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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



2439
Clement Of Alexandria, Christ The Educator, 2.1.16.3
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

6 results
1. Hebrew Bible, Psalms, 23.1 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

23.1. מִזְמוֹר לְדָוִד יְהוָה רֹעִי לֹא אֶחְסָר׃ 23.1. A Psalm of David. The LORD is my shepherd; I shall not want."
2. New Testament, 1 Corinthians, 8.1, 8.7, 8.9-8.10, 9.4-9.5, 9.12, 9.17, 9.19, 9.25, 10.25-10.32 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

8.1. Now concerning things sacrificed to idols: We know that we allhave knowledge. Knowledge puffs up, but love builds up. 8.7. However, that knowledgeisn't in all men. But some, with consciousness of the idol until now,eat as of a thing sacrificed to an idol, and their conscience, beingweak, is defiled. 8.9. But be careful that by no means does this liberty ofyours become a stumbling block to the weak. 8.10. For if a man seesyou who have knowledge sitting in an idol's temple, won't hisconscience, if he is weak, be emboldened to eat things sacrificed toidols? 9.4. Have we no right to eat and to drink? 9.5. Have we noright to take along a wife who is a believer, even as the rest of theapostles, and the brothers of the Lord, and Cephas? 9.12. If others partake of this right overyou, don't we yet more? Nevertheless we did not use this right, but webear all things, that we may cause no hindrance to the gospel ofChrist. 9.17. For if I do this of my own will, Ihave a reward. But if not of my own will, I have a stewardshipentrusted to me. 9.19. For though I was free fromall, I brought myself under bondage to all, that I might gain the more. 9.25. Every man who strives in thegames exercises self-control in all things. Now they do it to receive acorruptible crown, but we an incorruptible. 10.25. Whatever is sold in the butcher shop, eat, asking no questionfor the sake of conscience 10.26. for "the earth is the Lord's, andits fullness. 10.27. But if one of those who don't believe invitesyou to a meal, and you are inclined to go, eat whatever is set beforeyou, asking no questions for the sake of conscience. 10.28. But ifanyone says to you, "This was offered to idols," don't eat it for thesake of the one who told you, and for the sake of conscience. For "theearth is the Lord's, and all its fullness. 10.29. Conscience, I say,not your own, but the other's conscience. For why is my liberty judgedby another conscience? 10.30. If I partake with thankfulness, why am Idenounced for that for which I give thanks? 10.31. Whether thereforeyou eat, or drink, or whatever you do, do all to the glory of God. 10.32. Give no occasions for stumbling, either to Jews, or to Greeks,or to the assembly of God;
3. New Testament, Acts, 15.25, 15.28-15.29 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

15.25. it seemed good to us, having come to one accord, to choose out men and send them to you with our beloved Barnabas and Paul 15.28. For it seemed good to the Holy Spirit, and to us, to lay no greater burden on you than these necessary things: 15.29. that you abstain from things sacrificed to idols, from blood, from things strangled, and from sexual immorality, from which if you keep yourselves, it will be well with you. Farewell.
4. Clement of Alexandria, Miscellanies, 7.6.33.6 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

5. Diogenes Laertius, Lives of The Philosophers, 4.40, 7.160-7.161 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

4.40. Once indeed, when at Athens, he stopped too long in the Piraeus, discussing themes, out of friendship for Hierocles, and for this he was censured by certain persons. He was very lavish, in short another Aristippus, and he was fond of dining well, but only with those who shared his tastes. He lived openly with Theodete and Phila, the Elean courtesans, and to those who censured him he quoted the maxims of Aristippus. He was also fond of boys and very susceptible. Hence he was accused by Ariston of Chios, the Stoic, and his followers, who called him a corrupter of youth and a shameless teacher of immorality. 7.160. 2. ARISTONAriston the Bald, of Chios, who was also called the Siren, declared the end of action to be a life of perfect indifference to everything which is neither virtue nor vice; recognizing no distinction whatever in things indifferent, but treating them all alike. The wise man he compared to a good actor, who, if called upon to take the part of a Thersites or of an Agamemnon, will impersonate them both becomingly. He wished to discard both Logic and Physics, saying that Physics was beyond our reach and Logic did not concern us: all that did concern us was Ethics. 7.161. Dialectical reasonings, he said, are like spiders' webs, which, though they seem to display some artistic workmanship, are yet of no use. He would not admit a plurality of virtues with Zeno, nor again with the Megarians one single virtue called by many names; but he treated virtue in accordance with the category of relative modes. Teaching this sort of philosophy, and lecturing in the Cynosarges, he acquired such influence as to be called the founder of a sect. At any rate Miltiades and Diphilus were denominated Aristoneans. He was a plausible speaker and suited the taste of the general public. Hence Timon's verse about him:One who from wily Ariston's line boasts his descent.
6. Iamblichus, Life of Pythagoras, 24.107-24.108 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
abstinence Wilson, The Sentences of Sextus (2012) 146
agapē Černušková, Kovacs and Plátová, Clement’s Biblical Exegesis: Proceedings of the Second Colloquium on Clement of Alexandria (2016) 186
allēgoria, interpretation Černušková, Kovacs and Plátová, Clement’s Biblical Exegesis: Proceedings of the Second Colloquium on Clement of Alexandria (2016) 186
animals Wilson, The Sentences of Sextus (2012) 146
apollonius of tyana Wilson, The Sentences of Sextus (2012) 146
assimilation Wilson, The Sentences of Sextus (2012) 146
clement of alexandria, assimilation of heresy to paganism Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 323
defilement Wilson, The Sentences of Sextus (2012) 146
desires Wilson, The Sentences of Sextus (2012) 146
diet Wilson, The Sentences of Sextus (2012) 146
exegesis Černušková, Kovacs and Plátová, Clement’s Biblical Exegesis: Proceedings of the Second Colloquium on Clement of Alexandria (2016) 186
fleshly texture Černušková, Kovacs and Plátová, Clement’s Biblical Exegesis: Proceedings of the Second Colloquium on Clement of Alexandria (2016) 186
food Wilson, The Sentences of Sextus (2012) 146
gnosticism, orthodox criticism of morality of Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 323
holiness Wilson, The Sentences of Sextus (2012) 146
impurity Wilson, The Sentences of Sextus (2012) 146
libertinism/license Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 323
logos-theology Černušková, Kovacs and Plátová, Clement’s Biblical Exegesis: Proceedings of the Second Colloquium on Clement of Alexandria (2016) 186
love Černušková, Kovacs and Plátová, Clement’s Biblical Exegesis: Proceedings of the Second Colloquium on Clement of Alexandria (2016) 186
marriage Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 323
paganism, heresy assimilated to Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 323
pedagogue Černušková, Kovacs and Plátová, Clement’s Biblical Exegesis: Proceedings of the Second Colloquium on Clement of Alexandria (2016) 186
philosophy, positive invocation and use of Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 323
power Wilson, The Sentences of Sextus (2012) 146
pythagoras Wilson, The Sentences of Sextus (2012) 146
pythagoreanism Wilson, The Sentences of Sextus (2012) 146
sex Wilson, The Sentences of Sextus (2012) 146
stoicism, orthodox borrowing from Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 323
teachers Wilson, The Sentences of Sextus (2012) 146
the body Wilson, The Sentences of Sextus (2012) 146
the mind Wilson, The Sentences of Sextus (2012) 146
the soul Wilson, The Sentences of Sextus (2012) 146
vegetarianism Wilson, The Sentences of Sextus (2012) 146
virtue' Wilson, The Sentences of Sextus (2012) 146
wisdom) Černušková, Kovacs and Plátová, Clement’s Biblical Exegesis: Proceedings of the Second Colloquium on Clement of Alexandria (2016) 186
wisdom literature Černušková, Kovacs and Plátová, Clement’s Biblical Exegesis: Proceedings of the Second Colloquium on Clement of Alexandria (2016) 186
words, solomon (i.e. proverbs) Černušková, Kovacs and Plátová, Clement’s Biblical Exegesis: Proceedings of the Second Colloquium on Clement of Alexandria (2016) 186
πορνεία Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 323
ἀδιαφορία Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 323
ἀδιαφόρως Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 323