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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



4413
Demosthenes, Orations, 21.51-21.53


nanNow if I had not been chorus-master, men of Athens, when I was thus maltreated by Meidias, it is only the personal insult that one would have condemned; but under the circumstances I think one would be justified in condemning also the impiety of the act. You surely realize that all your choruses and hymns to the god are sanctioned, not only by the regulations of the Dionysia, but also by the oracles, in all of which, whether given at Delphi or at Dodona, you will find a solemn injunction to the State to set up dances after the ancestral custom, to fill the streets with the savour of sacrifice, and to wear garlands.


nanPlease take and read the actual oracles. The Oracles You I address, Pandion’s townsmen and sons of Erechtheus, who appoint your feasts by the ancient rites of your fathers. See you forget not Bacchus, and joining all in the dances Down your broad-spaced streets, in thanks ἱστάναι χάριν, if the Greek is sound, seems to be a portmanteau phrase to set up a dance in gratitude. The oracle quoted may perfectly well be genuine. for the gifts of the season, Crown each head with a wreath, while incense reeks on the altars. For health sacrifice and pray to Zeus Most High, to Heracles, and to Apollo the Protector; for good fortune to Apollo, god of the streets, to Leto, and to Artemis; and along the streets set wine-bowls and dances, and wear garlands after the manner of your fathers in honor of all gods and all goddesses of Olympus, raising right hands and left in supplication, Translating λιτάς, Weil ’s suggestion. and remember your gifts.


nanOracles from Dodona To the people of the Athenians the prophet of Zeus announces. Whereas ye have let pass the seasons of the sacrifice and of the sacred embassy, he bids you send nine chosen envoys, and that right soon. To Zeus of the Ship There was a temple at Dodona dedicated to Zeus under this title to commemorate a rescue from shipwreck. sacrifice three oxen and with each ox three sheep; to Dione one ox and a brazen table for the offering which the people of the Athenians have offered. The prophet of Zeus in Dodona announces. To Dionysus pay public sacrifices and mix a bowl of wine and set up dances; to Apollo the Averter sacrifice an ox and wear garlands, both free men and slaves, and observe one day of rest; to Zeus, the giver of wealth, a white bull.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

27 results
1. Hesiod, Works And Days, 241, 240 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

240. However, when to both the foreigner
2. Pindar, Olympian Odes, 2.4, 6.63-6.71 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

3. Antiphon, Orations, 5.82 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

4. Aristophanes, The Rich Man, 1159 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1159. ἀλλ' ἡγεμόνιον. ἀλλ' ὁ θεὸς ἤδη βλέπει
5. Aristophanes, Wasps, 875 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

875. ὦ δέσποτ' ἄναξ γεῖτον ἀγυιεῦ προθύρου προπύλαιε
6. Herodotus, Histories, 1.46, 4.155, 5.67, 5.71-5.72, 9.94 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1.46. After the loss of his son, Croesus remained in deep sorrow for two years. After this time, the destruction by Cyrus son of Cambyses of the sovereignty of Astyages son of Cyaxares, and the growth of the power of the Persians, distracted Croesus from his mourning; and he determined, if he could, to forestall the increase of the Persian power before they became great. ,Having thus determined, he at once made inquiries of the Greek and Libyan oracles, sending messengers separately to Delphi, to Abae in Phocia, and to Dodona, while others were despatched to Amphiaraus and Trophonius, and others to Branchidae in the Milesian country. ,These are the Greek oracles to which Croesus sent for divination: and he told others to go inquire of Ammon in Libya . His intent in sending was to test the knowledge of the oracles, so that, if they were found to know the truth, he might send again and ask if he should undertake an expedition against the Persians. 4.155. There Polymnestus, a notable Theraean, took Phronime and made her his concubine. In time, a son of weak and stammering speech was born to him, to whom he gave the name Battus, as the Theraeans and Cyrenaeans say; but in my opinion the boy was given some other name, ,and changed it to Battus on his coming to Libya, taking this new name because of the oracle given to him at Delphi and the honorable office which he received. For the Libyan word for king is “Battus,” and this (I believe) is why the Pythian priestess called him so in her prophecy, using a Libyan name because she knew that he was to be king in Libya. ,For when he grew to adulthood, he went to Delphi to inquire about his voice; and the priestess in answer gave him this: quote type="oracle" l met="dact"“Battus, you have come for a voice; but Lord Phoebus Apollo /l lSends you to found a city in Libya, nurse of sheep,” /l /quote just as if she addressed him using the Greek word for “king,” “Basileus, you have come for a voice,” et cetera. ,But he answered: “Lord, I came to you to ask about my speech; but you talk of other matters, things impossible to do; you tell me to plant a colony in Libya; where shall I get the power or strength of hand for it?” Battus spoke thus, but as the god would not give him another oracle and kept answering as before, he departed while the priestess was still speaking, and went away to Thera. 5.67. In doing this, to my thinking, this Cleisthenes was imitating his own mother's father, Cleisthenes the tyrant of Sicyon, for Cleisthenes, after going to war with the Argives, made an end of minstrels' contests at Sicyon by reason of the Homeric poems, in which it is the Argives and Argos which are primarily the theme of the songs. Furthermore, he conceived the desire to cast out from the land Adrastus son of Talaus, the hero whose shrine stood then as now in the very marketplace of Sicyon because he was an Argive. ,He went then to Delphi, and asked the oracle if he should cast Adrastus out, but the priestess said in response: “Adrastus is king of Sicyon, and you but a stone thrower.” When the god would not permit him to do as he wished in this matter, he returned home and attempted to devise some plan which might rid him of Adrastus. When he thought he had found one, he sent to Boeotian Thebes saying that he would gladly bring Melanippus son of Astacus into his country, and the Thebans handed him over. ,When Cleisthenes had brought him in, he consecrated a sanctuary for him in the government house itself, where he was established in the greatest possible security. Now the reason why Cleisthenes brought in Melanippus, a thing which I must relate, was that Melanippus was Adrastus' deadliest enemy, for Adrastus had slain his brother Mecisteus and his son-in-law Tydeus. ,Having then designated the precinct for him, Cleisthenes took away all Adrastus' sacrifices and festivals and gave them to Melanippus. The Sicyonians had been accustomed to pay very great honor to Adrastus because the country had once belonged to Polybus, his maternal grandfather, who died without an heir and bequeathed the kingship to him. ,Besides other honors paid to Adrastus by the Sicyonians, they celebrated his lamentable fate with tragic choruses in honor not of Dionysus but of Adrastus. Cleisthenes, however, gave the choruses back to Dionysus and the rest of the worship to Melanippus. 5.71. How the Accursed at Athens had received their name, I will now relate. There was an Athenian named Cylon, who had been a winner at Olympia. This man put on the air of one who aimed at tyranny, and gathering a company of men of like age, he attempted to seize the citadel. When he could not win it, he took sanctuary by the goddess' statue. ,He and his men were then removed from their position by the presidents of the naval boards, the rulers of Athens at that time. Although they were subject to any penalty save death, they were slain, and their death was attributed to the Alcmaeonidae. All this took place before the time of Pisistratus. 5.72. When Cleomenes had sent for and demanded the banishment of Cleisthenes and the Accursed, Cleisthenes himself secretly departed. Afterwards, however, Cleomenes appeared in Athens with no great force. Upon his arrival, he, in order to take away the curse, banished seven hundred Athenian families named for him by Isagoras. Having so done he next attempted to dissolve the Council, entrusting the offices of government to Isagoras' faction. ,The Council, however, resisted him, whereupon Cleomenes and Isagoras and his partisans seized the acropolis. The rest of the Athenians united and besieged them for two days. On the third day as many of them as were Lacedaemonians left the country under truce. ,The prophetic voice that Cleomenes heard accordingly had its fulfillment, for when he went up to the acropolis with the intention of taking possession of it, he approached the shrine of the goddess to address himself to her. The priestess rose up from her seat, and before he had passed through the door-way, she said, “Go back, Lacedaemonian stranger, and do not enter the holy place since it is not lawful that Dorians should pass in here. “My lady,” he answered, “I am not a Dorian, but an Achaean.” ,So without taking heed of the omen, he tried to do as he pleased and was, as I have said, then again cast out together with his Lacedaemonians. As for the rest, the Athenians imprisoned them under sentence of death. Among the prisoners was Timesitheus the Delphian, whose achievements of strength and courage were quite formidable. 9.94. This was the oracle given to the people of Apollonia. They kept it secret and charged certain of their townsmen to carry the business through; they acted as I will now show. Coming and sitting down by Evenius at the place where he sat, they spoke of other matters, till at last they fell to commiserating his misfortune. Guiding the conversation in this way, they asked him what compensation he would choose, if the people of Apollonia should promise to requite him for what they had done. ,He, knowing nothing of the oracle, said he would choose for a gift the lands of certain named townsmen whom he thought to have the two fairest estates in Apollonia, and a house besides which he knew to be the fairest in the town; let him (he said) have possession of these, and he would lay aside his anger, and be satisfied with that by way of restitution. ,So he said this, and those who were sitting beside him said in reply: “Evenius, the people of Apollonia hereby make you that restitution for the loss of your sight, obeying the oracle given to them.” At that he was very angry, for he learned through this the whole story and saw that they had cheated him. They did, however, buy from the possessors and give him what he had chosen, and from that day he had a natural gift of divination, through which he won fame.
7. Plato, Republic, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

8. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 2.15.2 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

2.15.2. In Theseus, however, they had a king of equal intelligence and power; and one of the chief features in his organization of the country was to abolish the council chambers and magistrates of the petty cities, and to merge them in the single council-chamber and town-hall of the present capital. Individuals might still enjoy their private property just as before, but they were henceforth compelled to have only one political center, viz. Athens ; which thus counted all the inhabitants of Attica among her citizens, so that when Theseus died he left a great state behind him. Indeed, from him dates the Synoecia, or Feast of Union; which is paid for by the state, and which the Athenians still keep in honor of the goddess.
9. Xenophon, Ways And Means, 6.2 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

10. Aristotle, Athenian Constitution, 3.3, 21.6, 56.3-56.4, 57.1 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

11. Demosthenes, Orations, 18.253, 19.128, 21.8-21.10, 21.12-21.13, 21.16-21.17, 21.25-21.26, 21.40, 21.42, 21.45, 21.47-21.48, 21.50, 21.52-21.61, 21.104-21.122, 21.126, 21.147, 21.171, 21.174-21.180, 21.227, 43.62, 43.64-43.66, 59.109 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

12. Dinarchus, Or., 1.98 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

13. Hyperides, Pro Euxenippo, 24 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

14. Plutarch, Oracles At Delphi No Longer Given In Verse, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

15. Plutarch, Placita Philosophorum (874D-911C), 28 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

16. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 8.11.12 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

8.11.12. The Athenians received an oracle from Dodona ordering them to colonize Sicily, and Sicily is a small hill not far from Athens . But they, not understanding the order, were persuaded to undertake expeditions overseas, especially the Syracusan war. More examples could be found similar to those I have given.
17. Aeschines, Or., 2.158

18. Epigraphy, Lscg, 180

19. Epigraphy, Agora Xv, 78

20. Epigraphy, I.Eleusis, 229

21. Epigraphy, Ig I , 256, 40, 136

22. Epigraphy, Ig I , 256, 40, 136

23. Epigraphy, Ig Ii2, 1177, 1247, 1283, 776, 956, 1011

24. Epigraphy, Seg, 25.140, 45.101, 45.911

25. Epigraphy, Ig Ii3, 1284, 1176

26. Hildegarde of Bingen, Sciv., 8.82

27. Xenophon, Poroi, 6.2



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
agones, in city Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 113, 171, 268, 269
agones Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 113
agonothetai Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 113
alcibiades Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 20
alochos Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 156
altars, of dionysus Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 272, 273
altars Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 269, 272
amphiaraia Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 171
amphiaraus, of oropos Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 171
amphiones Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 268, 273
antipater Eidinow, Oracles, Curses, and Risk Among the Ancient Greeks (2007) 273
aparchai, of eleusis Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 112, 176
aphrodite, pandemos Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 113
apollo, agyieus Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 268, 269, 270
apollo, apotropaios Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 270, 275
apollo, cults of, aguieus Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 18
apollo, patroös Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 113
apollo, prostaterios Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 113, 171, 269, 270, 274
apollo, soter Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 268, 272, 274
apollo, zoster Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 112
apollo Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 50
apollonia Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 50
archilochos Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 50
archons, eponymous Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 112, 126, 171
archons, of mesogeioi Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 112
arguments, religious, religious significance of Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 20
aristarchus Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 20
artemis, boulaia Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 113, 171
artemis, phosphoros Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 113, 171
artemis Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 268, 269, 270
asclepieia Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 171
asclepius, of city Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 171
asebeia Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 126, 268, 269
asebia (impiety), demosthenes avoiding notion Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 29
asebia (impiety), introduction into against midias Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 19, 20, 28, 29
astynomoi Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 113
athena, hypata Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 268, 272, 273
athens, at dodona Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 338
athens Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 50
basileus, wife of Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 112
basileus Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 112, 171
bendis (goddess) Eidinow, Oracles, Curses, and Risk Among the Ancient Greeks (2007) 273
calendars, sacred, of nicomachus Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 176
choregoi, of city Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 126, 268, 269, 273
choregos Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 19, 28, 29
chresmologoi Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 156
community, civic Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 29
crown, at dionysia Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 19
cult centres, local and regional Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 338
dedications, to apollo Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 113
dedications, to apollo soter of epidaurus Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 272
dedications, to athena hypata of epidaurus Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 272
dedications, to dione of dodona Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 270, 274
dedications, to zeus of dodona Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 270
dedications Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 50
delphi, consultation by mnesiepes of paros Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 50
delphi, simultaneous inquiries Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 50
demes Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 171, 176
demosthenes Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 50
dione (goddess) Eidinow, Oracles, Curses, and Risk Among the Ancient Greeks (2007) 273
dionysia, law on Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 19, 20
dionysia Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 28, 29
dionysos Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 50
dionysus (god and cult) Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 19, 20
dodona Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 50
dreams Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 50
eirusione Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 113
eponymous heroes Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 272
ethnic, ethne, ethnos-states, religious life in Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 338
euenios Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 50
eusebia (piety), of statutes Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 19, 29
father-son relations Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 153
gods, intervention Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 29
gods, offended Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 28
graphe, asebias Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 28
heortai Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 126, 176, 269, 273
hieros (sacred), garment Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 19
homicide Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 20
hybris Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 28
hygieia Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 269, 270, 273, 274
identity, general, ethnic Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 338
invective, unusually strong Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 20
kallieresis Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 268, 270
kanephoroi Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 112
koina Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 176
kosmetai Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 112
krison, molossian general Eidinow, Oracles, Curses, and Risk Among the Ancient Greeks (2007) 273
language, sacred Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 19, 20
law, athenian. Gagarin and Cohen, The Cambridge Companion to Ancient Greek Law (2005) 206
lawgiver Gagarin and Cohen, The Cambridge Companion to Ancient Greek Law (2005) 206
lease, orgeones Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 153
lenaia Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 113, 126
leto Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 268, 269, 270
leuktra, battle of (, leviticus, oracles in Eidinow, Oracles, Curses, and Risk Among the Ancient Greeks (2007) 259
mantitheos Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 153
meidias Gagarin and Cohen, The Cambridge Companion to Ancient Greek Law (2005) 206
metics Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 126
miaros (pollution, impurity), accusation of Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 20
midias Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 19, 20, 28, 29
migrations, myths of, boiotia Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 338
military campaigns, douglas, mary Eidinow, Oracles, Curses, and Risk Among the Ancient Greeks (2007) 259
mining Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 153
mnesiepes of paros Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 50
molossia, molossians, at dodona Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 338
mysteries, at eleusis Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 126
narratives Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 50
nicomachus, the anagrapheus Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 176
nomoi Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 126, 156, 176
nymphs Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 156
oaths, crowned Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 19
oaths, sacred Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 20
oikos Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 176
olympia Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 50
omens, testing of Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 50
omens Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 268, 270, 272, 273
oracle Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 338
oracle of klaros Versnel, Coping with the Gods: Wayward Readings in Greek Theology (2011) 46
oracles, of apollo of delphi Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 112, 126, 156, 176, 268, 269, 270, 271, 272, 273, 274
oracles, of zeus of dodona Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 112, 126, 156, 268, 269, 270, 271, 274, 275
oracles Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 28; Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 156, 176, 271
panhellenic sanctuaries, not quite panhellenic Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 338
passaron Eidinow, Oracles, Curses, and Risk Among the Ancient Greeks (2007) 273
pelasgians, at dodona Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 338
perjury, allegation of Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 20
plerosia Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 113
plutarch, on dodona Eidinow, Oracles, Curses, and Risk Among the Ancient Greeks (2007) 273
pompai, of asclepieia Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 171
pompai, of city Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 171
pompai, of eleusinian mysteries Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 113
pompai, of semnai Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 113
pompai Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 113
poseidon, erechtheus Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 112
prayer, dubitative formulas Versnel, Coping with the Gods: Wayward Readings in Greek Theology (2011) 46
prayers Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 268, 269, 270, 272
priests and priestesses, of apollo zoster Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 112
priests and priestesses, of asclepius, in city Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 171
priests and priestesses, of athena polias Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 112
priests and priestesses, of erechtheus and poseidon Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 112
probole Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 19, 20, 29
prytaneis Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 113, 274
psephismata Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 126, 156, 176
pythaïdes Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 113
pythia Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 113
questions, divinatory Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 50
religion, social coherence Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 29
rhetoric Gagarin and Cohen, The Cambridge Companion to Ancient Greek Law (2005) 206
rhetorical conventions, avoidance of inauspicious remarks Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 29
sacrifice Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 112, 113, 156, 171
sacrifices' Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 50
sanctuaries, restrictions concerning Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 269
sanctuaries Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 20; Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 171, 176
semnai Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 113
sicily, athenian expedition and defeat Eidinow, Oracles, Curses, and Risk Among the Ancient Greeks (2007) 273
skira Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 113
slaves, manumission Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 153
solon, calendar of Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 171, 176
solon, nomoi of Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 171, 176
soteria Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 274
sparta, dodona Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 338
strategoi, of polis Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 156
syria, of bendis Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 176
tables, adornment of, for athena polias Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 112
thargelia Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 126
themistokles Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 338
theoria, regional Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 338
theoriai, to dodona Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 270, 274
theoriai Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 113
theseus Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 272
thesmophoria, of piraeus Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 113
thessalians Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 338
to dodona Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 338
trierarch Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 153
votives, votive offerings, interpretations of Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 338
warfare Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 338
wool, worked for athena by parthenoi herkeios Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 18
zeus, hypatos Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 268, 269, 270, 272
zeus, ktesios Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 113, 270, 275
zeus, naios of dodona Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 112, 126, 156, 268, 269, 270, 271, 274, 275
zeus, titles of herkeios Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 18
zeus Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 50
zeus dodonaios, at dodona, archaeology Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 338
zeus dodonaios, at dodona, military character Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 338
zeus dodonaios, at dodona, oracle, oracular tree Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 338
zeus dodonaios, at dodona, regional cult centre Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 338
zeus dodonaios, at dodona, theoria to Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 338
zeus dodonaios, at dodona Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 338