰς Διονύσου τελετὰς οὐ κατεδέχοντο, ὡς δὲ Ἀκουσίλαος λέγει, διότι τὸ τῆς Ἥρας ξόανον ἐξηυτέλισαν. γενόμεναι δὲ ἐμμανεῖς ἐπλανῶντο ἀνὰ τὴν Ἀργείαν ἅπασαν, αὖθις δὲ τὴν Ἀρκαδίαν καὶ τὴν Πελοπόννησον 1 -- διελθοῦσαι μετʼ ἀκοσμίας ἁπάσης διὰ τῆς ἐρημίας ἐτρόχαζον. Μελάμπους δὲ ὁ Ἀμυθάονος καὶ Εἰδομένης τῆς Ἄβαντος, μάντις ὢν καὶ τὴν διὰ φαρμάκων καὶ καθαρμῶν θεραπείαν πρῶτος εὑρηκώς, ὑπισχνεῖται θεραπεύειν τὰς παρθένους, εἰ λάβοι τὸ τρίτον μέρος τῆς δυναστείας. οὐκ ἐπιτρέποντος δὲ Προίτου θεραπεύειν ἐπὶ μισθοῖς τηλικούτοις, ἔτι μᾶλλον ἐμαίνοντο αἱ παρθένοι καὶ προσέτι μετὰ τούτων αἱ λοιπαὶ γυναῖκες· καὶ γὰρ αὗται τὰς οἰκίας ἀπολιποῦσαι τοὺς ἰδίους ἀπώλλυον παῖδας καὶ εἰς τὴν ἐρημίαν ἐφοίτων. προβαινούσης δὲ ἐπὶ πλεῖστον τῆς συμφορᾶς, τοὺς αἰτηθέντας μισθοὺς ὁ Προῖτος ἐδίδου. ὁ δὲ ὑπέσχετο θεραπεύειν ὅταν ἕτερον τοσοῦτον τῆς γῆς ὁ ἀδελφὸς αὐτοῦ λάβῃ Βίας. Προῖτος δὲ εὐλαβηθεὶς μὴ βραδυνούσης τῆς θεραπείας αἰτηθείη καὶ πλεῖον, θεραπεύειν συνεχώρησεν ἐπὶ τούτοις. Μελάμπους δὲ παραλαβὼν τοὺς δυνατωτάτους τῶν νεανιῶν μετʼ ἀλαλαγμοῦ καί τινος ἐνθέου χορείας ἐκ τῶν ὀρῶν αὐτὰς εἰς Σικυῶνα συνεδίωξε. κατὰ δὲ τὸν διωγμὸν ἡ πρεσβυτάτη τῶν θυγατέρων Ἰφινόη μετήλλαξεν· ταῖς δὲ λοιπαῖς τυχούσαις καθαρμῶν σωφρονῆσαι συνέβη. καὶ ταύτας μὲν ἐξέδοτο Προῖτος Μελάμποδι καὶ Βίαντι, παῖδα δʼ ὕστερον ἐγέννησε Μεγαπένθην.
3. Pliny The Elder, Natural History, 36.32 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

4. Plutarch, Aratus, 32.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

5. Apuleius, The Golden Ass, 11.9 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

11.9. Amongst the pleasures and popular delights which wandered hither and thither, you might see the procession of the goddess triumphantly marching forward. The women, attired in white vestments and rejoicing because they wore garlands and flowers upon their heads, bedspread the road with herbs which they bare in their aprons. This marked the path this regal and devout procession would pass. Others carried mirrors on their backs to testify obeisance to the goddess who came after. Other bore combs of ivory and declared by the gesture and motions of their arms that they were ordained and ready to dress the goddess. Others dropped balm and other precious ointments as they went. Then came a great number of men as well as women with candles, torches, and other lights, doing honor to the celestial goddess. After that sounded the musical harmony of instruments. Then came a fair company of youths, appareled in white vestments, singing both meter and verse a comely song which some studious poet had made in honor of the Muses. In the meantime there arrived the blowers of trumpets, who were dedicated to the god Serapis. Before them were officers who prepared room for the goddess to pass.
6. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 3.16.7-3.16.11, 6.20.3 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

3.16.7. The place named Limnaeum (Marshy) is sacred to Artemis Orthia (Upright). The wooden image there they say is that which once Orestes and Iphigenia stole out of the Tauric land, and the Lacedaemonians say that it was brought to their land because there also Orestes was king. I think their story more probable than that of the Athenians. For what could have induced Iphigenia to leave the image behind at Brauron ? Or why did the Athenians, when they were preparing to abandon their land, fail to include this image in what they put on board their ships? 3.16.8. And yet, right down to the present day, the fame of the Tauric goddess has remained so high that the Cappadocians dwelling on the Euxine claim that the image is among them, a like claim being made by those Lydians also who have a sanctuary of Artemis Anaeitis. But the Athenians, we are asked to believe, made light of it becoming booty of the Persians. For the image at Brauron was brought to Susa, and afterwards Seleucus gave it to the Syrians of Laodicea, who still possess it. 3.16.9. I will give other evidence that the Orthia in Lacedaemon is the wooden image from the foreigners. Firstly, Astrabacus and Alopecus, sons of Irbus, son of Amphisthenes, son of Amphicles, son of Agis, when they found the image straightway became insane. Secondly, the Spartan Limnatians, the Cynosurians, and the people of Mesoa and Pitane, while sacrificing to Artemis, fell to quarreling, which led also to bloodshed; many were killed at the altar and the rest died of disease. 3.16.10. Whereat an oracle was delivered to them, that they should stain the altar with human blood. He used to be sacrificed upon whomsoever the lot fell, but Lycurgus changed the custom to a scourging of the lads, and so in this way the altar is stained with human blood. By them stands the priestess, holding the wooden image. Now it is small and light 3.16.11. but if ever the scourgers spare the lash because of a lad's beauty or high rank, then at once the priestess finds the image grow so heavy that she can hardly carry it. She lays the blame on the scourgers, and says that it is their fault that she is being weighed down. So the image ever since the sacrifices in the Tauric land keeps its fondness for human blood. They call it not only Orthia, but also Lygodesma (Willow-bound), because it was found in a thicket of willows, and the encircling willow made the image stand upright. 6.20.3. In the front part of the temple, for it is built in two parts, is an altar of Eileithyia and an entrance for the public; in the inner Part Sosipolis is worshipped, and no one may enter it except the woman who tends the god, and she must wrap her head and face in a white veil. Maidens and matrons wait in the sanctuary of Eileithyia chanting a hymn; they burn all manner of incense to the god, but it is not the custom to pour libations of wine. An oath is taken by Sosipolis on the most important occasions.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
ancestors, athenian Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 131
artemis, artemis soteria Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 178
asebia (impiety), of androtion Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 131
athena, goddess of the treasury Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 133
authenticity Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 131
ephesos, temple of artemis Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 178
finances, sacred Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 133
frontisi-ducroux, f. Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 178
gaze, of cult images Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 178
gods, intervention Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 133
lykosura Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 178
madness, caused by statues gaze Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 178
miaros (pollution, impurity), disqualifying from public life Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 131
mimesis Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 178
prosopon Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 178
protection, against viewing divine images Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 178
scholia Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 133
sight, power of, of divine images Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 178
statues, and viewers Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 178
temple, temple-robbery' Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 131
temple, temple-robbery Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 133
viewers Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 178