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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



4413
Demosthenes, Orations, 20.127-20.130


nanFor the first clause of the law says Leptines proposed that, to the end that the wealthiest citizens may perform the public services, none shall be immune save and except the descendants of Harmodius and Aristogiton. But if immunity from religious duties were the same as immunity from public services, what was the object of that clause? For immunity from religious duties has never been granted even to the persons here named. To prove that this is so, please take and read the copy of the inscription and then the beginning of the law of Leptines. [The copy of the inscription is read]


nanYou hear the copy of the inscription, men of Athens, ordering them to be immune, save from religious duties. Now read the beginning of the law of Leptines. [The law is read Good; stop there. After the words to the end that the wealthiest citizens may perform the public services, he added no one shall be immune save and except, the descendants of Harmodius and Aristogiton. Why so, if to pay for a religious rite is to perform a public service? For if that is his meaning, his own drafting will be found to contradict the inscription.


nanNow I should like to put a question to Leptines. When you say that the public services come under the head of religious dues, in what, according to you, did the immunity consist, which our ancestors then granted and you now leave untouched? For by the old laws they are not immune from all the special war-taxes or from the equipment of war-galleys; and they enjoy no immunity from the state services, since they are included in the religious duties.


nanAnd yet the inscription says that they shall be immune. From what? From the tax on resident aliens, since nothing else is left? Of course not. It is from the regularly recurring services, as the inscription shows, as your law further specifies, and as all history witnesses. During all that length of time no tribe has ever ventured to nominate one of these descendants as chorus-master, and no one nominated has ever ventured to challenge them to an exchange of property. If Leptines dares to deny it, you must pay no heed to him.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

21 results
1. Aristophanes, Women of The Assembly, 22 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

22. ἃς Φυρόμαχός ποτ' εἶπεν, εἰ μέμνησθ' ἔτι
2. Aristophanes, Frogs, 1064, 1063 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1063. πρῶτον μὲν τοὺς βασιλεύοντας ῥάκι' ἀμπισχών, ἵν' ἐλεινοὶ
3. Herodotus, Histories, 5.55 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

5.55. When he was forced to leave Sparta, Aristagoras went to Athens, which had been freed from its ruling tyrants in the manner that I will show. First Hipparchus, son of Pisistratus and brother of the tyrant Hippias, had been slain by Aristogiton and Harmodius, men of Gephyraean descent. This was in fact an evil of which he had received a premonition in a dream. After this the Athenians were subject for four years to a tyranny not less but even more absolute than before.
4. Isaeus, Orations, 5.47 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

5. Isocrates, Orations, 8.128, 9.57, 15.94, 18.59-18.61, 18.65 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

6. Lysias, Orations, 21.12 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

7. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 6.56 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

8. Xenophon, Hellenica, 2.4.2 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

2.4.2. Presently Thrasybulus set out from Thebes with about seventy companions and seized Phyle, a strong fortress. And the Thirty marched out from the city against him with the Three Thousand and the cavalry, the weather being very fine indeed. When they reached Phyle, some of the young men were so bold as to attack the fortress at once, but they accomplished nothing and suffered some wounds themselves before they retired.
9. Xenophon, Constitution of The Athenians, 1.13 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

10. Xenophon, Symposium, 4.30 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

4.30. Now, as for my situation in our commonwealth, when I was rich, I was, to begin with, in dread of some one’s digging through the wall of my house and not only getting my money but also doing me a mischief personally; in the next place, I knuckled down to the blackmailers, knowing well enough that my abilities lay more in the direction of suffering injury than of inflicting it on them. Then, too, I was for ever being ordered by the government to undergo some expenditure or other, and I never had the opportunity for foreign travel.
11. Aeschines, Letters, 3.143, 3.187-3.190, 3.243 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

12. Aristotle, Athenian Constitution, 57-58, 56 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

13. Demosthenes, Orations, 19.280, 20.18, 20.29, 20.70, 20.75, 20.79, 20.86, 20.128-20.130, 20.141, 20.146, 20.159, 21.16, 21.62, 22.72, 23.130, 23.136, 24.180, 50.13 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

14. Diodorus Siculus, Historical Library, 15.33.4 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

15.33.4.  After this Agesilaüs returned with his army to the Peloponnese, while the Thebans, saved by the generalship of Chabrias, though he had performed many gallant deeds in war, was particularly proud of this bit of strategy and he caused the statues which had been granted to him by his people to be erected to display that posture.
15. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 1.3.2 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1.3.2. Near the portico stand Conon, Timotheus his son and Evagoras Evagoras was a king of Salamis in Cyprus, who reigned from about 410 to 374 B.C. He favoured the Athenians, and helped Conon to defeat the Spartan fleet off Cnidus in 394 B.C. King of Cyprus, who caused the Phoenician men-of-war to be given to Conon by King Artaxerxes. This he did as an Athenian whose ancestry connected him with Salamis, for he traced his pedigree back to Teucer and the daughter of Cinyras. Here stands Zeus, called Zeus of Freedom, and the Emperor Hadrian, a benefactor to all his subjects and especially to the city of the Athenians.
16. Aeschines, Or., 3.143, 3.187-3.190, 3.243

17. Andocides, Orations, 1.45, 1.98, 2.11-2.12, 2.17-2.18

18. Andocides, Orations, 1.45, 1.98, 2.11-2.12, 2.17-2.18

19. Epigraphy, Ig I , 131

20. Epigraphy, Ig I , 131

21. Epigraphy, Ig Ii2, 70, 40



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
alexander iii of macedon vii Amendola, The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary (2022) 374
ambassadors Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 244
antenor Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 162
anti-tyrannical legislation Amendola, The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary (2022) 395
antidosis Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 150
antipater Amendola, The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary (2022) 374, 395
apollo, delphic Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 26
apollodorus, trierarch in Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 244
aristogeiton (tyrant-slayer) Amendola, The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary (2022) 395
arrian Amendola, The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary (2022) 395
ateleia Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 150, 244
athenian Gygax and Zuiderhoek, Benefactors and the Polis: The Public Gift in the Greek Cities from the Homeric World to Late Antiquity (2021) 78
athens, acropolis of Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 162
athens, agora of Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 162
athens, its resources in the fourth century bc Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 244
athens Gygax and Zuiderhoek, Benefactors and the Polis: The Public Gift in the Greek Cities from the Homeric World to Late Antiquity (2021) 78
athletic victories, as benefactions Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 162
attic oratory Amendola, The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary (2022) 374
bronze statues Amendola, The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary (2022) 395
chabrias Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 244
choregos Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 26, 244
collective memory, manipulation of Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 244
critius Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 162
crown, at celebrations Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 26
crown, at dionysia Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 26
crowns, gold crowns Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 244
crowns Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 244
deipnon Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 244
demos, and elite Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 150
dinarchus of corinth (politician) Amendola, The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary (2022) 395
diocleides Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 244
dionysia, demosthenes role at Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 26
eisphorai Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 244
elite, and competition Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 150
elite, display by Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 150
festivals Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 162
finances, public Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 239
finances, sacred Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 26, 244
gifts, and coercion Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 150
gifts, and dependence Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 150, 244
gifts, and power Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 150
gods Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 26
harmodius Amendola, The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary (2022) 395
harmodius and aristogiton Gygax and Zuiderhoek, Benefactors and the Polis: The Public Gift in the Greek Cities from the Homeric World to Late Antiquity (2021) 78; Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 150, 244
hieros (sacred), expenditures Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 26, 244
hieros (sacred), garment Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 26
hipparchus, tyrant Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 162
hipparchus Amendola, The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary (2022) 395
honours Gygax and Zuiderhoek, Benefactors and the Polis: The Public Gift in the Greek Cities from the Homeric World to Late Antiquity (2021) 78
iphicrates Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 244
isocrates Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 244
isonomia Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 162
kritios Amendola, The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary (2022) 395
language, leptines Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 239
liturgical class Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 150
liturgies, avoidance of Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 150
liturgies, exemption from Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 162
liturgies, in fifth-century athens Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 150
liturgies, in fourth-century athens Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 244
liturgies, obligatory Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 150
liturgy Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 244
midias Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 26
nesiotes Amendola, The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary (2022) 395; Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 162
oaths, archon Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 26
old oligarch Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 150
olympia Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 162
oracles, ordering crowns Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 26
oratorical corpora Amendola, The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary (2022) 374
panathenaea Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 162
peloponnesian war Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 150, 244
perdiccas Amendola, The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary (2022) 395
pericles Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 162
persia, persians Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 162
plutarch Amendola, The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary (2022) 395
popular beliefs, in speeches Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 244
priests, status of Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 26
proedria Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 162
prytaneion Gygax and Zuiderhoek, Benefactors and the Polis: The Public Gift in the Greek Cities from the Homeric World to Late Antiquity (2021) 78; Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 162
prytaneion decree Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 150, 162
public praise Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 244
rhetoric, manipulation of views Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 26
rich, the Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 150
rites' Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 244
sculptors Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 162
simonides Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 162
sitêsis Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 162
social distance Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 150
statues, of chabrias Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 244
statues, of conon Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 244
statues, of harmodius and aristogiton Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 162
statues, of iphicrates Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 244
statues, of military commanders Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 244
statues, of timotheus Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 244
thebes Amendola, The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary (2022) 374
thirty tyrants Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 244
triêrarchiai, triêrarchoi Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 244
tyrannicides Amendola, The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary (2022) 395
wilamowitz-moellendorff, ulrich von Amendola, The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary (2022) 374