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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



4413
Demosthenes, Orations, 20.70


nanTherefore his contemporaries not only granted him immunity, but also set up his statue in bronze—the first man so honored since Harmodius and Aristogiton. For they felt that he too, in breaking up the empire of the Lacedaemonians, had ended no insignificant tyranny. In order, then, that you may give a closer attention to my words, the clerk shall read the actual decrees which you then passed in favor of Conon . Read them. [The decrees are read]


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

24 results
1. Herodotus, Histories, 6.123 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

6.123. The Alcmeonidae were tyrant-haters as much as Callias, or not less so. Therefore I find it a strange and unbelievable accusation that they of all men should have held up a shield; at all times they shunned tyrants, and it was by their contrivance that the sons of Pisistratus were deposed from their tyranny. ,Thus in my judgment it was they who freed Athens much more than did Harmodius and Aristogeiton. These only enraged the remaining sons of Pisistratus by killing Hipparchus, and did nothing to end the tyranny of the rest of them; but the Alcmeonidae plainly liberated their country, if they truly were the ones who persuaded the Pythian priestess to signify to the Lacedaemonians that they should free Athens, as I have previously shown.
2. Isaeus, Orations, 5.47 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

3. Isocrates, Orations, 9.57, 15.94, 18.61, 18.65 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

4. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 6.53 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

5. Xenophon, Hellenica, 2.4.2, 4.3.11, 4.8.1, 4.8.7, 4.8.9 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

2.4.2. Presently Thrasybulus set out from Thebes with about seventy companions and seized Phyle, a strong fortress. And the Thirty marched out from the city against him with the Three Thousand and the cavalry, the weather being very fine indeed. When they reached Phyle, some of the young men were so bold as to attack the fortress at once, but they accomplished nothing and suffered some wounds themselves before they retired. 4.3.11. For it was near 394 B.C. Cnidos that the fleets sailed against one another, and Pharnabazus, who was admiral, was with the Phoenician ships, while Conon Cp. II. i. 29. Through the influence of Pharnabazus, Conon had been commissioned a Persian admiral. His fleet was Greek merely in the sense that it was manned by Greek mercenaries and volunteers. with the Greek fleet was posted in front of him. 4.8.1. As for the war by land, it was being waged in the manner described. I will now recount what happened by sea and in the cities on the coast while all these things were going on, and will describe such of the events as are worthy of record, while those which do not deserve mention I will pass over. In the first place, then, Pharnabazus and Conon, after defeating the Lacedaemonians in the naval battle, Cp. iii. 10 f. made 394 B.C. a tour of the islands and the cities on the sea coast, drove out the Laconian governors, and encouraged the cities by saying that they would not establish fortified citadels within their walls and would leave them independent. 4.8.7. In such occupations, accordingly, they passed the winter; but at the opening of spring, 393 B.C. having fully manned a large number of ships and hired a force of mercenaries besides, Pharnabazus, and Conon with him, sailed through the islands to Melos, and making that their base, went on to Lacedaemon. And first Pharnabazus put in at Pherae and laid waste this region; then he made descents at one point and another of the coast and did whatever harm he could. But being fearful because the country was destitute of harbours, because the Lacedaemonians might send relief forces, and because provisions were scarce in the land, he quickly turned about, and sailing away, came to anchor at Phoenicus in the island of Cythera. 4.8.9. But when Conon said that if he would allow him to have the fleet, he would maintain it by contributions from the islands and would meanwhile put in at Athens and aid the Athenians in rebuilding their long walls and the wall around Piraeus, Destroyed at the close of the Peloponnesian War. cp. II. ii. 20-23. adding their he knew nothing could be a heavier blow to the 393 B.C. Lacedaemonians than this. And by this act, therefore, he said, you will have conferred a favour upon the Athenians and have taken vengeance upon the Lacedaemonians, inasmuch as you will undo for them the deed for whose accomplishment they underwent the most toil and trouble. Pharnabazus, upon hearing this, eagerly dispatched him to Athens and gave him additional money for the rebuilding of the walls.
6. Aeschines, Letters, 1.25-1.27, 1.112, 3.143, 3.178-3.179, 3.187-3.190, 3.243 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

7. Aristotle, Rhetoric, None (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

8. Demosthenes, Orations, 13.22-13.23, 18.316, 19.249, 19.280, 20.14, 20.18, 20.29, 20.67-20.69, 20.71-20.72, 20.74-20.75, 20.77-20.79, 20.81-20.82, 20.86, 20.112, 20.114-20.117, 20.119-20.120, 20.127-20.130, 20.142, 20.146, 20.159, 21.62, 22.5, 22.8, 22.36-22.37, 22.72, 23.130, 23.136, 23.196-23.199, 24.180, 50.13, 60.27-60.31 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

9. Dinarchus, Or., 1.14 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

10. Diodorus Siculus, Historical Library, 14.82.2, 14.83.5-14.83.7, 14.84.4, 15.33.4 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

14.82.2.  It was their thought that, since the Lacedaemonians were hated by their allies because of their harsh rule, it would be an easy matter to overthrow their supremacy, given that the strongest states were of one mind. First of all, they set up a common Council in Corinth to which they sent representatives to form plans, and worked out in common the arrangements for the war. Then they dispatched ambassadors to the cities and caused many allies of the Lacedaemonians to withdraw from them; 14.83.5.  When they learned that the enemy's naval forces were at Cnidus, they made preparations for battle. Peisander, the Lacedaemonian admiral, set out from Cnidus with eighty-five triremes and put in at Physcus of the Chersonesus. 14.83.6.  On sailing from there he fell in with the King's fleet, and engaging the leading ships, he won the advantage over them; but when the Persians came to give aid with their triremes in close formation, all his allies fled to the land. But Peisander turned his own ship against them, believing ignoble flight to be disgraceful and unworthy of Sparta. 14.83.7.  After fighting brilliantly and slaying many of the enemy, in the end he was overcome, battling in a manner worthy of his native land. Conon pursued the Lacedaemonians as far as the land and captured fifty of their triremes. As for the crews, most of them leaped overboard and escaped by land, but about five hundred were captured. The rest of the triremes found safety at Cnidus. 14.84.4.  Something like the same eagerness for change infected all the cities, of which some expelled their Lacedaemonian garrisons and maintained their freedom, while others attached themselves to Conon. As for the Lacedaemonians, from this time they lost the sovereignty of the sea. Conon, having decided to sail with the entire fleet to Attica, put out to sea, and after bringing over to his cause the islands of the Cyclades, he sailed against the island of Cythera. 15.33.4.  After this Agesilaüs returned with his army to the Peloponnese, while the Thebans, saved by the generalship of Chabrias, though he had performed many gallant deeds in war, was particularly proud of this bit of strategy and he caused the statues which had been granted to him by his people to be erected to display that posture.
11. Pliny The Elder, Natural History, 7.152 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

12. Plutarch, Themistocles, 22.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

13. Athenaeus, The Learned Banquet, None (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

14. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 1.1.3, 1.3.2-1.3.4, 1.18.3, 1.26.2, 3.13.9, 6.3.16, 6.9.3, 6.11.2-6.11.9, 7.27.5, 10.9.7, 10.21.5-10.21.6 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1.1.3. The most noteworthy sight in the Peiraeus is a precinct of Athena and Zeus. Both their images are of bronze; Zeus holds a staff and a Victory, Athena a spear. Here is a portrait of Leosthenes and of his sons, painted by Arcesilaus. This Leosthenes at the head of the Athenians and the united Greeks defeated the Macedonians in Boeotia and again outside Thermopylae forced them into Lamia over against Oeta, and shut them up there. 323 B.C. The portrait is in the long portico, where stands a market-place for those living near the sea—those farther away from the harbor have another—but behind the portico near the sea stand a Zeus and a Demos, the work of Leochares. And by the sea Conon fl. c. 350 B.C. built a sanctuary of Aphrodite, after he had crushed the Lacedaemonian warships off Cnidus in the Carian peninsula. 394 B.C. For the Cnidians hold Aphrodite in very great honor, and they have sanctuaries of the goddess; the oldest is to her as Doritis ( Bountiful ), the next in age as Acraea ( of the Height ), while the newest is to the Aphrodite called Cnidian by men generally, but Euploia ( Fair Voyage ) by the Cnidians themselves. 1.3.2. Near the portico stand Conon, Timotheus his son and Evagoras Evagoras was a king of Salamis in Cyprus, who reigned from about 410 to 374 B.C. He favoured the Athenians, and helped Conon to defeat the Spartan fleet off Cnidus in 394 B.C. King of Cyprus, who caused the Phoenician men-of-war to be given to Conon by King Artaxerxes. This he did as an Athenian whose ancestry connected him with Salamis, for he traced his pedigree back to Teucer and the daughter of Cinyras. Here stands Zeus, called Zeus of Freedom, and the Emperor Hadrian, a benefactor to all his subjects and especially to the city of the Athenians. 1.3.3. A portico is built behind with pictures of the gods called the Twelve. On the wall opposite are painted Theseus, Democracy and Demos. The picture represents Theseus as the one who gave the Athenians political equality. By other means also has the report spread among men that Theseus bestowed sovereignty upon the people, and that from his time they continued under a democratical government, until Peisistratus rose up and became despot. 560-527 B.C. But there are many false beliefs current among the mass of mankind, since they are ignorant of historical science and consider trustworthy whatever they have heard from childhood in choruses and tragedies; one of these is about Theseus, who in fact himself became king, and afterwards, when Menestheus was dead, the descendants of Theseus remained rulers even to the fourth generation. But if I cared about tracing the pedigree I should have included in the list, besides these, the kings from Melanthus to Cleidicus the son of Aesimides. 1.3.4. Here is a picture of the exploit, near Mantinea, of the Athenians who were sent to help the Lacedaemonians. 362 B.C. Xenophon among others has written a history of the whole war—the taking of the Cadmea, the defeat of the Lacedaemonians at Leuctra, how the Boeotians invaded the Peloponnesus,and the contingent sent to the Lacedacmonians from the Athenians. In the picture is a cavalry battle, in which the most famous men are, among the Athenians, Grylus the son of Xenophon, and in the Boeotian cavalry, Epaminondas the Theban. These pictures were painted for the Athenians by Euphranor, and he also wrought the Apollo surnamed Patrous (Paternal) in the temple hard by. And in front of the temple is one Apollo made by Leochares; the other Apollo, called Averter of evil, was made by Calamis. They say that the god received this name because by an oracle from Delphi he stayed the pestilence which afflicted the Athenians at the time of the Peloponnesian War. 430 B.C. 1.18.3. Hard by is the Prytaneum (Town-hall), in which the laws of Solon are inscribed, and figures are placed of the goddesses Peace and Hestia (Hearth), while among the statues is Autolycus the pancratiast. See Paus. 1.35.6 . For the likenesses of Miltiades and Themistocles have had their titles changed to a Roman and a Thracian. 1.26.2. So Athens was delivered from the Macedonians, and though all the Athenians fought memorably, Leocritus the son of Protarchus is said to have displayed most daring in the engagement. For he was the first to scale the fortification, and the first to rush into the Museum; and when he fell fighting, the Athenians did him great honor, dedicating his shield to Zeus of Freedom and in scribing on it the name of Leocritus and his exploit. 3.13.9. An old wooden image they call that of Aphrodite Hera. A mother is wont to sacrifice to the goddess when a daughter is married. On the road to the right of the hill is a statue of Hetoemocles. Both Hetoemocles himself and his father Hipposthenes won Olympic victories for wrestling the two together won eleven, but Hipposthenes succeeded in beating his son by one victory. 6.3.16. But when fortune changed again, and Conon had won the naval action off Cnidus and the mountain called Dorium 394 B.C., the Ionians likewise changed their views, and there are to be seen statues in bronze of Conon and of Timotheus both in the sanctuary of Hera in Samos and also in the sanctuary of the Ephesian goddess at Ephesus . It is always the same; the Ionians merely follow the example of all the world in paying court to strength. 6.9.3. Aristeus of Argos himself won a victory in the long-race, while his father Cheimon won the wrestling-match. They stand near to each other, the statue of Aristeus being by Pantias of Chios, the pupil of his father Sostratus. Besides the statue of Cheimon at Olympia there is another in the temple of Peace at Rome, brought there from Argos . Both are in my opinion among the most glorious works of Naucydes. It is also told how Cheimon overthrew at wrestling Taurosthenes of Aegina, how Taurosthenes at the next Festival overthrew all who entered for the wrestling-match, and how a wraith like Taurosthenes appeared on that day in Aegina and announced the victory. 6.11.2. Not far from the kings mentioned stands a Thasian, Theagenes the son of Timosthenes. The Thasians say that Timosthenes was not the father of Theagenes, but a priest of the Thasian Heracles, a phantom of whom in the likeness of Timosthenes had intercourse with the mother of Theagenes. In his ninth year, they say, as he was going home from school, he was attracted by a bronze image of some god or other in the marketplace; so he caught up the image, placed it on one of his shoulders and carried it home. 6.11.3. The citizens were enraged at what he had done, but one of them, a respected man of advanced years, bade them not to kill the lad, and ordered him to carry the image from his home back again to the market-place. This he did, and at once became famous for his strength, his feat being noised abroad through-out Greece . 6.11.4. The achievements of Theagenes at the Olympian games have already—the most famous of them—been described Paus. 6.6.5 in my story, how he beat Euthymus the boxer, and how he was fined by the Eleans. On this occasion the pancratium, it is said, was for the first time on record won without a contest, the victor being Dromeus of Mantineia . At the Festival following this, Theagenes was the winner in the pancratium. 6.11.5. He also won three victories at Pytho . These were for boxing, while nine prizes at Nemea and ten at the Isthmus were won in some cases for the pancratium and in others for boxing. At Phthia in Thessaly he gave up training for boxing and the pancratium. He devoted himself to winning fame among the Greeks for his running also, and beat those who entered for the long race. His ambition was, I think, to rival Achilles by winning a prize for running in the fatherland of the swiftest of those who are called heroes. The total number of crowns that he won was one thousand four hundred. 6.11.6. When he departed this life, one of those who were his enemies while he lived came every night to the statue of Theagenes and flogged the bronze as though he were ill-treating Theagenes himself. The statue put an end to the outrage by falling on him, but the sons of the dead man prosecuted the statue for murder. So the Thasians dropped the statue to the bottom of the sea, adopting the principle of Draco, who, when he framed for the Athenians laws to deal with homicide, inflicted banishment even on lifeless things, should one of them fall and kill a man. 6.11.7. But in course of time, when the earth yielded no crop to the Thasians, they sent envoys to Delphi, and the god instructed them to receive back the exiles. At this command they received them back, but their restoration brought no remedy of the famine. So for the second time they went to the Pythian priestess, saying that although they had obeyed her instructions the wrath of the gods still abode with them. 6.11.8. Whereupon the Pythian priestess replied to them :— But you have forgotten your great Theagenes. And when they could not think of a contrivance to recover the statue of Theagenes, fishermen, they say, after putting out to sea for a catch of fish caught the statue in their net and brought it back to land. The Thasians set it up in its original position, and are wont to sacrifice to him as to a god. 6.11.9. There are many other places that I know of, both among Greeks and among barbarians, where images of Theagenes have been set up, who cures diseases and receives honors from the natives. The statue of Theagenes is in the Altis, being the work of Glaucias of Aegina . 7.27.5. There is an old gymnasium chiefly given up to the exercises of the youths. No one may be enrolled on the register of citizens before he has been on the register of youths. Here stands a man of Pellene called Promachus, the son of Dryon, who won prizes in the pancratium, one at Olympia, three at the Isthmus and two at Nemea . The Pellenians made two statues of him, dedicating one at Olympia and one in the gymnasium; the latter is of stone, not bronze. 10.9.7. Opposite these are offerings of the Lacedaemonians from spoils of the Athenians: the Dioscuri, Zeus, Apollo, Artemis, and beside these Poseidon, Lysander, son of Aristocritus, represented as being crowned by Poseidon, Agias, soothsayer to Lysander on the occasion of his victory, and Hermon, who steered his flag-ship. 10.21.5. On this day the Attic contingent surpassed the other Greeks in courage. of the Athenians themselves the bravest was Cydias, a young man who had never before been in battle. He was killed by the Gauls, but his relatives dedicated his shield to Zeus God of Freedom, and the inscription ran:— Here hang I, yearning for the still youthful bloom of Cydias, The shield of a glorious man, an offering to Zeus. I was the very first through which at this battle he thrust his left arm, When the battle raged furiously against the Gaul . 10.21.6. This inscription remained until Sulla and his army took away, among other Athenian treasures, the shields in the porch of Zeus, God of Freedom. After this battle at Thermopylae the Greeks buried their own dead and spoiled the barbarians, but the Gauls sent no herald to ask leave to take up the bodies, and were indifferent whether the earth received them or whether they were devoured by wild beasts or carrion birds.
15. Aeschines, Or., 1.25-1.27, 1.112, 3.143, 3.178-3.179, 3.184, 3.187-3.190, 3.243

16. Andocides, Orations, 1.45, 1.96-1.98, 2.11-2.12, 2.17-2.18

17. Andocides, Orations, 1.45, 1.96-1.98, 2.11-2.12, 2.17-2.18

18. Epigraphy, Ig I , 40, 131

19. Epigraphy, Ig I , 40, 131

20. Epigraphy, Ig Ii2, 1140, 1656-1661, 2790, 40, 70, 10

21. Epigraphy, Inscr. De Delos, 1521

22. Epigraphy, Rhodes & Osborne Ghi, 4

23. Epigraphy, Agora, 15.1-15.25

24. Lycurgus, Orations, 1.127



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
admission into an association Gabrielsen and Paganini, Private Associations in the Ancient Greek World: Regulations and the Creation of Group Identity (2021) 51
aeschines Gygax and Zuiderhoek, Benefactors and the Polis: The Public Gift in the Greek Cities from the Homeric World to Late Antiquity (2021) 81
aglauros Henderson, The Springtime of the People: The Athenian Ephebeia and Citizen Training from Lykourgos to Augustus (2020) 143
agora xi–xiii Henderson, The Springtime of the People: The Athenian Ephebeia and Citizen Training from Lykourgos to Augustus (2020) 143
agorai Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 126, 192
ambassadors Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 244
anti-tyrannical legislation Amendola, The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary (2022) 395
antipater Amendola, The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary (2022) 395
aphrodite Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 193
apollodorus, trierarch in Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 244
aristogeiton (tyrant-slayer) Amendola, The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary (2022) 395
arrhachion of phigalia Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 126
arrian Amendola, The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary (2022) 395
asia minor Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 192
ateleia Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 192, 241, 244
athenian Gygax and Zuiderhoek, Benefactors and the Polis: The Public Gift in the Greek Cities from the Homeric World to Late Antiquity (2021) 84
athens, agora of Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 193
athens, and identity Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 45
athens, conventions of memorialization in Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 268
athens, its resources in the fourth century bc Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 244
athens Gygax and Zuiderhoek, Benefactors and the Polis: The Public Gift in the Greek Cities from the Homeric World to Late Antiquity (2021) 81
banquets, associations Gabrielsen and Paganini, Private Associations in the Ancient Greek World: Regulations and the Creation of Group Identity (2021) 51
banquets Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 193
bronze statues Amendola, The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary (2022) 395
chabrias Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 241, 244
cheimon of argos Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 126
civic life Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 268
clients, cnidus, battle of Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 192, 193
collective memory, manipulation of Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 164, 244
conon Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 126, 192, 193, 241; Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 45, 104
contributions and fees, associations Gabrielsen and Paganini, Private Associations in the Ancient Greek World: Regulations and the Creation of Group Identity (2021) 51
crowns, gold crowns Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 192, 244
crowns Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 244
cyprus Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 193
decrees, associations Gabrielsen and Paganini, Private Associations in the Ancient Greek World: Regulations and the Creation of Group Identity (2021) 51
deipnon Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 244
demetrios poliorketes Marincola et al., Lloyd Llewellyn-Jones and Calum Maciver, Greek Notions of the Past in the Archaic and Classical Eras: History Without Historians (2021) 291
demokratia Henderson, The Springtime of the People: The Athenian Ephebeia and Citizen Training from Lykourgos to Augustus (2020) 143
demos Henderson, The Springtime of the People: The Athenian Ephebeia and Citizen Training from Lykourgos to Augustus (2020) 143
demosthenes, on themistocles Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 104
demosthenes, orator Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 126, 193, 241
demosthenes, works, against leptines Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 45
demosthenes Gygax and Zuiderhoek, Benefactors and the Polis: The Public Gift in the Greek Cities from the Homeric World to Late Antiquity (2021) 81, 84; Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 45
dinarchus of corinth (politician) Amendola, The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary (2022) 395
diocleides Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 244
dôreai Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 193, 241
eirene Henderson, The Springtime of the People: The Athenian Ephebeia and Citizen Training from Lykourgos to Augustus (2020) 143
eisphorai Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 244
entrance-fees, associations Gabrielsen and Paganini, Private Associations in the Ancient Greek World: Regulations and the Creation of Group Identity (2021) 51
eponymous heroes Henderson, The Springtime of the People: The Athenian Ephebeia and Citizen Training from Lykourgos to Augustus (2020) 143
erekhtheus Henderson, The Springtime of the People: The Athenian Ephebeia and Citizen Training from Lykourgos to Augustus (2020) 143
euagoras (king of salamis) Henderson, The Springtime of the People: The Athenian Ephebeia and Citizen Training from Lykourgos to Augustus (2020) 143
euergetism, democratization of Gygax and Zuiderhoek, Benefactors and the Polis: The Public Gift in the Greek Cities from the Homeric World to Late Antiquity (2021) 84
euergetism Gabrielsen and Paganini, Private Associations in the Ancient Greek World: Regulations and the Creation of Group Identity (2021) 51
evagoras i, king of salamis Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 192, 193
exemption from Gabrielsen and Paganini, Private Associations in the Ancient Greek World: Regulations and the Creation of Group Identity (2021) 51
gauer, w. Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 268
gifts, and dependence Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 244
gifts, and social status Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 164
grain supply Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 192
gymnasia Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 126
harmodius Amendola, The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary (2022) 395
harmodius and aristogiton Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 164, 192, 193, 244
herms Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 268
heroization, risk of Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 268
hetoemocles of sparta Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 126
hierarchy, associations Gabrielsen and Paganini, Private Associations in the Ancient Greek World: Regulations and the Creation of Group Identity (2021) 51
hipparchus Amendola, The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary (2022) 395
honors, controversy surrounding Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 241
honours Gygax and Zuiderhoek, Benefactors and the Polis: The Public Gift in the Greek Cities from the Homeric World to Late Antiquity (2021) 84
iphicrates Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 244
isocrates Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 244
isonomia Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 164
khaironeia, battle of xiii Henderson, The Springtime of the People: The Athenian Ephebeia and Citizen Training from Lykourgos to Augustus (2020) 143
knidos Henderson, The Springtime of the People: The Athenian Ephebeia and Citizen Training from Lykourgos to Augustus (2020) 143
konon Henderson, The Springtime of the People: The Athenian Ephebeia and Citizen Training from Lykourgos to Augustus (2020) 143
kosmetes Henderson, The Springtime of the People: The Athenian Ephebeia and Citizen Training from Lykourgos to Augustus (2020) 143
kritios Amendola, The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary (2022) 395
leptines Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 241
liturgies, exemption from Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 192, 241
liturgies, in fourth-century athens Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 244
lokhagos Henderson, The Springtime of the People: The Athenian Ephebeia and Citizen Training from Lykourgos to Augustus (2020) 143
long walls (athens) Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 193
lysias, on themistocles and theramenes Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 104
marathon, battle of Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 241
megistai timai Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 192
military commanders, honors for Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 192, 241
miltiades Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 241
money, for construction projects Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 193
negotiability, of morality of military trickery Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 104
nesiotes Amendola, The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary (2022) 395
pausanias the periegete Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 126
pellene Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 126
peloponnesian war Gygax and Zuiderhoek, Benefactors and the Polis: The Public Gift in the Greek Cities from the Homeric World to Late Antiquity (2021) 84; Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 192, 244
perdiccas Amendola, The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary (2022) 395
persia, persians Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 192
pharnabazus Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 193
piraeus Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 192
pisistratus Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 164
plutarch Amendola, The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary (2022) 395
proedria Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 164, 192
prytaneion Gygax and Zuiderhoek, Benefactors and the Polis: The Public Gift in the Greek Cities from the Homeric World to Late Antiquity (2021) 81, 84
psenamosis, synodos of fellow farmers/landowners of Gabrielsen and Paganini, Private Associations in the Ancient Greek World: Regulations and the Creation of Group Identity (2021) 51
public praise Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 244
sacrifices Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 193
salamis (cyprus), salamis, battle of Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 241
sitêsis Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 164, 192
sophronistes Henderson, The Springtime of the People: The Athenian Ephebeia and Citizen Training from Lykourgos to Augustus (2020) 143
sparta, spartans Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 192, 193
sparta Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 268
statues, honorific Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 268
statues, in athens Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 126, 241
statues, in the agora Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 126, 192
statues, of aristoclidas of aegina Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 126
statues, of arrhachion of phigalia Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 126
statues, of athletes Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 126
statues, of chabrias Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 244
statues, of cheimon of argos Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 126
statues, of conon Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 244
statues, of euthycles of locri Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 126
statues, of euthymus of locri Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 126
statues, of evagoras i, king of salamis Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 193
statues, of harmodius and aristogiton Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 126, 193
statues, of hetoemocles of sparta Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 126
statues, of iphicrates Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 244
statues, of military commanders Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 126, 192, 241, 244
statues, of miltiades Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 126
statues, of promachus of pellene Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 126
statues, of theagenes of thasos Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 126
statues, of themistocles Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 126
statues, of timotheus Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 244
stoa of zeus (athens) Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 192
stoa of zeus eleutherios Henderson, The Springtime of the People: The Athenian Ephebeia and Citizen Training from Lykourgos to Augustus (2020) 143
temple, of aphrodite euploia Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 193
thasos Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 126
theater' Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 268
themistocles, as discussed in oratory Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 104
themistocles, compared with conon Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 104
themistocles, compared with theramenes Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 104
themistocles Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 241
thirty tyrants Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 192, 244
thucydides, historian Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 164
timai Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 241
timotheos (general) Henderson, The Springtime of the People: The Athenian Ephebeia and Citizen Training from Lykourgos to Augustus (2020) 143
tour of sanctuaries Henderson, The Springtime of the People: The Athenian Ephebeia and Citizen Training from Lykourgos to Augustus (2020) 143
triêrarchiai, triêrarchoi Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 244
tyrannicides Amendola, The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary (2022) 395
tyrants Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 164
victor aristoclidas of aegina Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 126
virtues, eutaxia (discipline, good order) Henderson, The Springtime of the People: The Athenian Ephebeia and Citizen Training from Lykourgos to Augustus (2020) 143
virtues, peitharkhia (obedience) Henderson, The Springtime of the People: The Athenian Ephebeia and Citizen Training from Lykourgos to Augustus (2020) 143
virtues, sophrosyne (self-mastery, self-control, moderation, modesty) Henderson, The Springtime of the People: The Athenian Ephebeia and Citizen Training from Lykourgos to Augustus (2020) 143
walls Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 193
zeus eleutherios Henderson, The Springtime of the People: The Athenian Ephebeia and Citizen Training from Lykourgos to Augustus (2020) 143