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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



4413
Demosthenes, Orations, 21.53


nanOracles from Dodona To the people of the Athenians the prophet of Zeus announces. Whereas ye have let pass the seasons of the sacrifice and of the sacred embassy, he bids you send nine chosen envoys, and that right soon. To Zeus of the Ship There was a temple at Dodona dedicated to Zeus under this title to commemorate a rescue from shipwreck. sacrifice three oxen and with each ox three sheep; to Dione one ox and a brazen table for the offering which the people of the Athenians have offered. The prophet of Zeus in Dodona announces. To Dionysus pay public sacrifices and mix a bowl of wine and set up dances; to Apollo the Averter sacrifice an ox and wear garlands, both free men and slaves, and observe one day of rest; to Zeus, the giver of wealth, a white bull.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

34 results
1. Hesiod, Works And Days, 241, 240 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

240. However, when to both the foreigner
2. Aeschylus, Fragments, 20 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

3. Aeschylus, Fragments, 20 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

4. Aeschylus, Fragments, 20 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

5. Antiphon, Orations, 5.82, 6.45 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

6. Aristophanes, Peace, 278, 277 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

277. ἀλλ' εἴ τις ὑμῶν ἐν Σαμοθρᾴκῃ τυγχάνει
7. Aristophanes, The Rich Man, 1159 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1159. ἀλλ' ἡγεμόνιον. ἀλλ' ὁ θεὸς ἤδη βλέπει
8. Euripides, Electra, 171 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

171. ἀγγέλλει δ' ὅτι νῦν τριταί-
9. Herodotus, Histories, 2.55-2.57, 6.76.1, 7.133, 9.94 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

2.55. That, then, I heard from the Theban priests; and what follows, the prophetesses of Dodona say: that two black doves had come flying from Thebes in Egypt, one to Libya and one to Dodona ; ,the latter settled on an oak tree, and there uttered human speech, declaring that a place of divination from Zeus must be made there; the people of Dodona understood that the message was divine, and therefore established the oracular shrine. ,The dove which came to Libya told the Libyans (they say) to make an oracle of Ammon; this also is sacred to Zeus. Such was the story told by the Dodonaean priestesses, the eldest of whom was Promeneia and the next Timarete and the youngest Nicandra; and the rest of the servants of the temple at Dodona similarly held it true. 2.56. But my own belief about it is this. If the Phoenicians did in fact carry away the sacred women and sell one in Libya and one in Hellas, then, in my opinion, the place where this woman was sold in what is now Hellas, but was formerly called Pelasgia, was Thesprotia ; ,and then, being a slave there, she established a shrine of Zeus under an oak that was growing there; for it was reasonable that, as she had been a handmaid of the temple of Zeus at Thebes , she would remember that temple in the land to which she had come. ,After this, as soon as she understood the Greek language, she taught divination; and she said that her sister had been sold in Libya by the same Phoenicians who sold her. 2.57. I expect that these women were called “doves” by the people of Dodona because they spoke a strange language, and the people thought it like the cries of birds; ,then the woman spoke what they could understand, and that is why they say that the dove uttered human speech; as long as she spoke in a foreign tongue, they thought her voice was like the voice of a bird. For how could a dove utter the speech of men? The tale that the dove was black signifies that the woman was Egyptian . ,The fashions of divination at Thebes of Egypt and at Dodona are like one another; moreover, the practice of divining from the sacrificed victim has also come from Egypt . 6.76.1. As Cleomenes was seeking divination at Delphi, the oracle responded that he would take Argos. When he came with Spartans to the river Erasinus, which is said to flow from the Stymphalian lake (this lake issues into a cleft out of sight and reappears at Argos, and from that place onwards the stream is called by the Argives Erasinus)—when Cleomenes came to this river he offered sacrifices to it. 7.133. To Athens and Sparta Xerxes sent no heralds to demand earth, and this he did for the following reason. When Darius had previously sent men with this same purpose, those who made the request were cast at the one city into the Pit and at the other into a well, and bidden to obtain their earth and water for the king from these locations. ,What calamity befell the Athenians for dealing in this way with the heralds I cannot say, save that their land and their city were laid waste. I think, however, that there was another reason for this, and not the aforesaid. 9.94. This was the oracle given to the people of Apollonia. They kept it secret and charged certain of their townsmen to carry the business through; they acted as I will now show. Coming and sitting down by Evenius at the place where he sat, they spoke of other matters, till at last they fell to commiserating his misfortune. Guiding the conversation in this way, they asked him what compensation he would choose, if the people of Apollonia should promise to requite him for what they had done. ,He, knowing nothing of the oracle, said he would choose for a gift the lands of certain named townsmen whom he thought to have the two fairest estates in Apollonia, and a house besides which he knew to be the fairest in the town; let him (he said) have possession of these, and he would lay aside his anger, and be satisfied with that by way of restitution. ,So he said this, and those who were sitting beside him said in reply: “Evenius, the people of Apollonia hereby make you that restitution for the loss of your sight, obeying the oracle given to them.” At that he was very angry, for he learned through this the whole story and saw that they had cheated him. They did, however, buy from the possessors and give him what he had chosen, and from that day he had a natural gift of divination, through which he won fame.
10. Plato, Phaedrus, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

244b. and the priestesses at Dodona when they have been mad have conferred many splendid benefits upon Greece both in private and in public affairs, but few or none when they have been in their right minds; and if we should speak of the Sibyl and all the others who by prophetic inspiration have foretold many things to many persons and thereby made them fortunate afterwards, anyone can see that we should speak a long time. And it is worth while to adduce also the fact that those men of old who invented names thought that madness was neither shameful nor disgraceful;
11. Sophocles, Women of Trachis, 170 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

170. to be the end of the labors of Heracles just as, he said, the ancient oak at Dodona had once told him through the mouths of the two Peleiades. And it is in the present time that the truth of these prophecies is coming to pass, so that they must be fulfilled.
12. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 2.47.4 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

2.47.4. Neither were the physicians at first of any service, ignorant as they were of the proper way to treat it, but they died themselves the most thickly, as they visited the sick most often; nor did any human art succeed any better. Supplications in the temples, divinations, and so forth were found equally futile, till the overwhelming nature of the disaster at last put a stop to them altogether.
13. Xenophon, The Persian Expedition, 3.2.11-3.2.12, 7.8.5 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

3.2.11. Secondly, I would remind you of the perils of our own forefathers, to show you not only that it is your right to be brave men, but that brave men are delivered, with the help of the gods, even out of most dreadful dangers. For when the Persians and their followers came with a vast array to blot Athens out of existence, the Athenians dared, unaided, to withstand them, and won the victory. In the battle of Marathon, 490 B.C. 3.2.12. And while they had vowed to Artemis that for every man they might slay of the enemy they would sacrifice a goat to the goddess, they were unable to find goats enough; According to Herodotus ( Hdt. 6.117 ) the Persian dead numbered 6,400. so they resolved to offer five hundred every year, and this sacrifice they are paying even to this day. 7.8.5. When the man replied that it was none of these things, Xenophon asked him if he was a hoplite. He said no. Was he a peltast, then? No, not that either, he said, but he had been detailed by his messmates, although he was a free man, to drive a mule. 7.8.5. And the next day, upon coming to Ophrynium, Xenophon proceeded to sacrifice, offering whole victims of swine after the custom of his fathers, and he obtained favourable omens.
14. Xenophon, Hellenica, 3.1.17, 3.3.4 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

3.1.17. but the man who commanded the garrison in Cebren, a very strong place, thinking that if he succeeded in 399 B.C. keeping the city for Pharnabazus he would receive honours at his hands, refused to admit Dercylidas. Thereupon the latter, in anger, made preparations for attack. And when the sacrifices that he offered did not prove favourable on the first day, he sacrificed again on the following day. And when these sacrifices also did not prove favourable, he tried again on the third day; and for four days he kept persistently on with his sacrificing, though greatly disturbed by the delay; for he was in haste to make himself master of all Aeolis before Pharnabazus came to the rescue. 3.3.4. After hearing such arguments from both claimants the state chose Agesilaus king. When Agesilaus had been not yet a year in the kingly office, once while he was offering one of the appointed sacrifices in behalf of the state, the seer said that the gods revealed a conspiracy of the most 397 B.C. terrible sort. And when he sacrificed again, the seer said that the signs appeared still more terrible. And upon his sacrificing for the third time, he said: Agesilaus, just such a sign is given me as would be given if we were in the very midst of the enemy. There-upon they made offerings to the gods who avert evil and to those who grant safety, and having with difficulty obtained favourable omens, ceased sacrificing. And within five days after the sacrifice was ended a man reported to the ephors a conspiracy, and Cinadon as the head of the affair.
15. Xenophon, Constitution of The Spartans, 13.3 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

13.3. Only when the sacrifice proves acceptable to both these deities does he cross the borders of the land. And the fire from these sacrifices leads the way and is never quenched, and animals for sacrifice of every sort follow. At all times when he offers sacrifice, the King begins the work before dawn of day, wishing to forestall the goodwill of the god.
16. Aeschines, Letters, 3.113 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

17. Aristotle, Athenian Constitution, 3.3, 21.6, 27.3, 54.6, 56.3-56.4, 57.1 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

18. Demosthenes, Orations, 18.253, 19.298-19.299, 21.8-21.10, 21.12-21.13, 21.16-21.17, 21.25-21.26, 21.40, 21.42, 21.45, 21.47-21.48, 21.50-21.52, 21.54-21.61, 21.104-21.122, 21.126, 21.147, 21.171, 21.174-21.180, 21.227, 43.62, 43.64-43.66, 59.109 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

19. Lycurgus, Against Leocrates, 85-87, 84 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

20. Plutarch, Cimon, 10.7 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

21. Plutarch, Phocion, 28.4 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

22. Achilles Tatius, The Adventures of Leucippe And Cleitophon, 2.15.3 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

23. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 1.3.4 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1.3.4. Here is a picture of the exploit, near Mantinea, of the Athenians who were sent to help the Lacedaemonians. 362 B.C. Xenophon among others has written a history of the whole war—the taking of the Cadmea, the defeat of the Lacedaemonians at Leuctra, how the Boeotians invaded the Peloponnesus,and the contingent sent to the Lacedacmonians from the Athenians. In the picture is a cavalry battle, in which the most famous men are, among the Athenians, Grylus the son of Xenophon, and in the Boeotian cavalry, Epaminondas the Theban. These pictures were painted for the Athenians by Euphranor, and he also wrought the Apollo surnamed Patrous (Paternal) in the temple hard by. And in front of the temple is one Apollo made by Leochares; the other Apollo, called Averter of evil, was made by Calamis. They say that the god received this name because by an oracle from Delphi he stayed the pestilence which afflicted the Athenians at the time of the Peloponnesian War. 430 B.C.
24. Servius, Commentary On The Aeneid, 3.466 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

25. Aeschines, Or., 2.158, 3.108, 3.130

26. Epigraphy, Lscg, 180

27. Epigraphy, I.Eleusis, 229

28. Epigraphy, Ig I , 40.65-40.67

29. Epigraphy, Ig I , 40.65-40.67

30. Epigraphy, Ig Ii2, 1029-1030, 1247, 1283, 2492, 2501, 776, 1011

31. Epigraphy, Ig Xii,7, 506

32. Epigraphy, Seg, 25.140, 45.101, 45.911

33. Hildegarde of Bingen, Sciv., 8.82

34. Xenophon, Poroi, 6.2



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aeacus Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 163
agones, in city Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 171, 268, 269
agrotera Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 267
aitnaiai in sicily, lost play Eidinow, Oracles, Curses, and Risk Among the Ancient Greeks (2007) 276
alcibiades Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 20
alexandria Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 190
alochos Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 156
altars, of dionysus Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 272, 273
altars Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 269, 272
ammon oracle of Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 87
amphiaraia Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 171
amphiaraus, of oropos Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 163, 171
amphiones Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 268, 273
antiphon Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 190
aparchai, of eleusis Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 112, 176
apollo, agyieus Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 268, 269, 270
apollo, apotropaios Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 270, 275
apollo, cults of, alexikakos Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 108
apollo, patroös Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 163
apollo, prayer to delphic Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 208
apollo, prostaterios Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 171, 269, 270, 274
apollo, soter Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 268, 272, 274
apollo, zoster Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 112
apollo Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 50
apollo journey from delos to delphi Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 87
apollonia Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 50
archilochos Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 50
archons, eponymous Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 112, 126, 171
archons, of mesogeioi Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 112
arguments, religious, religious significance of Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 20
aristarchus Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 20
aristophanes Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 267
aristotle Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 267
artemis, boulaia Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 171
artemis, phosphoros Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 171
artemis Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 268, 269, 270
asclepiea Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 267
asclepieia Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 171
asclepius, of city Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 171
asebeia Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 126, 268, 269
asebia (impiety), introduction into against midias Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 19, 20, 28
athena, hypata Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 268, 272, 273
athens Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 50; Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 190
basileus, wife of Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 112
basileus Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 112, 171
calendars, sacred, of nicomachus Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 176
choregoi, of city Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 126, 268, 269, 273
choregos Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 19, 28
chresmologoi Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 156
cimon Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 267
claros Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 267
cos Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 267
crown, at dionysia Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 19, 208
dedications, to apollo soter of epidaurus Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 272
dedications, to athena hypata of epidaurus Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 272
dedications, to dione of dodona Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 270, 274
dedications, to zeus of dodona Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 163, 270
dedications Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 50; Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 163
delos Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 190, 267
delphi, consultation by mnesiepes of paros Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 50
delphi, simultaneous inquiries Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 50
delphi Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 190
demes Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 171, 176
demosthenes Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 50; Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 190
dionysia, law on Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 19, 20
dionysia Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 28
dionysius of syracuse Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 267
dionysos Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 50
dionysus (god and cult) Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 19, 20
divination, not admitted in court role in public life Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 108
divination, not admitted in court through oracles Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 108
dodona Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 50; Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 267
dreams Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 50
eleusis Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 190
eponymous heroes Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 163, 272
etymologicum magicum Eidinow, Oracles, Curses, and Risk Among the Ancient Greeks (2007) 276
euboea Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 190
euenios Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 50
euripides, on egyptian priestesses at dodona Eidinow, Oracles, Curses, and Risk Among the Ancient Greeks (2007) 276
eusebia (piety), of statutes Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 19
father-son relations Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 153
gene, role in festivals pythaides Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 87
gods, goodwill Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 208
gods, offended Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 28
gods Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 208
graphe, asebias Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 28
heortai Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 126, 176, 269, 273
hieropoioi, for expiatory sacrifices Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 281
hieropoioi Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 281
hieros (sacred), garment Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 19
homicide Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 20
hybris Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 28
hygieia Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 269, 270, 273, 274
invective, unusually strong Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 20
itanos, jason Eidinow, Oracles, Curses, and Risk Among the Ancient Greeks (2007) 276
kallieresis Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 268, 270, 281
kanephoroi Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 112
koina Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 176
kosmetai Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 112
language, sacred Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 19, 20
law, athenian. Gagarin and Cohen, The Cambridge Companion to Ancient Greek Law (2005) 206
lawgiver Gagarin and Cohen, The Cambridge Companion to Ancient Greek Law (2005) 206
lease, orgeones Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 153
lenaia Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 126
leto Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 268, 269, 270
manteis Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 281
mantitheos Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 153
marathon Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 267
meidias Gagarin and Cohen, The Cambridge Companion to Ancient Greek Law (2005) 206
metics Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 126
miaros (pollution, impurity), accusation of Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 20
midias Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 19, 20, 28
mining Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 153
mnesiepes of paros Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 50
mother of the gods, of city Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 163
mysteries, at eleusis Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 126
narratives Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 50
nicomachus, the anagrapheus Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 176
nomoi Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 126, 156, 176
nymphs Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 156, 163
oaths, crowned Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 19
oaths, sacred Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 20
oikos Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 176
olympia Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 50
olympias Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 87
omens, testing of Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 50
omens Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 268, 270, 272, 273, 281
oracles, of amphiaraus Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 163
oracles, of apollo of delphi Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 112, 126, 156, 163, 176, 268, 269, 270, 271, 272, 273, 274
oracles, of zeus of dodona Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 112, 126, 156, 163, 268, 269, 270, 271, 274, 275
oracles Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 28, 208; Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 156, 163, 176, 271, 281
perjury, allegation of Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 20
plynteria Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 163
pompai, of asclepieia Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 171
pompai, of city Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 171
poseidon, erechtheus Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 112
prayers Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 268, 269, 270, 272
priestesses, and prophecy Eidinow, Oracles, Curses, and Risk Among the Ancient Greeks (2007) 276
priests and priestesses, of apollo zoster Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 112
priests and priestesses, of asclepius, in city Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 171
priests and priestesses, of athena polias Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 112
priests and priestesses, of erechtheus and poseidon Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 112
probole Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 19, 20
proerosia Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 190
prytaneis Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 274
psephismata Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 126, 156, 176
pythaides Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 87
pythaïdes Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 163
questions, divinatory Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 50
rhetoric Gagarin and Cohen, The Cambridge Companion to Ancient Greek Law (2005) 206
sacrifice Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 112, 156, 171
sacrifices' Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 50
sanctuaries, restrictions concerning Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 269
sanctuaries Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 20; Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 163, 171, 176
shark, eats initiate Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 108
slaves, manumission Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 153
solon, calendar of Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 171, 176
solon, nomoi of Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 171, 176
soteria Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 274
statues, of zeus at olympia Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 163
strategoi, of polis Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 156
syracuse Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 267
syria, of bendis Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 176
tables, adornment of, for athena polias Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 112
temples, of amphiaraus Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 163
thargelia Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 126
thebes (mycalensic) Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 267
theopompus Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 267
theoriai, to dodona Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 270, 274
theseus Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 272
tiphys Eidinow, Oracles, Curses, and Risk Among the Ancient Greeks (2007) 276
tribes Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 163
trierarch Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 153
zeus, hypatos Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 268, 269, 270, 272
zeus, ktesios Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 270, 275
zeus, naios of dodona Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 112, 126, 156, 163, 268, 269, 270, 271, 274, 275
zeus, of dodona Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 208
zeus, olympios, of olympia Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 163
zeus Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 50