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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



2440
Clement Of Alexandria, Exhortation To The Greeks, 2.22.4
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

5 results
1. Euripides, Bacchae, 103-104, 1139-1143, 1194-1196, 697-698, 767-768, 102 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

102. στεφάνοις, ἔνθεν ἄγραν θηροτρόφον note resp=
2. Tibullus, Elegies, 1.7.48 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3. Apuleius, The Golden Ass, 6.2 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

4. Clement of Alexandria, Exhortation To The Greeks, 2.16.1 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

5. Origen, Against Celsus, 1.25 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

1.25. And perhaps there is a danger as great as that which degrades the name of God, or of the Good, to improper objects, in changing the name of God according to a secret system, and applying those which belong to inferior beings to greater, and vice versa. And I do not dwell on this, that when the name of Zeus is uttered, there is heard at the same time that of the son of Kronos and Rhea, and the husband of Hera, and brother of Poseidon, and father of Athene, and Artemis, who was guilty of incest with his own daughter Persephone; or that Apollo immediately suggests the son of Leto and Zeus, and the brother of Artemis, and half-brother of Hermes; and so with all the other names invented by these wise men of Celsus, who are the parents of these opinions, and the ancient theologians of the Greeks. For what are the grounds for deciding that he should on the one hand be properly called Zeus, and yet on the other should not have Kronos for his father and Rhea for his mother? And the same argument applies to all the others that are called gods. But this charge does not at all apply to those who, for some mysterious reason, refer the word Sabaoth, or Adonai, or any of the other names to the (true) God. And when one is able to philosophize about the mystery of names, he will find much to say respecting the titles of the angels of God, of whom one is called Michael, and another Gabriel, and another Raphael, appropriately to the duties which they discharge in the world, according to the will of the God of all things. And a similar philosophy of names applies also to our Jesus, whose name has already been seen, in an unmistakeable manner, to have expelled myriads of evil spirits from the souls and bodies (of men), so great was the power which it exerted upon those from whom the spirits were driven out. And while still upon the subject of names, we have to mention that those who are skilled in the use of incantations, relate that the utterance of the same incantation in its proper language can accomplish what the spell professes to do; but when translated into any other tongue, it is observed to become inefficacious and feeble. And thus it is not the things signified, but the qualities and peculiarities of words, which possess a certain power for this or that purpose. And so on such grounds as these we defend the conduct of the Christians, when they struggle even to death to avoid calling God by the name of Zeus, or to give Him a name from any other language. For they either use the common name - God - indefinitely, or with some such addition as that of the Maker of all things, the Creator of heaven and earth - He who sent down to the human race those good men, to whose names that of God being added, certain mighty works are wrought among men. And much more besides might be said on the subject of names, against those who think that we ought to be indifferent as to our use of them. And if the remark of Plato in the Philebus should surprise us, when he says, My fear, O Protagoras, about the names of the gods is no small one, seeing Philebus in his discussion with Socrates had called pleasure a god, how shall we not rather approve the piety of the Christians, who apply none of the names used in the mythologies to the Creator of the world? And now enough on this subject for the present.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
agave Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 335
anubis, embalmer of osiris Griffiths, The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI) (1975) 224
bacchants, bacchae, bacchai Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 335
chorus χορός, choral Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 335
chthonic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 335
crown, crowned Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 335
cult, cultic acts for specific cults, the corresponding god or place Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 335
death associated with dionysos and dionysian cult or myth Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 335
dionysos, awakening Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 335
dionysos, dionysos bassareus/bassaros Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 335
dionysos, epiphany Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 335
dionysos Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 335
eleusinian rites, influence of Griffiths, The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI) (1975) 224
female member, and cista Griffiths, The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI) (1975) 224
ivy, carried by initiate in vision Griffiths, The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI) (1975) 224
kadmos, kadmeian Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 335
kithairon Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 335
lion Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 335
maenads, maenadic, maenadism Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 335
mania μανία, maniacal Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 335
myth, mythical Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 335
nebris νεβρίς Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 335
orphism, orphic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 335
phallus, and cista Griffiths, The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI) (1975) 224
promise Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 335
rite, ritual Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 335
sabazios Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 335
serpents Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 335
snakes Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 335
sokar, effigy of' Griffiths, The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI) (1975) 224
thyrsus θύρσος Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 335
woman Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 335
worship Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 335
worshippers Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 335