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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



2439
Clement Of Alexandria, Christ The Educator, 3.8
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

5 results
1. Philo of Alexandria, On Drunkenness, 166, 169-170, 164 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

164. These are the offences of which Lot, the father of daughters, appears to me to be especially guilty, not being able to nourish a masculine and perfect plant in his soul; for he had two daughters by his wife, who was afterwards turned to stone, whom, using an appropriate appellation, one may call habit, a nature at variance with truth, and always, whenever any one tries to lead it on, lagging behind and looking round upon its ancient and customary ways, and remaining in the midst of them like a lifeless pillar.
2. Philo of Alexandria, On The Posterity of Cain, 177, 175 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

175. and the two daughters of Lot, the man who was subdued and overthrown by the weakness of the soul, namely, intention and agreement, desire to become pregt by the mind, that is to say, by their father, acting in opposition to him who said, "God has raised up for me ..." For that which the living God did for him, this they affirm that the mind is able to do for them, introducing the doctrine of an intoxicated and frenzied soul. It is indeed the act of sober reason, both to confess that God is the Creator and the Father of the universe; and the conduct of one utterly fallen in intoxication and drunkenness, to fancy that he himself is the bringer about of each of human affairs.
3. Philo of Alexandria, On The Life of Moses, 2.53, 2.55-2.58 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

2.53. on which account those men who have had unbounded prosperity bestowed upon them, and all things tending to the production of health of body, and riches, and glory, and all other external parts of good fortune, but who have rejected virtue, and have chosen crafty wickedness, and all others kinds of vice, not through compulsion, but of their own spontaneous free will, looking upon that which is the greatest of all evils as the greatest possible advantage, he looks upon as enemies not of mankind only, but of the entire heaven and world, and says that they are awaiting, not any ordinary punishments, but new and extraordinary ones, which that constant assessor of God, justice, who detests wickedness, invents and inflicts terribly upon them, turning against them the most powerful elements of the universe, water and fire, so that at appointed times some are destroyed by deluges, others are burnt with fire, and perish in that manner. 2.55. and when at a subsequent period the race of mankind had again increased from those who had been spared, and had become very numerous, since the succeeding generations did not take the calamities which had befallen their ancestors as a lesson to teach themselves wisdom and moderation, but turned to acts of intemperance and became studiers of evil practices, God determined to destroy them with fire. 2.56. Therefore on this occasion, as the holy scriptures tell us, thunderbolts fell from heaven, and burnt up those wicked men and their cities; and even to this day there are seen in Syria monuments of the unprecedented destruction that fell upon them, in the ruins, and ashes, and sulphur, and smoke, and dusky flame which still is sent up from the ground as of a fire smouldering beneath; 2.57. and in this way it came to pass that those wicked men were punished with the aforesaid chastisements, while those who were eminent for virtue and piety were well off, receiving rewards worthy of their virtue. 2.58. But when the whole of that district was thus burnt, inhabitants and all, by the impetuous rush of the heavenly fire, one single man in the country, a sojourner, was preserved by the providence of God because he had never shared in the transgressions of the natives, though sojourners in general were in the habit of adopting the customs of the foreign nations, among which they might be settled, for the sake of their own safety, since, if they despised them, they might be in danger from the inhabitants of the land. And yet this man had not attained to any perfection of wisdom, so as to be thought worthy of such an honour by reason of the perfect excellence of his nature; but he was spared only because he did not join the multitude who were inclined to luxury and effeminacy, and who pursued every kind of pleasure and indulged every kind of appetite, gratifying them abundantly, and inflaming them as one might inflame fire by heaping upon it plenty of rough fuel.
4. Philo of Alexandria, Questions On Genesis, 4.23, 4.25, 4.31, 4.42, 4.51-4.52, 4.55-4.57 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

5. Clement of Alexandria, Christ The Educator, 2.4, 2.7-2.11, 2.13, 3.4-3.5, 3.9-3.13 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
ascesis, ascetism Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 73
blessings, divine, benefactions Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 73
city, civic life context/religion Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 73
codes, family, sexuality, hair Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 73
desires, attitude towards Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 73
education, agonistic model Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 73
elite Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 73
family, household Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 73
happiness Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 73
homosexual behavior, as the sin of sodom Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 289
homosexual behavior, pederasty and Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 289
homosexual behavior, punishment of Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 289
homosexual behavior, reproduction and Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 289
lot, incest of Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 289
mind Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 73
musonius rufus Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 73
nature Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 73
pederasty Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 289
punishment, fitting the crime Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 289
reason, faculty Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 73
reproduction, sodomites disdain for and failure in Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 289
rhetoric Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 73
rome, empire Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 73
segor (tsoʿar) Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 289
self-care Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 73
self-image, gods image/humans Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 73
sin, homosexual behavior as Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 289
sodom, homosexual behavior and Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 289
sodom, homosexuality as sin of Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 289
sodom, literal and ethical interpretations of Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 289
sodom, philos influence concerning Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 289
sodom, segor escaping Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 289
sodom, sodomite cities, destruction of Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 289
sophists Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 73
stoicism, stoic views Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 73
telos Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 73
temperance Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 73
tranquility Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 73
virtue' Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 73