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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



2385
Cicero, Tusculan Disputations, 5.5
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

3 results
1. Xenophon, Memoirs, 1.4.12 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1.4.12. Again, though all creatures have a tongue, the tongue of man alone has been formed by them to be capable of contact with different parts of the mouth, so as to enable us to articulate the voice and express all our wants to one another. Once more, for all other creatures they have prescribed a fixed season of sexual indulgence; in our case the only time limit they have set is old age.
2. Cicero, On The Nature of The Gods, 1.6, 2.129 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.6. I observe however that a great deal of talk has been current about the large number of books that I have produced within a short space of time, and that such comment has not been all of one kind; some people have been curious as to the cause of this sudden outburst of philosophical interest on my part, while others have been eager to learn what positive opinions I hold on the various questions. Many also, as I have noticed, are surprised at my choosing to espouse a philosophy that in their view robs the world of daylight and floods it with a darkness as of night; and they wonder at my coming forward so unexpectedly as the champion of a derelict system and one that has long been given up. As a matter of fact however I am no new convert to the study of philosophy. From my earliest youth I have devoted no small amount of time and energy to it, and I pursued it most keenly at the very periods when I least appeared to be doing so, witness the philosophical maxims of which my speeches are full, and my intimacy with the learned men who have always graced my household, as well as those eminent professors, Diodotus, Philo, Antiochus and Posidonius, who were my instructors. 2.129. Why should I describe the affection shown by animals in rearing and protecting the offspring to which they have given birth, up to the point when they are able to defend themselves? although fishes, it is said, abandon their eggs when they have laid them, since these easily float and hatch out in the water. Turtles and crocodiles are said to lay their eggs on land and bury them and then go away, leaving their young to hatch and rear themselves. Hens and other birds find a quiet place in which to lay, and build themselves nests to sit on, covering these with the softest possible bedding in order to preserve the eggs most easily; and when they have hatched out their chicks they protect them by cherishing them with their wings so that they may not be injured by cold, and by shading them against the heat of the sun. When the young birds are able to use their sprouting wings, their mothers escort them in their flights, but are released from any further tendance upon them.
3. Cicero, Tusculan Disputations, 1.62 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.62. illa vis quae tandem est quae investigat occulta, quae inventio atque excogitatio dicitur? ex hacne tibi terrena mortalique natura et caduca concreta ea concreta ea concretus esse Bentl. videtur? aut qui primus, quod summae sapientiae Pythagorae visum est, omnibus rebus imposuit nomina? aut qui dissipatos homines congregavit et ad societatem vitae convocavit, vocum V 2 aut qui sonos vocis, qui infiniti videbantur, paucis litterarum notis terminavit, aut qui errantium stellarum cursus praegressiones insti tu tiones institiones Man. notavit? omnes magni; etiam superiores, qui fruges, qui vestitum, qui tecta, qui cultum vitae, qui praesidia contra feras invenerunt, a quibus mansuefacti et exculti a necessariis artificiis ad elegantiora eligantiora K ele g. R 1 defluximus. nam et auribus oblectatio magna parta est inventa parata ss. K 2 que post inventa add. V 2 et temperata varietate et natura sonorum, et astra suspeximus cum cum V, sed c in r. scr, V c tum X ea quae sunt infixa certis locis, tum illa non re sed vocabulo errantia, quorum conversiones omnisque motus qui animo animo Man. s animus vidit, is docuit similem animum suum eius esse, qui ea fabricatus esset in caelo.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
antiochus of ascalon Maso, CIcero's Philosophy (2022) 9
articulation Pezzini and Taylor,Language and Nature in the Classical Roman World (2019)" 19
athens Maso, CIcero's Philosophy (2022) 9
atticus t. pomponius Maso, CIcero's Philosophy (2022) 9
cicero Pezzini and Taylor,Language and Nature in the Classical Roman World (2019)" 19
clitomachus Maso, CIcero's Philosophy (2022) 9
culture and civilization, origin Pezzini and Taylor,Language and Nature in the Classical Roman World (2019)" 19
democritus Pezzini and Taylor,Language and Nature in the Classical Roman World (2019)" 19
desire / tendency / adpetitio Maso, CIcero's Philosophy (2022) 9
diodotus Maso, CIcero's Philosophy (2022) 9
diogenes of babylon Pezzini and Taylor,Language and Nature in the Classical Roman World (2019)" 19
imposition thesis Pezzini and Taylor,Language and Nature in the Classical Roman World (2019)" 19
invention, inventors of crafts Pezzini and Taylor,Language and Nature in the Classical Roman World (2019)" 19
language, linguistic, origin Pezzini and Taylor,Language and Nature in the Classical Roman World (2019)" 19
mithridates / mithridatic Maso, CIcero's Philosophy (2022) 9
name-givers onomathetai, impositores Pezzini and Taylor,Language and Nature in the Classical Roman World (2019)" 19
phaedrus Maso, CIcero's Philosophy (2022) 9
philo of larissa Maso, CIcero's Philosophy (2022) 9
philosophy, philosophical Pezzini and Taylor,Language and Nature in the Classical Roman World (2019)" 19
plato, cratylus Pezzini and Taylor,Language and Nature in the Classical Roman World (2019)" 19
plato Pezzini and Taylor,Language and Nature in the Classical Roman World (2019)" 19
posidonius Maso, CIcero's Philosophy (2022) 9; Pezzini and Taylor,Language and Nature in the Classical Roman World (2019)" 19
providence heimarmene Pezzini and Taylor,Language and Nature in the Classical Roman World (2019)" 19
pythagoras, pythagorean Pezzini and Taylor,Language and Nature in the Classical Roman World (2019)" 19
scepticism Maso, CIcero's Philosophy (2022) 9
socrates Pezzini and Taylor,Language and Nature in the Classical Roman World (2019)" 19
sounds, animal Pezzini and Taylor,Language and Nature in the Classical Roman World (2019)" 19
sounds, phonetics, phonology' Pezzini and Taylor,Language and Nature in the Classical Roman World (2019)" 19
stoics and stoicism Pezzini and Taylor,Language and Nature in the Classical Roman World (2019)" 19
vitruvius Pezzini and Taylor,Language and Nature in the Classical Roman World (2019)" 19
zeno of sidon Maso, CIcero's Philosophy (2022) 9