Home About Network of subjects Linked subjects heatmap Book indices included Search by subject Search by reference Browse subjects Browse texts

Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



2385
Cicero, Tusculan Disputations, 5.95-5.96
NaN
NaN


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

5 results
1. Cicero, On Laws, 1.39 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2. Cicero, Tusculan Disputations, 5.96 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

5.96. quocirca corpus gaudere tam diu, dum praesentem sentiret voluptatem, animum et praesentem percipere pariter cum corpore et prospicere venientem nec praeteritam praeterfluere sinere. ita perpetuas et contextas contestas ex contentas K c voluptates in sapiente fore semper, cum expectatio expectatione G 1 speratarum voluptatum cum cum add. Lb. perceptarum memoria iungeretur.
3. Catullus, Poems, 76 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4. Lucretius Carus, On The Nature of Things, 2.1-2.61, 6.1-6.28 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

5. Diogenes Laertius, Lives of The Philosophers, 2.89, 2.91, 10.127 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

2.89. The removal of pain, however, which is put forward in Epicurus, seems to them not to be pleasure at all, any more than the absence of pleasure is pain. For both pleasure and pain they hold to consist in motion, whereas absence of pleasure like absence of pain is not motion, since painlessness is the condition of one who is, as it were, asleep. They assert that some people may fail to choose pleasure because their minds are perverted; not all mental pleasures and pains, however, are derived from bodily counterparts. For instance, we take disinterested delight in the prosperity of our country which is as real as our delight in our own prosperity. Nor again do they admit that pleasure is derived from the memory or expectation of good, which was a doctrine of Epicurus. 2.91. They do not accept the doctrine that every wise man lives pleasantly and every fool painfully, but regard it as true for the most part only. It is sufficient even if we enjoy but each single pleasure as it comes. They say that prudence is a good, though desirable not in itself but on account of its consequences; that we make friends from interested motives, just as we cherish any part of the body so long as we have it; that some of the virtues are found even in the foolish; that bodily training contributes to the acquisition of virtue; that the sage will not give way to envy or love or superstition, since these weaknesses are due to mere empty opinion; he will, however, feel pain and fear, these being natural affections; 10.127. For if he truly believes this, why does he not depart from life? It were easy for him to do so, if once he were firmly convinced. If he speaks only in mockery, his words are foolishness, for those who hear believe him not.We must remember that the future is neither wholly ours nor wholly not ours, so that neither must we count upon it as quite certain to come nor despair of it as quite certain not to come.We must also reflect that of desires some are natural, others are groundless; and that of the natural some are necessary as well as natural, and some natural only. And of the necessary desires some are necessary if we are to be happy, some if the body is to be rid of uneasiness, some if we are even to live.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
belief (doxa) Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 204
catullus Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 65
cicero Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 65
consciousness, objective Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 204
consciousness, subjective Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 204
consciousness Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 204
cynics, cyrenaics Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 204
de lacy, p. Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 204
epicureanism, ethics of Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 190
epicurus, on nature and the self Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 190, 204
epicurus/epicureanism, hedonic calculus Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 65
epicurus/epicureanism Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 65
good of others Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 190
happiness Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 190, 204
hedonism Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 204
judgement, as basis of emotions, suspension of, see justice Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 190
kalon, kalos Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 190
knowledge Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 204
lucretius Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 204; Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 65
memory Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 204
nature, and value Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 204
nature, of human beings Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 204
nature, of things Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 204
objectivism, objectivity Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 204
ovid, and epicurus Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 65
ovid, hedonic calculus in Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 65
pain, of mind Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 204
philodemus Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 65
phronesis Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 190
pleasure Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 190, 204
reason Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 190
self, concepts of Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 204
self-interest Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 190
social contract Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 190
subjectivity Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 204
tranquillity Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 204
tsouna, voula Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 65
utilitarianism, utility Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 190
virtue' Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 190