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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



4413
Demosthenes, Orations, 18.102


nanI will now return to my next ensuing public actions; consider them once again in relation to the best interests of the commonwealth. Observing that the navy was going to pieces, that the wealthy were let off with trifling contributions, while citizens of moderate or small means were losing all they had, and that as a result the government was missing its opportunities, I made a statute under which I compelled the wealthy to take their fair share of expense, stopped the oppression of the poor, and, by a measure of great public benefit, caused your naval preparations to be made in good time.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

13 results
1. Isaeus, Orations, 4.27, 6.60-6.61, 7.40 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

2. Isocrates, Orations, 8.128, 12.145, 15.160 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

3. Lysias, Orations, 7.31-7.32, 18.3, 19.9, 19.29, 19.57-19.59, 21.1-21.3, 21.5-21.7, 21.11-21.12, 26.22, 28.3, 29.4, 30.26 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

4. Xenophon, Hellenica, 6.2.1 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

6.2.1. The Lacedaemonians, then, and their allies were gathering together in Phocis, and the Thebans had withdrawn to their own country and were guarding the passes. As for the Athenians, since they saw that the Thebans were growing in power through their help and still were not contributing money for their fleet, while they were themselves being worn out by extraordinary taxes, by plundering expeditions from Aegina, and by guarding their territory, 374 B.C. they conceived a desire to cease from the war, and sending ambassadors to Lacedaemon, concluded peace.
5. Xenophon, On Household Management, 2.6 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

2.6. Moreover, I observe that already the state is exacting heavy contributions from you: you must needs keep horses, pay for choruses and gymnastic competitions, and accept presidencies; It is unlikely that προστατείας is used here for προστασίας, the charge of resident aliens, since there is no proof that this duty involved expense to the patron. and if war breaks out, I know they will require you to maintain a ship and pay taxes that will nearly crush you. Whenever you seem to fall short of what is expected of you, the Athenians will certainly punish you as though they had caught you robbing them.
6. Xenophon, Constitution of The Athenians, 1.13 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

7. Xenophon, Symposium, 4.30-4.32 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

4.30. Now, as for my situation in our commonwealth, when I was rich, I was, to begin with, in dread of some one’s digging through the wall of my house and not only getting my money but also doing me a mischief personally; in the next place, I knuckled down to the blackmailers, knowing well enough that my abilities lay more in the direction of suffering injury than of inflicting it on them. Then, too, I was for ever being ordered by the government to undergo some expenditure or other, and I never had the opportunity for foreign travel. 4.31. Now, however, since I am stripped of my property over the border and get no income from the property in Attica , and my household effects have been sold, I stretch out and enjoy a sound sleep, I have gained the confidence of the state, I am no longer subjected to threats but do the threatening now myself; and I have the free man’s privilege of going abroad or staying here at home as I please. People now actually rise from their seats in deference to me, and rich men obsequiously give me the right of way on the street. Charmides is apparently drawing the picture of the independent voter or member of a jury. 4.32. Now I am like a despot; then I was clearly a slave. Then I paid a revenue to the body politic; now I live on the tribute The poor relief. that the state pays to me. Moreover, people used to vilify me, when I was wealthy, for consorting with Socrates ; but now that I have got poor, no one bothers his head about it any longer. Again, when my property was large, either the government or fate was continually making me throw some of it to the winds; but now, far from throwing anything away (for I possess nothing), I am always in expectation of acquiring something.
8. Aeschines, Letters, 3.178-3.179 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

9. Demosthenes, Orations, 1.8-1.9, 18.79, 18.83, 18.88, 18.112-18.113, 18.117, 18.119, 18.257, 18.299, 18.303, 18.311-18.312, 18.316, 20.121-20.122, 21.61, 24.197-24.198, 28.17, 38.26, 47.54, 50.8-50.9, 52.26 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

10. Diodorus Siculus, Historical Library, 13.47.7 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

13.47.7.  And since he wished to relieve both the citizens and the allies from their contributions, he laid waste the territory of the enemy and collected great quantities of booty. He visited also the allied cities and exacted money of such inhabitants as were advocating a change in government.
11. Strabo, Geography, 9.1.19 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

9.1.19. The greater men's fondness for learning about things that are famous and the greater the number of men who have talked about them, the greater the censure, if one is not master of the historical facts. For example, in his Collection of the Rivers, Callimachus says that it makes him laugh if anyone makes bold to write that the Athenian virgins draw pure liquid from the Eridanus, from which even cattle would hold aloof. Its sources are indeed existent now, with pure and potable water, as they say, outside the Gates of Diochares, as they are called, near the Lyceium; but in earlier times there was also a fountain near by which was constructed by man, with abundant and excellent water; and even if the water is not so now, why should it be a thing to wonder at, if in early times the water was abundant and pure, and therefore also potable, but in later times underwent a change? However, it is not permitted me to linger over details, since they are so numerous, nor yet, on the other hand, to pass by them all in silence without even mentioning one or another of them in a summary way.
12. Plutarch, Moralia, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

13. Aeschines, Or., 3.178-3.179



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aeschines Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 242
altar, altars, of apollo (athens, agora) Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 247
benefactions, notion of Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 247
charis Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 201
class struggle Liddel, Decrees of Fourth-Century Athens (403/2-322/1 BC): Volume 2, Political and Cultural Perspectives (2020) 57
crowns Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 242
deinias, athenian benefactor in the time of lycurgus Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 247
demes, athenian Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 247
demosthenes, orator Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 242, 247
donations, private Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 247
ecclesia Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 242
eisphora Gygax and Zuiderhoek, Benefactors and the Polis: The Public Gift in the Greek Cities from the Homeric World to Late Antiquity (2021) 88
eisphorai Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 247
euergetism, and symbolic capital Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 247
honors, controversy surrounding Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 242
land Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 247
leadership, as benefaction Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 242
leadership Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 242
liability, political' Liddel, Decrees of Fourth-Century Athens (403/2-322/1 BC): Volume 2, Political and Cultural Perspectives (2020) 57
liturgical class Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 201
liturgies, and symbolic capital Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 247
liturgies, avoidance of Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 201
liturgies, controversy surrounding Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 201
liturgies, in fourth-century athens Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 247
liturgies, opposition to Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 201
liturgies, voluntary Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 247
liturgies Gygax and Zuiderhoek, Benefactors and the Polis: The Public Gift in the Greek Cities from the Homeric World to Late Antiquity (2021) 88
loans Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 201
lyceum Gygax and Zuiderhoek, Benefactors and the Polis: The Public Gift in the Greek Cities from the Homeric World to Late Antiquity (2021) 88
megistai timai Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 242
military commanders, honors for Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 242
money, for liturgies Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 201
neoptolemus, son of anticles Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 247
old oligarch Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 201
panathenaic stadium Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 247
peloponnesian war Gygax and Zuiderhoek, Benefactors and the Polis: The Public Gift in the Greek Cities from the Homeric World to Late Antiquity (2021) 88; Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 201
phratriai Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 247
phylai Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 247
proeisphorai Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 201
prytaneion Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 242
public discourse, on liturgies Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 247
reciprocity, generalized/indirect Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 247
rich, the Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 201, 242, 247
sitêsis Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 242
symmoriai Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 201, 247
theôrikon Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 242
walls Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 242