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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



2442
Clement Of Alexandria, Miscellanies, 3.3.12
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

12 results
1. Heraclitus of Ephesus, Fragments, 62 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

2. Empedocles, Fragments, 118 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

3. Plato, Phaedo, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

114c. they mount upward into their pure abode and dwell upon the earth. And of these, all who have duly purified themselves by philosophy live henceforth altogether without bodies, and pass to still more beautiful abodes which it is not easy to describe, nor have we now time enough.But, Simmias, because of all these things which we have recounted we ought to do our best to acquire virtue and wisdom in life. For the prize is fair and the hope great.
4. Plato, Statesman, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

273b. over itself and all within itself, and remembering and practising the teachings of the Creator and Father to the extent of its power, at first more accurately and at last more carelessly; and the reason for this was the material element in its composition, because this element, which was inherent in the primeval nature, was infected with great disorder before the attainment of the existing orderly universe. For from its Composer the universe has received only good things; but from its previous condition it retains in itself and creates in the animals all the elements of harshness and injustice
5. Plato, Republic, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

588b. let us take up again the statement with which we began and that has brought us to this pass. It was, I believe, averred that injustice is profitable to the completely unjust man who is reputed just. Was not that the proposition? Yes, that. Let us, then, reason with its proponent now that we have agreed on the essential nature of injustice and just conduct. How? he said. By fashioning in our discourse a symbolic image of the soul, that the maintainer of that proposition may see precisely what it is that he was saying.
6. New Testament, Hebrews, 13.11 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

13.11. For the bodies of those animals, whose blood is brought into the holy place by the high priest as an offering for sin, are burned outside of the camp.
7. New Testament, Romans, 7.18, 8.7-8.30 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

7.18. For I know that in me, that is, in my flesh, dwells no good thing. For desire is present with me, but I don't find it doing that which is good. 8.7. because the mind of the flesh is hostile towards God; for it is not subject to God's law, neither indeed can it be. 8.8. Those who are in the flesh can't please God. 8.9. But you are not in the flesh but in the Spirit, if it is so that the Spirit of God dwells in you. But if any man doesn't have the Spirit of Christ, he is not his. 8.10. If Christ is in you, the body is dead because of sin, but the spirit is alive because of righteousness. 8.11. But if the Spirit of him who raised up Jesus from the dead dwells in you, he who raised up Christ Jesus from the dead will also give life to your mortal bodies through his Spirit who dwells in you. 8.12. So then, brothers, we are debtors, not to the flesh, to live after the flesh. 8.13. For if you live after the flesh, you must die; but if by the Spirit you put to death the deeds of the body, you will live. 8.14. For as many as are led by the Spirit of God, these are children of God. 8.15. For you didn't receive the spirit of bondage again to fear, but you received the Spirit of adoption, by whom we cry, "Abba! Father! 8.16. The Spirit himself testifies with our spirit that we are children of God; 8.17. and if children, then heirs; heirs of God, and joint-heirs with Christ; if indeed we suffer with him, that we may also be glorified with him. 8.18. For I consider that the sufferings of this present time are not worthy to be compared with the glory which will be revealed toward us. 8.19. For the creation waits with eager expectation for the sons of God to be revealed. 8.20. For the creation was subjected to vanity, not of its own will, but because of him who subjected it, in hope 8.21. that the creation itself also will be delivered from the bondage of decay into the liberty of the glory of the children of God. 8.22. For we know that the whole creation groans and travails in pain together until now. 8.23. Not only so, but ourselves also, who have the first fruits of the Spirit, even we ourselves groan within ourselves, waiting for adoption, the redemption of our body. 8.24. For we were saved in hope, but hope that is seen is not hope. For who hopes for that which he sees? 8.25. But if we hope for that which we don't see, we wait for it with patience. 8.26. In the same way, the Spirit also helps our weaknesses, for we don't know how to pray as we ought. But the Spirit himself makes intercession for us with groanings which can't be uttered. 8.27. He who searches the hearts knows what is on the Spirit's mind, because he makes intercession for the saints according to God. 8.28. We know that all things work together for good for those who love God, to those who are called according to his purpose. 8.29. For whom he foreknew, he also predestined to be conformed to the image of his Son, that he might be the firstborn among many brothers. 8.30. Whom he predestined, those he also called. Whom he called, those he also justified. Whom he justified, those he also glorified.
8. Clement of Alexandria, Miscellanies, 3.3.13-3.3.21, 3.3.24, 3.11.76, 3.14.95 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

9. Hippolytus, Refutation of All Heresies, 5.20.4 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

10. Origen, Against Celsus, 7.50 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

7.50. Celsus has not explained how error accompanies the becoming, or product of generation; nor has he expressed himself with sufficient clearness to enable us to compare his ideas with ours, and to pass judgment on them. But the prophets, who have given some wise suggestions on the subject of things produced by generation, tell us that a sacrifice for sin was offered even for new-born infants, as not being free from sin. They say, I was shapen in iniquity, and in sin did my mother conceive me; also, They are estranged from the womb; which is followed by the singular expression, They go astray as soon as they are born, speaking lies. Besides, our wise men have such a contempt for all sensible objects, that sometimes they speak of all material things as vanity: thus, For the creature was made subject to vanity, not willingly, but by reason of him that subjected the same in hope; at other times as vanity of vanities, Vanity of vanities, says the Preacher, all is vanity. Who has given so severe an estimate of the life of the human soul here on earth, as he who says: Verily every man at his best estate is altogether vanity? He does not hesitate at all as to the difference between the present life of the soul and that which it is to lead hereafter. He does not say, Who knows if to die is not to live, and if to live is not death But he boldly proclaims the truth, and says, Our soul is bowed down to the dust; and, You have brought me into the dust of death; and similarly, Who will deliver me from the body of this death? also, Who will change the body of our humiliation. It is a prophet also who says, You have brought us down in a place of affliction; meaning by the place of affliction this earthly region, to which Adam, that is to say, man, came after he was driven out of paradise for sin. Observe also how well the different life of the soul here and hereafter has been recognised by him who says, Now we see in a glass, obscurely, but then face to face; and, Whilst we are in our home in the body, we are away from our home in the Lord; wherefore we are well content to go from our home in the body, and to come to our home with the Lord.
11. Plotinus, Enneads, (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

12. Heraclitus Lesbius, Fragments, 62



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
antitheses, marcions Lieu, Marcion and the Making of a Heretic: God and Scripture in the Second Century (2015) 130
ascetic Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 584
asceticism Lieu, Marcion and the Making of a Heretic: God and Scripture in the Second Century (2015) 132
cave Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 584
clement of alexandria Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 584
empedocles deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 106
gnostic, gnosticism Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 584
gnostic/ gnosticism deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 106, 339
heraclitus deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 106
life, contempt for Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 584
life, daily, worldy Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 584
maker Lieu, Marcion and the Making of a Heretic: God and Scripture in the Second Century (2015) 129, 131
manichaeism deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 339
marcion, marcionites Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 584
marriage Lieu, Marcion and the Making of a Heretic: God and Scripture in the Second Century (2015) 131
matter (hyle) Lieu, Marcion and the Making of a Heretic: God and Scripture in the Second Century (2015) 131
original sin / primordial fault deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 339
paul Lieu, Marcion and the Making of a Heretic: God and Scripture in the Second Century (2015) 132
pelagianism deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 339
pharaoh Lieu, Marcion and the Making of a Heretic: God and Scripture in the Second Century (2015) 130
plato Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 584
plato / (neo-)platonism deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 106, 339
platonism Lieu, Marcion and the Making of a Heretic: God and Scripture in the Second Century (2015) 130, 131, 132
plotinus Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 584
principles Lieu, Marcion and the Making of a Heretic: God and Scripture in the Second Century (2015) 130
prison, cosmos as Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 584
proclus Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 584
procreation Lieu, Marcion and the Making of a Heretic: God and Scripture in the Second Century (2015) 130, 131
punishment Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 584
pythagoras / (neo-)pythagoreanism deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 106
pythagoreanism Lieu, Marcion and the Making of a Heretic: God and Scripture in the Second Century (2015) 131
sethians deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 106
soma-sema deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 339
soul, individual Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 584
soul Lieu, Marcion and the Making of a Heretic: God and Scripture in the Second Century (2015) 131
stranger Lieu, Marcion and the Making of a Heretic: God and Scripture in the Second Century (2015) 132
tertullian Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 584
theology Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 584
valentinus Lieu, Marcion and the Making of a Heretic: God and Scripture in the Second Century (2015) 129, 132
women' Lieu, Marcion and the Making of a Heretic: God and Scripture in the Second Century (2015) 131
zeus deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 106, 339