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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



4413
Demosthenes, Orations, 24.11


nanA decree was moved by Aristophon in the Assembly, appointing a commission of inquiry, and directing anyone, who knew of any sacred or public money in private hands, to give information to the commission. Thereupon Euctemon laid an information that Archebius and Lysitheides, who had served as naval captains, held property captured in a ship of Naucratis to the value of nine talents and thirty minas. He approached the Council, and a provisional resolution was drafted. Subsequently the Assembly met, and the people voted in favour of further inquiry.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

9 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 10.446 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

10.446. /whether or no I have spoken to you according to right. Then with an angry glance from beneath his brows, spake to him mighty Diomedes:Nay, I bid thee, Dolon, put no thought of escape in thy heart, even though thou hast brought good tidings, seeing thou hast come into our hands. For if so be we release thee now or let thee go
2. Plato, Laws, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

857b. on obtaining pardon from the State, or after payment of double the sum stolen, he shall be let out of prison. Clin. How comes it, Stranger, that we are ruling that it makes no difference to the thief whether the thing he steals be great or small, and whether the place it is stolen from be holy or unhallowed, or whatever other differences may exist in the manner of a theft; whereas the lawgiver ought to suit the punishment to the crime by inflicting dissimilar penalties in these varying cases? Ath. Well said, Clinias! You have collided with me
3. Plato, Republic, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

344a. the man who has the ability to overreach on a large scale. Consider this type of man, then, if you wish to judge how much more profitable it is to him personally to be unjust than to be just. And the easiest way of all to understand this matter will be to turn to the most consummate form of injustice which makes the man who has done the wrong most happy and those who are wronged and who would not themselves willingly do wrong most miserable. And this is tyranny, which both by stealth and by force takes away what belongs to others, both sacred and profane, both private and public, not little by little but at one swoop.
4. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 2.13.3-2.13.5 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

2.13.3. Here they had no reason to despond. Apart from other sources of income, an average revenue of six hundred talents of silver was drawn from the tribute of the allies; and there were still six thousand talents of coined silver in the Acropolis, out of nine thousand seven hundred that had once been there, from which the money had been taken for the porch of the Acropolis, the other public buildings, and for Potidaea . 2.13.4. This did not include the uncoined gold and silver in public and private offerings, the sacred vessels for the processions and games, the Median spoils, and similar resources to the amount of five hundred talents. 2.13.5. To this he added the treasures of the other temples. These were by no means inconsiderable, and might fairly be used. Nay, if they were ever absolutely driven to it, they might take even the gold ornaments of Athena herself; for the statue contained forty talents of pure gold and it was all removable. This might be used for self-preservation, and must every penny of it be restored.
5. Aeschines, Letters, 1.23 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

6. Aristotle, Athenian Constitution, 30.2 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

7. Demosthenes, Orations, 24.9, 24.14, 24.82, 24.101, 24.111-24.112, 24.120, 24.137 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

8. Aeschines, Or., 1.23

9. Epigraphy, Ml, 58



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
athenians Naiden,Ancient Suppliation (2006)" 181
athens, administration of sacred matters Dignas, Economy of the Sacred in Hellenistic and Roman Asia Minor (2002) 16
athens, inventories Dignas, Economy of the Sacred in Hellenistic and Roman Asia Minor (2002) 16
athens Naiden,Ancient Suppliation (2006)" 181
ceans Naiden,Ancient Suppliation (2006)" 181
diomedes Naiden,Ancient Suppliation (2006)" 181
dolon Naiden,Ancient Suppliation (2006)" 181
hiera, kai demosia Dignas, Economy of the Sacred in Hellenistic and Roman Asia Minor (2002) 16
hosios (and cognates), hiera kai hosia Peels, Hosios: A Semantic Study of Greek Piety (2016) 207
laws, intercommunal Naiden,Ancient Suppliation (2006)" 181
loans, sacred Dignas, Economy of the Sacred in Hellenistic and Roman Asia Minor (2002) 16
money and the use of hosios Peels, Hosios: A Semantic Study of Greek Piety (2016) 207
plataeans Naiden,Ancient Suppliation (2006)" 181
sacred, finances Dignas, Economy of the Sacred in Hellenistic and Roman Asia Minor (2002) 16
sacred and profane meaning of hosios Peels, Hosios: A Semantic Study of Greek Piety (2016) 207
summoner (kleter) Liddel, Decrees of Fourth-Century Athens (403/2-322/1 BC): Volume 2, Political and Cultural Perspectives (2020) 115
supporting speakers' Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 240
treasuries, sacred Dignas, Economy of the Sacred in Hellenistic and Roman Asia Minor (2002) 16