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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



4413
Demosthenes, Orations, 18.259-18.260


nanOn arriving at manhood you assisted your mother in her initiations, in her initiations: she was an expert in Bacchic or Sabazian rites imported from Phrygia . reading the service-book while she performed the ritual, and helping generally with the paraphernalia. At night it was your duty to mix the libations, to clothe the catechumens in fawn-skins, to wash their bodies, to scour them with the loam and the bran, and, when their lustration was duly performed, to set them on their legs, and give out the hymn: Here I leave my sins behind, Here the better way I find; and it was your pride that no one ever emitted that holy ululation so powerfully as yourself. I can well believe it! When you hear the stentorian tones of the orator, can you doubt that the ejaculations of the acolyte were simply magnificent?


nanIn day-time you marshalled your gallant throng of bacchanals through the public streets, their heads garlanded with fennel and white poplar; and, as you went, you squeezed the fat-cheeked snakes, or brandished them above your head, now shouting your Euoi Saboi! now footing it to the measure of Hyes Attes! Attes Hyes!—saluted by all the old women with such proud titles as Master of the Ceremonies, Fugleman, Ivy-bearer, Fan-carrier; and at last receiving your recompense of tipsy-cakes, and cracknels, and currant-buns. With such rewards who would not rejoice greatly, and account himself the favorite of fortune?


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

37 results
1. Antiphanes, Fragments, 152 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

2. Antiphanes, Fragments, 152 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

3. Aristophanes, Knights, 105 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

105. ἴθι νυν ἄκρατον ἐγκάναξόν μοι πολὺν
4. Aristophanes, Lysistrata, 2-3, 1 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1. ἀλλ' εἴ τις ἐς Βακχεῖον αὐτὰς ἐκάλεσεν
5. Aristophanes, The Rich Man, 571 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

571. ἀλλ' οὐ ψεύδει τούτων γ' οὐδέν, καίπερ σφόδρα βάσκανος οὖσα.
6. Euripides, Bacchae, 177, 221-225, 686-688, 827-838, 176 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

176. θύρσους ἀνάπτειν καὶ νεβρῶν δορὰς ἔχειν
7. Euripides, Cyclops, 607, 606 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

606. ἢ τὴν τύχην μὲν δαίμον' ἡγεῖσθαι χρεών
8. Euripides, Fragments, 952 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

9. Euripides, Ion, 551-553, 550 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

550. Didst thou in days gone by come to the Pythian rock? Xuthu
10. Herodotus, Histories, 3.24, 7.28 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

3.24. Last after this they viewed the Ethiopian coffins; these are said to be made of alabaster, as I shall describe: ,they cause the dead body to shrink, either as the Egyptians do or in some other way, then cover it with gypsum and paint it all as far as possible in the likeness of the living man; ,then they set it within a hollow pillar of alabaster, which they dig in abundance from the ground, and it is easily worked; the body can be seen in the pillar through the alabaster, no evil stench nor anything unpleasant proceeding from it, and showing clearly all its parts, as if it were the man himself. ,The nearest of kin keep the pillar in their house for a year, giving it of the first-fruits and offering it sacrifices; after which they bring the pillars out and set them round about the city. 7.28. Xerxes marvelled at this last saying and next himself asked Pythius how much wealth he had. “O king,” said Pythius, “I will not conceal the quantity of my property from you, nor pretend that I do not know; I know and will tell you the exact truth. ,As soon as I learned that you were coming down to the Greek sea, I wanted to give you money for the war, so I inquired into the matter, and my reckoning showed me that I had two thousand talents of silver, and four million Daric staters of gold, lacking seven thousand. ,All this I freely give to you; for myself, I have a sufficient livelihood from my slaves and my farms.”
11. Lysias, Orations, 5.5 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

12. Plato, Meno, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

81a. Men. Now does it seem to you to be a good argument, Socrates? Soc. It does not. Men. Can you explain how not? Soc. I can; for I have heard from wise men and women who told of things divine that— Men. What was it they said ? Soc. Something true, as I thought, and admirable. Men. What was it? And who were the speakers? Soc. They were certain priests and priestesses who have studied so as to be able to give a reasoned account of their ministry; and Pindar also
13. Plato, Republic, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

363c. Barley and wheat, and his trees are laden and weighted with fair fruits, Increase comes to his flocks and the ocean is teeming with fishes. Hom. Od. 19.109
14. Plato, Symposium, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

203d. rather is he hard and parched, shoeless and homeless; on the bare ground always he lies with no bedding, and takes his rest on doorsteps and waysides in the open air; true to his mother’s nature, he ever dwells with want. But he takes after his father in scheming for all that is beautiful and good; for he is brave, strenuous and high-strung, a famous hunter, always weaving some stratagem; desirous and competent of wisdom, throughout life ensuing the truth; a master of jugglery, witchcraft
15. Sophocles, Oedipus The King, 388, 387 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

16. Xenophon, Hellenica, 4.5.13-4.5.14 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

4.5.13. But those in the city of the Corinthians, both Callias, the son of Hipponicus, commander of the Athenian hoplites, and Iphicrates, leader of the peltasts, when they descried the Lacedaemonians and saw that they were not only few in number, but also unaccompanied by either peltasts or cavalry, thought that it was safe to attack them with their force of peltasts. For if they should proceed along the road, they could be attacked with javelins on their unprotected side and destroyed; and if they should undertake to pursue, they with their peltasts, the nimblest of all troops, could easily escape the hoplites. 4.5.14. Having come to this conclusion, they led forth their troops. And Callias formed his hoplites in line of battle not far from the city, while Iphicrates with his peltasts attacked the Lacedaemonian regiment. Now when the Lacedaemonians 390 B.C. were being attacked with javelins, and several men had been wounded and several others slain, they directed the shield-bearers Slaves who carried the shields of the hoplites. to take up these wounded men and carry them back to Lechaeum; and these were the only men in the regiment who were really saved. i.e., saved both in life and in honour. Then the polemarch ordered the first ten year-classes See note on II. iv. 32. to drive off their assailants.
17. Aeschines, Letters, 2.124, 2.153, 3.137 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

18. Aristotle, Poetics, None (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

19. Demosthenes, Orations, 18.119, 18.132, 18.242, 18.253, 18.257-18.258, 18.260-18.262, 18.265, 18.267-18.269, 18.276-18.285, 18.287-18.291, 18.294-18.296, 18.308, 19.199, 21.209, 25.80-25.83 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

20. Dinarchus, Or., 1.92 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

21. Theophrastus, Characters, 16 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

22. Diodorus Siculus, Historical Library, 4.2.5 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4.2.5.  After he had received his rearing by the nymphs in Nysa, they say, he made the discovery of wine and taught mankind how to cultivate the vine. And as he visited the inhabited world almost in its entirety, he brought much land under cultivation and in return for this received most high honours at the hands of all men. He also discovered the drink made out of barley and called by some zythos, the bouquet of which is not much inferior to that of wine. The preparation of this drink he taught to those peoples whose country was unsuited to the cultivation of the vine.
23. Horace, Letters, 1.16.59-1.16.62 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

24. Livy, History, None (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

25. Persius, Satires, 2.8 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

26. Persius, Saturae, 2.8 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

27. Quintilian, Institutes of Oratory, 1.6.39-1.6.40 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

1.6.39. Archaic words not only enjoy the patronage of distinguished authors, but also give style a certain majesty and charm. For they have the authority of age behind them, and for the very reason that they have fallen into desuetude, produce an attractive effect not unlike that of novelty. 1.6.40.  But such words must be used sparingly and must not thrust themselves upon our notice, since there is nothing more tiresome than affectation, nor above all must they be drawn from remote and forgotten ages: I refer to words such as topper, "quite," antegerio, "exceedingly," exanclare, "to exhaust," prosapia, "a race" and the language of the Salian Hymns now scarcely understood by its own priests.
28. Statius, Thebais, 11.503 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

29. Suetonius, Nero, 34.4 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

30. Apuleius, The Golden Ass, 11.15.1 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

31. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 9.27.2, 9.30.12, 10.1.4-10.1.11 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

9.27.2. Most men consider Love to be the youngest of the gods and the son of Aphrodite. But Olen the Lycian, who composed the oldest Greek hymns, says in a hymn to Eileithyia that she was the mother of Love. Later than Olen, both Pamphos and Orpheus wrote hexameter verse, and composed poems on Love, in order that they might be among those sung by the Lycomidae to accompany the ritual. I read them after conversation with a Torchbearer. of these things I will make no further mention. Hesiod, Hes. Th. 116 foll. or he who wrote the Theogony fathered on Hesiod, writes, I know, that Chaos was born first, and after Chaos, Earth, Tartarus and Love. 9.30.12. Whoever has devoted himself to the study of poetry knows that the hymns of Orpheus are all very short, and that the total number of them is not great. The Lycomidae know them and chant them over the ritual of the mysteries. For poetic beauty they may be said to come next to the hymns of Homer, while they have been even more honored by the gods. 10.1.4. The Thessalians, more enraged than ever against the Phocians, gathered levies from all their cities and marched out against them. Whereupon the Phocians, greatly terrified at the army of the Thessalians, especially at the number of their cavalry and the practised discipline of both mounts and riders, despatched a mission to Delphi, praying the god that they might escape the danger that threatened them. The oracle given them was this:— I will match in fight mortal and immortal, And to both will I give victory, but more to the mortal. 10.1.5. On receiving this oracle, the Phocians sent three hundred picked men with Gelon in command to make an attack on the enemy. The night was just falling, and the orders given were to reconnoiter without being observed, to return to the main body by the least known route, and to remain strictly on the defensive. These picked men along with their leader Gelon, trampled on by horses and butchered by their enemies, perished to a man at the hands of the Thessalians. 10.1.6. Their disaster created such panic among the Phocians in the camp that they actually gathered together in one spot their women, children, movable property, and also their clothes, gold, silver and images of the gods, and making a vast pyre they left in charge a force of thirty men. 10.1.7. These were under orders that, should the Phocians chance to be worsted in the battle, they were first to put to death the women and the children, then to lay them like victims with the valuables on the pyre, and finally to set it alight and perish themselves, either by each other's hands or by charging the cavalry of the Thessalians. Hence all forlorn hopes are called by the Greeks “Phocian despair.” On this occasion the Phocians forthwith proceeded to attack the Thessalians. 10.1.8. The commander of their cavalry was Daiphantes of Hyampolis, of their infantry Rhoeus of Ambrossus. But the office of commander-in-chief was held by Tellias, a seer of Elis, upon whom rested all the Phocians' hopes of salvation. 10.1.9. When the battle joined, the Phocians had before their eyes what they had resolved to do to their women and children, and seeing that their own salvation trembled in the balance, they dared the most desperate deeds, and, with the favour of heaven, achieved the most famous victory of that time. 10.1.10. Then did all Greece understand the oracle given to the Phocians by Apollo. For the watchword given in battle on every occasion by the Thessalian generals was Itonian Athena, and by the Phocian generals Phocus, from whom the Phocians were named. Because of this engagement the Phocians sent as offerings to Delphi statues of Apollo, of Tellias the seer, and of all their other generals in the battle, together with images of their local heroes. The figures were the work of the Argive Aristomedon. 10.1.11. Afterwards the Phocians discovered a stratagem quite as clever as their former ones. For when the armies were lying opposite each other at the pass into Phocis, five hundred picked men of Phocis, waiting until the moon was full, attacked the Thessalians on that night, first smearing themselves with chalk and, in addition to the chalk, putting on white armour. It is said that there then occurred a wholesale slaughter of the Thessalians, who thought this apparition of the night to be too unearthly to be an attack of their enemies. It was Tellias of Elis who devised this stratagem also for the Phocians to use against the Thessalians.
32. Origen, Against Celsus, 3.59 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

3.59. Immediately after this, Celsus, perceiving that he has slandered us with too great bitterness, as if by way of defense expresses himself as follows: That I bring no heavier charge than what the truth compels me, any one may see from the following remarks. Those who invite to participation in other mysteries, make proclamation as follows: 'Every one who has clean hands, and a prudent tongue;' others again thus: 'He who is pure from all pollution, and whose soul is conscious of no evil, and who has lived well and justly.' Such is the proclamation made by those who promise purification from sins. But let us hear what kind of persons these Christians invite. Every one, they say, who is a sinner, who is devoid of understanding, who is a child, and, to speak generally, whoever is unfortunate, him will the kingdom of God receive. Do you not call him a sinner, then, who is unjust, and a thief, and a housebreaker, and a poisoner, and a committer of sacrilege, and a robber of the dead? What others would a man invite if he were issuing a proclamation for an assembly of robbers? Now, in answer to such statements, we say that it is not the same thing to invite those who are sick in soul to be cured, and those who are in health to the knowledge and study of divine things. We, however, keeping both these things in view, at first invite all men to be healed, and exhort those who are sinners to come to the consideration of the doctrines which teach men not to sin, and those who are devoid of understanding to those which beget wisdom, and those who are children to rise in their thoughts to manhood, and those who are simply unfortunate to good fortune, or - which is the more appropriate term to use - to blessedness. And when those who have been turned towards virtue have made progress, and have shown that they have been purified by the word, and have led as far as they can a better life, then and not before do we invite them to participation in our mysteries. For we speak wisdom among them that are perfect.
33. Porphyry, On The Cave of The Nymphs, 15 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

15. One particular, however, remains to be explained, and that is the symbol of the olive planted at the top of the cavern, since Homer appears to indicate something very admirable by giving it such a position. For he does not merely say that an olive grows in this place, but that it flourishes on the summit of the cavern. "High at the head a branching olive grows, Beneath, a gloomy grotto s cool recess.." But the growth of the olive in such a situation is not fortuitous, as some one may suspect, but contains the enigma of the cavern. For |37 since the world was not produced rashly and casually, but is the work of divine wisdom and an intellectual nature; hence an olive, the symbol of this wisdom flourishes near the present cavern, which is an image of the world. For the olive is the plant of Minerva, and Minerva is wisdom. But this Goddess being produced from the head of Jupiter, the theologist has discovered an appropriate place for the olive by consecrating it at the summit of the port; signifying by this that the universe is not the effect of a casual event and the work of irrational fortune, but that it is the offspring of an intellectual nature and divine wisdom, which is separated indeed from it (by a difference of essence), but yet is near to it, through being established on the summit of the whole port (i.e., from the dignity and excellence of its nature governing the whole with consummate wisdom). Since, however, an olive is ever-flourishing, it possesses a certain peculiarity in the highest degree adapted to the revolutions of souls in the world, for to such souls this cave (as we have said) is sacred. For in summer the white leaves of the olive tend upwards, but in winter the whiter leaves are bent downward. On |38 this account also in prayers and supplications, men extend the branches of an olive, ominating from this that they shall exchange the sorrowful darkness of danger for the fair light of security and peace. The olive, therefore being naturally ever-flourishing, bears fruit which is the auxiliary of labour (by being its reward, it is sacred to Minerva; supplies the victors in athletic labours with crowns and affords a friendly branch to the suppliant petitioner. Thus, too, the world is governed by an intellectual nature, and is conducted by a wisdom eternal and ever-flourishing; by which the rewards of victory are conferred on the conquerors in the athletic race of life, as the reward of severe toil and patient perseverance. And the Demiurgus who connects and contains the world (in ineffable comprehensions) invigorates miserable and suppliant souls.
34. Nonnus, Dionysiaca, 6.169-6.173 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

35. Aeschines, Or., 2.153, 3.137, 3.207

36. Epigraphy, Lsam, 48

37. Orphic Hymns., Fragments, 306, 36, 474, 576-577, 654, 1



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aeschines Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 166; Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 213
agave Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 166
agersikybelis Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 62
agoracritus Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 62
amphissa Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 96
antiphon, anti-rhetoric Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 213
antithesis Seaford, Tragedy, Ritual and Money in Ancient Greece: Selected Essays (2018) 115
archimystes Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 166
archives Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 62
arguments, religious, religious significance of Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 209
asclepius de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 277
asebia (impiety), demosthenes avoiding notion Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 209
athens Papaioannou et al., Rhetoric and Religion in Ancient Greece and Rome (2021) 137; Papaioannou, Serafim and Demetriou, Rhetoric and Religion in Ancient Greece and Rome (2021) 137
athens and athenians, and drama Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 62
athens and athenians, and religious authority Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 62
athens and athenians, cults and cult places of Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 62
athens and athenians, in peloponnesian war era Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 62
atonement Blidstein, Purity Community and Ritual in Early Christian Literature (2017) 30
autonoe Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 166
bacchants, bacchae, bacchai Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 166
bacchic de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 114
bacchoi deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 29
bacchus, bacchius Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 166
bacchus de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 114
barathron Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 62
baubo bacchant Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 166
birth Blidstein, Purity Community and Ritual in Early Christian Literature (2017) 30
bowie, a. Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 213
burkert, w. Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 213
callias son of hipponicus (younger) Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 62
cerri, giovanni Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 62
citharōdoi Papaioannou et al., Rhetoric and Religion in Ancient Greece and Rome (2021) 137; Papaioannou, Serafim and Demetriou, Rhetoric and Religion in Ancient Greece and Rome (2021) 137
clara vox Papaioannou et al., Rhetoric and Religion in Ancient Greece and Rome (2021) 137; Papaioannou, Serafim and Demetriou, Rhetoric and Religion in Ancient Greece and Rome (2021) 137
comedy, comic technique Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 112
council house, of athens Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 62
cratinus Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 62
cult, cultic acts for specific cults, the corresponding god or place Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 166
cults, mysteries Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 104, 105, 112
daidouchos Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 62
daimon Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 96
dance, dancing, ecstatic, frenzied, maenadic, orgiastic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 166
death, impurity of Blidstein, Purity Community and Ritual in Early Christian Literature (2017) 30
death associated with dionysos and dionysian cult or myth Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 166
deception, and sophistry Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 213
deception, association with rhetoric Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 213
deinotes legein (cleverness at speaking) Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 213
demeter Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 62
democracy, athenian, and noble lies, and its oratory Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 213
demosthenes, attacks aeschines as sophist Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 213
demosthenes, representation of deceit Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 213
demosthenes, works, on the crown Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 213
demosthenes Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 213
dionysos Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 166; Horster and Klöckner, Cult Personnel in Asia Minor and the Aegean Islands from the Hellenistic to the Imperial Period (2014) 15
dionysus, mirror de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 119
dismemberment Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 166
ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 166
egypt/egyptian de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 119
eleusinian, orpheus, orphic, samothracian de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 119
etymologies deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 360
external vs. internal Blidstein, Purity Community and Ritual in Early Christian Literature (2017) 30
families, aeschines Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 104, 105
feminine Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 166
fire de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 114
foreigners Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 104
foucart, paul Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 62
fumigation Blidstein, Purity Community and Ritual in Early Christian Literature (2017) 30
gods, goodwill Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 209
goes / goeteia deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 360
goeteia (wizardry) Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 213
gold leaves / gold tablets deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 29
gorgias, and magic Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 213
guarducci, margherita ix gurôb papyrus Graf and Johnston, Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets (2007) 182
gypsum de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 114, 119
heart purity and impurity of Blidstein, Purity Community and Ritual in Early Christian Literature (2017) 30
hellenistic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 166
hera de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 119
heracleia Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 209
hieroi logoi Graf and Johnston, Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets (2007) 182
identity de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 114
initiates de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 114
initiation Blidstein, Purity Community and Ritual in Early Christian Literature (2017) 30
initiators deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 360
ino Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 166
invective, standard part of speech Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 104
isocrates Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 213
kadmos, kadmeian Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 166
katabasis, orphic Graf and Johnston, Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets (2007) 182
kosko, hillock Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 166
kybebe Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 62
kybebos Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 62
kybele Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 62
lampon Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 62
lightning de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 114
logography (speech-writing) Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 213
maenads, maenadic, maenadism, rites/cults Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 166
maenads, maenadic, maenadism Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 166
magic deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 360
magnesia, magnesian Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 166
male Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 166
manuscripts de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 277
masculine Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 166
metragyrtes Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 62
metroön, at athens Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 62
miaros (pollution, impurity), demosthenes Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 96
midias Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 209
minyads, daughters of minyas psoloeis Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 166
mirror de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 119
mithras Blidstein, Purity Community and Ritual in Early Christian Literature (2017) 30
mother of the gods, and athens Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 62
mother of the gods, in attic drama Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 62
mother of the gods, rites of Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 62
mother of the gods, scholarship on Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 62
mother of the gods, statues and images of Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 62
mountains Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 166
musaeus deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 29
mysteries, eleusinian Graf and Johnston, Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets (2007) 182
mystery cult, dionysiac Seaford, Tragedy, Ritual and Money in Ancient Greece: Selected Essays (2018) 115
mystery cult, of attis Seaford, Tragedy, Ritual and Money in Ancient Greece: Selected Essays (2018) 115
mystery cults Blidstein, Purity Community and Ritual in Early Christian Literature (2017) 30
mystic initiation, language of Seaford, Tragedy, Ritual and Money in Ancient Greece: Selected Essays (2018) 115
myth, mythical Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 166
myth de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 114, 119
negotiability, and anti-rhetorical terms Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 213
nilsson, martin Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 62
nurse de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 277
oaths, sacred Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 209
oedipus Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 62
oenotropoe Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 166
oracle, oracular Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 166
oracles Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 209
orphic, see mystery cults de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 277
orphic, see titans, zagreus de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 114, 119
orphics deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 29
parnassus de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 119
peloponnesian war Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 62
pentheus Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 166
peripatetic Blidstein, Purity Community and Ritual in Early Christian Literature (2017) 30
persia and persians, customs of Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 62
phocidians de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 119
plato, and magic Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 213
plato / (neo-)platonism deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 29
popular beliefs Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 96
prayer Papaioannou et al., Rhetoric and Religion in Ancient Greece and Rome (2021) 137; Papaioannou, Serafim and Demetriou, Rhetoric and Religion in Ancient Greece and Rome (2021) 137
preparatory purification Blidstein, Purity Community and Ritual in Early Christian Literature (2017) 30
priests, of mystery cults Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 112
priests, priestess de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 114, 277
proetids, daughters of proetus Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 166
ptolemies deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 29
punishment de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 114
pythagoras / (neo-)pythagoreanism deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 29
religion, lending seriousness Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 209
religion, marginal status Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 104
rhetoric, of anti-rhetoric Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 213
rite, ritual, maenadic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 166
rite, ritual Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 166
rites, ritual de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 114, 119, 277
rites deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 29
sabazios Horster and Klöckner, Cult Personnel in Asia Minor and the Aegean Islands from the Hellenistic to the Imperial Period (2014) 15
sanctuary de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 277
satzparallelismus Seaford, Tragedy, Ritual and Money in Ancient Greece: Selected Essays (2018) 115
self-control Blidstein, Purity Community and Ritual in Early Christian Literature (2017) 30
semele Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 166
sophistry, accusations of Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 213
sophistry, vignettes of Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 213
speech, purity of Blidstein, Purity Community and Ritual in Early Christian Literature (2017) 30
speech de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 114, 119
spin and spin-doctors Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 213
superstition de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 277
symposium Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 166
tabarnis Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 166
teiresias Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 166
telete deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 29, 360
theater, theatrical Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 166
thebes, theban Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 166
thessalians de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 119
thettale Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 166
thiasos θίασος Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 166
thought, purity of Blidstein, Purity Community and Ritual in Early Christian Literature (2017) 30
thrace and thracians Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 62
titans, crime de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 114
titans, myth de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 114, 119
titans, plaster de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 114, 119
toumba Horster and Klöckner, Cult Personnel in Asia Minor and the Aegean Islands from the Hellenistic to the Imperial Period (2014) 15
toys Graf and Johnston, Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets (2007) 182
tyche (fortune), aeschines Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 104, 105
tyche (fortune), demosthenes Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 96
tyrannus Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 62
washing Blidstein, Purity Community and Ritual in Early Christian Literature (2017) 30
wine, wine-god de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 114
woman Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 166
worship Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 166
worshippers' Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 166
zeus, of dodona Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 96
zeus, zeus katabates Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 166
zeus, zeus lightning de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 114
zeus Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 166; de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 114; deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 360
zeus phemios Horster and Klöckner, Cult Personnel in Asia Minor and the Aegean Islands from the Hellenistic to the Imperial Period (2014) 15