Home About Network of subjects Linked subjects heatmap Book indices included Search by subject Search by reference Browse subjects Browse texts

Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



2296
Cicero, On Invention, 1.100


res autem inducetur, si alicui rei huiusmodi, legi, loco, urbi, mo- numento oratio attribuetur per enumerationem, hoc modo: quid? si leges loqui possent, nonne haec apud vos quererentur: quidnam amplius desideratis, iudi- ces, cum vobis hoc et hoc planum factum sit? in hoc quoque genere omnibus isdem modis uti licebit. com- mune autem praeceptum hoc datur ad enumerationem, ut ex una quaque argumentatione, quoniam tota iterum dici non potest, id eligatur, quod erit gravissimum, et unum quidque quam brevissime transeatur, ut me- moria, non oratio renovata videatur. Indignatio est oratio, per quam conficitur, ut in aliquem hominem magnum odium aut in rem gravis offensio concitetur. in hoc genere illud primum in- tellegi volumus, posse omnibus ex locis iis, quos in confirmandi praeceptione posuimus, tractari indigna- tionem. nam ex iis rebus, quae personis aut quae negotiis sunt attributae, quaevis amplificationes et indignationes nasci possunt, sed tamen ea, quae se- paratim de indignatione praecipi possunt, considere-But a different class of circumstance will be introduced if an enumerative oration be connected with any subject of this sort,—law, place, city, or monument, in this manner:—"What if the laws themselves could speak? Would not they also address this complaint to you? What more do you require, O judges, when this, and this, and this has been already made plain to you?" And in this kind of argument it is allowable to use all these same methods. But this is given as a common precept to guide one in framing an enumeration, that out of every part of the argument, since the whole cannot be repeated over again, that is to be selected which is of the greatest weight, and that each point is to be run over as briefly as possible, so that it shall appear to be only a refreshing of the recollection of the hearers, not a repetition of the speech. Indignation is a kind of speech by which the effect produced is, that great hatred is excited against a man, or great dislike of some proceeding is originated. In an address of this kind we wish to have this understood first, that it is possible to give vent to indignation from all those topics which we have suggested in laying down precepts for the confirmation of a speech. For any amplifications whatever and every sort of indignation may be expressed, derived from those circumstances which are attributed to persons and to things; but still we had better consider those precepts which can be laid down separately with respect to indignation.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

11 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 18.108-18.110 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

18.108. /I that in war am such as is none other of the brazen-coated Achaeans, albeit in council there be others better— so may strife perish from among gods and men, and anger that setteth a man on to grow wroth, how wise soever he be, and that sweeter far than trickling honey 18.109. /I that in war am such as is none other of the brazen-coated Achaeans, albeit in council there be others better— so may strife perish from among gods and men, and anger that setteth a man on to grow wroth, how wise soever he be, and that sweeter far than trickling honey 18.110. /waxeth like smoke in the breasts of men; even as but now the king of men, Agamemnon, moved me to wrath. Howbeit these things will we let be as past and done, for all our pain, curbing the heart in our breasts, because we must. But now will I go forth that I may light on the slayer of the man I loved
2. Plato, Philebus, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

47e. Soc. Do you not regard anger, fear, yearning, mourning, love, jealousy, envy, and the like as pains of the soul and the soul only? Pro. I do. Soc. And shall we not find them full of ineffable pleasures? Or must I remind you of the anger? Which stirs a man, though very wise, to wrath, And sweeter is than honey from the comb, Hom. Il. 18.108-109
3. Aristotle, Rhetoric, 2.19.26 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

4. Cicero, Orator, 1.220, 2.189-2.204, 2.214-2.215 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

5. Cicero, Topica, 98 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

98. quae autem sequitur consequitur Af narrationem fides, ea persuadendo quoniam efficitur, qui ad persuadendum loci maxime valeant dictum est in eis his codd. : is Af in quibus de omni ratione dicendi. Peroratio autem et et om. AO alia quaedam habet et maxime amplificationem, cuius effectus hic debet esse, ut aut perturbentur animi aut tranquillentur et, si ita adfecti iam ante sint, ut aut augeat eorum motus aut sedet oratio.
6. Anon., Rhetorica Ad Herennium, 2.49 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.49.  (6) By means of the sixth commonplace we show that the act was done with premeditation, and declare that for an intentional crime there is no excuse, although a rightful plea of mercy is provided for an unpremeditated act. (7) By means of the seventh commonplace we show it is a foul crime, cruel, sacrilegious, and tyrannical; such a crime as the outraging of women, or one of those crimes that incite wars and life-and‑death struggles with enemies of the state. (8) By means of the eighth commonplace we show that it is not a common but a unique crime, base, nefarious, and unheard‑of, and therefore must be the more promptly and drastically avenged. (9) The ninth commonplace consists of comparison of wrongs, as when we shall say it is a more heinous crime to debauch a free-born person than to steal a sacred object, because the one is done from unbridled licentiousness and the other from need. (10) By the tenth commonplace we shall examine sharply, incriminatingly, and precisely, everything that took place in the actual execution of the deed and all the circumstances that usually attend such an act, so that by the enumeration of the attendant circumstances the crime may seem to be taking place and the action to unfold before our eyes.
7. Juvenal, Satires, 4, 1 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

8. Quintilian, Institutes of Oratory, 3.5, 8.4.12 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

8.4.12.  I would not, however, have anyone think that this method is identical with that used in argument, where the greater is inferred from the less, although there is a certain resemblance between the two. For in the latter case we are aiming at proof, in the former at amplification; for example, in the passage just cited about Oppianicus, the object of the comparison is not to show that his action was a crime, but that it was even worse than another crime. There is, however, a certain affinity between the two methods, and I will therefore repeat a passage which I quoted there, although my present purpose is different.
9. Seneca The Younger, On Anger, 1.3.2-1.3.4, 1.12.1 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

10. Valerius Maximus, Memorable Deeds And Sayings, 9.3 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

11. Pliny The Younger, Panegyric, 48 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aims, proofs Martin and Whitlark, Inventing Hebrews: Design and Purpose in Ancient Rhetoric (2018) 99
amplification, in argumentatio Martin and Whitlark, Inventing Hebrews: Design and Purpose in Ancient Rhetoric (2018) 99
ancient audience Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 30, 31, 53
anger, and status Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 30, 31
anger, contexts for interpreting Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 31
anger, pleasures of Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 31
anger control discourse Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 30
argumentatio Martin and Whitlark, Inventing Hebrews: Design and Purpose in Ancient Rhetoric (2018) 99
artless, topics Martin and Whitlark, Inventing Hebrews: Design and Purpose in Ancient Rhetoric (2018) 99
deliberative Martin and Whitlark, Inventing Hebrews: Design and Purpose in Ancient Rhetoric (2018) 99, 247
domitian Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 53
friendship and the satirist Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 53
hatred, and cannibalism, and historiography Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 53
hatred, and cannibalism, as orator’s goal Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 30, 31
indignatio, in satiric plot Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 27, 28, 30, 31, 53
indignatio, strategies for performing Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 28, 30, 31
iulius victor, c. Pausch and Pieper, The Scholia on Cicero’s Speeches: Contexts and Perspectives (2023) 97
luxury Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 28
martianus minneus felix capella' Pausch and Pieper, The Scholia on Cicero’s Speeches: Contexts and Perspectives (2023) 97
masculinity Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 30, 31, 53
moral decline Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 28
morality of satire Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 30
peroratio, length Martin and Whitlark, Inventing Hebrews: Design and Purpose in Ancient Rhetoric (2018) 247
peroratio Martin and Whitlark, Inventing Hebrews: Design and Purpose in Ancient Rhetoric (2018) 247
persona theory Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 30
philosophical interpretation of juvenal Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 30
poets Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 27
revenge, and anger Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 31, 53
revenge, satire as Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 27
rhetoric as entertainment Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 30
rhetorical education, and performance of emotions Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 27, 28, 53
rhetorical handbooks Martin and Whitlark, Inventing Hebrews: Design and Purpose in Ancient Rhetoric (2018) 99
rhetorical theory, emotion in Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 30, 31, 53
sorrow Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 53
sulla Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 27
trajan Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 53
weeping" Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 28