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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



2347
Cicero, Philippicae, 1.1


nanTHE FIRST PHILIPPIC. Before, O conscript fathers, I say those things concerning the republic which I think myself bound to say at the present time, I will explain to you briefly the cause of my departure from, and of my return to the city. When I hoped that the republic was at last recalled to a proper respect for your wisdom and for your authority, I thought that it became me to remain in a sort of sentinelship, which was imposed upon me by my position as a senator and a man of consular rank. Nor did I depart anywhere, nor did I ever take my eyes off from the republic, from the day on which we were summoned to meet in the temple of Tellus; in which temple, I, as far as was in my power, laid the foundations of peace, and renewed the ancient precedent set by the Athenians; I even used the Greek word, which that city employed in those times in allaying discords, and gave my vote that all recollection of the existing dissensions ought to be effaced by everlasting oblivion.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

4 results
1. Cicero, On Divination, 2.150 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.150. Perfugium videtur omnium laborum et sollicitudinum esse somnus. At ex eo ipso plurumae curae metusque nascuntur; qui quidem ipsi per se minus valerent et magis contemnerentur, nisi somniorum patrocinium philosophi suscepissent, nec ii quidem contemptissimi, sed in primis acuti et consequentia et repugtia videntes, qui prope iam absoluti et perfecti putantur. Quorum licentiae nisi Carneades restitisset, haud scio an soli iam philosophi iudicarentur. Cum quibus omnis fere nobis disceptatio contentioque est, non quod eos maxume contemnamus, sed quod videntur acutissime sententias suas prudentissimeque defendere. Cum autem proprium sit Academiae iudicium suum nullum interponere, ea probare, quae simillima veri videantur, conferre causas et, quid in quamque sententiam dici possit, expromere, nulla adhibita sua auctoritate iudicium audientium relinquere integrum ac liberum, tenebimus hanc consuetudinem a Socrate traditam eaque inter nos, si tibi, Quinte frater, placebit, quam saepissime utemur. Mihi vero, inquit ille, nihil potest esse iucundius. Quae cum essent dicta, surreximus.
2. Cicero, De Domo Sua, 145, 144 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

144. si hac indigna suspicione careat, animo aequo se carere suis omnibus commodis dicit. rogat oratque te, Chrysogone, si nihil de patris fortunis amplissimis in suam rem convertit, si nulla in re te fraudavit, si tibi optima fide sua omnia concessit, adnumeravit, appendit, si vestitum quo ipse tectus erat anulumque de digito de digito Boemoraeus : dedit os codd. suum tibi tradidit, si ex omnibus rebus se ipsum nudum neque praeterea quicquam excepit, ut sibi per te liceat innocenti amicorum opibus vitam in egestate degere.
3. Cicero, On The Nature of The Gods, 1.10 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.10. Those however who seek to learn my personal opinion on the various questions show an unreasonable degree of curiosity. In discussion it is not so much weight of authority as force of argument that should be demanded. Indeed the authority of those who profess to teach is often a positive hindrance to those who desire to learn; they cease to employ their own judgement, and take what they perceive to be the verdict of their chosen master as settling the question. In fact I am not disposed to approve the practice traditionally ascribed to the Pythagoreans, who, when questioned as to the grounds of any assertion that they advanced in debate, are said to have been accustomed to reply 'He himself said so,' 'he himself' being Pythagoras. So potent was an opinion already decided, making authority prevail unsupported by reason.
4. Cicero, Letters To Quintus, 1.3.6 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
academic philosophy, attitude towards auctoritas Wardy and Warren, Authors and Authorities in Ancient Philosophy (2018) 280
antiochus Bryan, Authors and Authorities in Ancient Philosophy (2018) 280; Wardy and Warren, Authors and Authorities in Ancient Philosophy (2018) 280
attacks Ker and Wessels, The Values of Nighttime in Classical Antiquity: Between Dusk and Dawn (2020) 222
auctoritas, contrasted with ratio Wardy and Warren, Authors and Authorities in Ancient Philosophy (2018) 280
auctoritas Wardy and Warren, Authors and Authorities in Ancient Philosophy (2018) 280
batstone, william Ker and Wessels, The Values of Nighttime in Classical Antiquity: Between Dusk and Dawn (2020) 222
catiline Ker and Wessels, The Values of Nighttime in Classical Antiquity: Between Dusk and Dawn (2020) 222
cicero, academic scepticism Bryan, Authors and Authorities in Ancient Philosophy (2018) 280; Wardy and Warren, Authors and Authorities in Ancient Philosophy (2018) 280
cicero, catilinarians Ker and Wessels, The Values of Nighttime in Classical Antiquity: Between Dusk and Dawn (2020) 222
cicero, philippics Ker and Wessels, The Values of Nighttime in Classical Antiquity: Between Dusk and Dawn (2020) 222
cicero, verrines Ker and Wessels, The Values of Nighttime in Classical Antiquity: Between Dusk and Dawn (2020) 222
cicero Bryan, Authors and Authorities in Ancient Philosophy (2018) 280; Ker and Wessels, The Values of Nighttime in Classical Antiquity: Between Dusk and Dawn (2020) 222; Wardy and Warren, Authors and Authorities in Ancient Philosophy (2018) 280
metaphor Ker and Wessels, The Values of Nighttime in Classical Antiquity: Between Dusk and Dawn (2020) 222
res publica Ker and Wessels, The Values of Nighttime in Classical Antiquity: Between Dusk and Dawn (2020) 222
vigilance/vigilantia Ker and Wessels, The Values of Nighttime in Classical Antiquity: Between Dusk and Dawn (2020) 222
vigilia/vigiliae Ker and Wessels, The Values of Nighttime in Classical Antiquity: Between Dusk and Dawn (2020) 222
wakefulness' Ker and Wessels, The Values of Nighttime in Classical Antiquity: Between Dusk and Dawn (2020) 222