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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



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Cicero, On Fate, 39-45
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

27 results
1. Hebrew Bible, Deuteronomy, 30.15, 30.19 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

30.15. רְאֵה נָתַתִּי לְפָנֶיךָ הַיּוֹם אֶת־הַחַיִּים וְאֶת־הַטּוֹב וְאֶת־הַמָּוֶת וְאֶת־הָרָע׃ 30.19. הַעִידֹתִי בָכֶם הַיּוֹם אֶת־הַשָּׁמַיִם וְאֶת־הָאָרֶץ הַחַיִּים וְהַמָּוֶת נָתַתִּי לְפָנֶיךָ הַבְּרָכָה וְהַקְּלָלָה וּבָחַרְתָּ בַּחַיִּים לְמַעַן תִּחְיֶה אַתָּה וְזַרְעֶךָ׃ 30.15. See, I have set before thee this day life and good, and death and evil," 30.19. I call heaven and earth to witness against you this day, that I have set before thee life and death, the blessing and the curse; therefore choose life, that thou mayest live, thou and thy seed;"
2. Hebrew Bible, Exodus, 11-14, 4-10 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

3. Hebrew Bible, Isaiah, 1.16-1.20 (8th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1.16. רַחֲצוּ הִזַּכּוּ הָסִירוּ רֹעַ מַעַלְלֵיכֶם מִנֶּגֶד עֵינָי חִדְלוּ הָרֵעַ׃ 1.17. לִמְדוּ הֵיטֵב דִּרְשׁוּ מִשְׁפָּט אַשְּׁרוּ חָמוֹץ שִׁפְטוּ יָתוֹם רִיבוּ אַלְמָנָה׃ 1.18. לְכוּ־נָא וְנִוָּכְחָה יֹאמַר יְהוָה אִם־יִהְיוּ חֲטָאֵיכֶם כַּשָּׁנִים כַּשֶּׁלֶג יַלְבִּינוּ אִם־יַאְדִּימוּ כַתּוֹלָע כַּצֶּמֶר יִהְיוּ׃ 1.19. אִם־תֹּאבוּ וּשְׁמַעְתֶּם טוּב הָאָרֶץ תֹּאכֵלוּ׃ 1.16. Wash you, make you clean, Put away the evil of your doings From before Mine eyes, Cease to do evil;" 1.17. Learn to do well; Seek justice, relieve the oppressed, Judge the fatherless, plead for the widow." 1.18. Come now, and let us reason together, Saith the LORD; Though your sins be as scarlet, They shall be as white as snow; Though they be red like crimson, They shall be as wool." 1.19. If ye be willing and obedient, Ye shall eat the good of the land;" 1.20. But if ye refuse and rebel, Ye shall be devoured with the sword; For the mouth of the LORD hath spoken."
4. Plato, Republic, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

5. Aristotle, Eudemian Ethics, 2.7 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

6. Aristotle, Nicomachean Ethics, 2.4 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

7. Cicero, On Divination, 2.61 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.61. Quorum omnium causas si a Chrysippo quaeram, ipse ille divinationis auctor numquam illa dicet facta fortuito naturalemque rationem omnium reddet; nihil enim fieri sine causa potest; nec quicquam fit, quod fieri non potest; nec, si id factum est, quod potuit fieri, portentum debet videri; nulla igitur portenta sunt. Nam si, quod raro fit, id portentum putandum est, sapientem esse portentum est; saepius enim mulam peperisse arbitror quam sapientem fuisse. Illa igitur ratio concluditur: nec id, quod non potuerit fieri, factum umquam esse, nec, quod potuerit, id portentum esse; 2.61. If I were to ask Chrysippus the causes of all the phenomena just mentioned, that distinguished writer on divination would never say that they happened by chance, but he would find an explanation for each of them in the laws of nature. For he would say: Nothing can happen without a cause; nothing actually happens that cannot happen; if that has happened which could have happened, then it should not be considered a portent; therefore there are no such things as portents. Now if a thing is to be considered a portent because it is seldom seen, then a wise man is a portent; for, as I think, it oftener happens that a mule brings forth a colt than that nature produces a sage. Chrysippus, in this connexion, gives the following syllogism: That which could not have happened never did happen; and that which could have happened is no portent; therefore, in any view, there is no such thing as a portent.
8. Cicero, On Fate, 11-16, 20-23, 25-29, 3, 30-34, 36, 40-45, 47-48, 5-10 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

9. Cicero, On The Ends of Good And Evil, 4.28 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4.28. cuiuscumque enim modi animal constitueris, necesse est, etiamsi id sine corpore sit, ut fingimus, tamen esse in animo quaedam similia eorum, quae sunt in corpore, ut nullo ut nullo et nullo BE modo, nisi ut exposui, constitui possit finis bonorum. Chrysippus autem exponens differentias animantium ait alias earum corpore excellere, alias autem animo, non nullas valere utraque re; deinde disputat, quod cuiusque generis animantium animantium BE animā t R ani- mantis NV statui deceat extremum. cum autem hominem in eo genere posuisset, ut ei tribueret animi excellentiam, summum bonum id constituit, non ut excellere excellere BER excelleret NV animus, sed ut nihil esse praeter animum videretur. uno autem modo in virtute sola summum bonum recte poneretur, si quod esset animal, quod totum ex mente constaret, id ipsum tamen sic, ut ea mens nihil haberet in se, quod esset secundum naturam, ut valitudo est. 4.28.  In fact you may construct a living creature of any sort you like, but even if it be devoid of a body like our imaginary being, nevertheless its mind will be bound to possess certain attributes analogous to those of the body, and consequently it will be impossible to set up for it an end of Goods on any other lines than those which I have laid down. Chrysippus, on the other hand, in his survey of the different species of living things states that in some the body is the principal part, in others the mind, while there are some that are equally endowed in respect of either; and then he proceeds to discuss what constitutes the ultimate good proper to each species. Man he so classified as to make the mind the principal part in him; and yet he so defined man's End as to make it appear, not that he is principally mind, but that he consists of nothing else.  But the only case in which it would be correct to place the Chief Good in virtue alone is if there existed a creature consisting solely of pure intellect, with the further proviso that this intellect possessed nothing of its own that was in accordance with nature, as bodily health is.
10. Cicero, On The Nature of The Gods, 1.10 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.10. Those however who seek to learn my personal opinion on the various questions show an unreasonable degree of curiosity. In discussion it is not so much weight of authority as force of argument that should be demanded. Indeed the authority of those who profess to teach is often a positive hindrance to those who desire to learn; they cease to employ their own judgement, and take what they perceive to be the verdict of their chosen master as settling the question. In fact I am not disposed to approve the practice traditionally ascribed to the Pythagoreans, who, when questioned as to the grounds of any assertion that they advanced in debate, are said to have been accustomed to reply 'He himself said so,' 'he himself' being Pythagoras. So potent was an opinion already decided, making authority prevail unsupported by reason.
11. Cicero, On Duties, 4.28 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

12. Philo of Alexandria, On The Contemplative Life, 90, 89 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

89. therefore, being intoxicated all night till the morning with this beautiful intoxication, without feeling their heads heavy or closing their eyes for sleep, but being even more awake than when they came to the feast, as to their eyes and their whole bodies, and standing there till morning, when they saw the sun rising they raised their hands to heaven, imploring tranquillity and truth, and acuteness of understanding. And after their prayers they each retired to their own separate abodes, with the intention of again practising the usual philosophy to which they had been wont to devote themselves.
13. Epictetus, Discourses, 1.14, 2.8.9-2.8.14 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

14. Josephus Flavius, Jewish Antiquities, 10.277-10.280, 13.172-13.173, 14.172-14.176, 15.3-15.4, 16.397, 17.41-17.45, 18.13, 18.18 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

10.277. All these things did this man leave in writing, as God had showed them to him, insomuch that such as read his prophecies, and see how they have been fulfilled, would wonder at the honor wherewith God honored Daniel; and may thence discover how the Epicureans are in an error 10.278. who cast Providence out of human life, and do not believe that God takes care of the affairs of the world, nor that the universe is governed and continued in being by that blessed and immortal nature, but say that the world is carried along of its own accord, without a ruler and a curator; 10.279. which, were it destitute of a guide to conduct it, as they imagine, it would be like ships without pilots, which we see drowned by the winds, or like chariots without drivers, which are overturned; so would the world be dashed to pieces by its being carried without a Providence, and so perish, and come to nought. 13.172. Now for the Pharisees, they say that some actions, but not all, are the work of fate, and some of them are in our own power, and that they are liable to fate, but are not caused by fate. But the sect of the Essenes affirm, that fate governs all things, and that nothing befalls men but what is according to its determination. 13.173. And for the Sadducees, they take away fate, and say there is no such thing, and that the events of human affairs are not at its disposal; but they suppose that all our actions are in our own power, so that we are ourselves the causes of what is good, and receive what is evil from our own folly. However, I have given a more exact account of these opinions in the second book of the Jewish War. 14.172. When affairs stood thus, one whose name was Sameas, a righteous man he was, and for that reason above all fear, rose up, and said, “O you that are assessors with me, and O thou that art our king, I neither have ever myself known such a case, nor do I suppose that any one of you can name its parallel, that one who is called to take his trial by us ever stood in such a manner before us; but every one, whosoever he be, that comes to be tried by this Sanhedrim, presents himself in a submissive manner, and like one that is in fear of himself, and that endeavors to move us to compassion, with his hair dishevelled, and in a black and mourning garment: 14.173. but this admirable man Herod, who is accused of murder, and called to answer so heavy an accusation, stands here clothed in purple, and with the hair of his head finely trimmed, and with his armed men about him, that if we shall condemn him by our law, he may slay us, and by overbearing justice may himself escape death. 14.174. Yet do not I make this complaint against Herod himself; he is to be sure more concerned for himself than for the laws; but my complaint is against yourselves, and your king, who gave him a license so to do. However, take you notice, that God is great, and that this very man, whom you are going to absolve and dismiss, for the sake of Hyrcanus, will one day punish both you and your king himself also.” 14.175. Nor did Sameas mistake in any part of this prediction; for when Herod had received the kingdom, he slew all the members of this Sanhedrim, and Hyrcanus himself also, excepting Sameas 14.176. for he had a great honor for him on account of his righteousness, and because, when the city was afterward besieged by Herod and Sosius, he persuaded the people to admit Herod into it; and told them that for their sins they would not be able to escape his hands:—which things will be related by us in their proper places. 15.3. But Pollio the Pharisee, and Sameas, a disciple of his, were honored by him above all the rest; for when Jerusalem was besieged, they advised the citizens to receive Herod, for which advice they were well requited. 15.3. He therefore wrote back to him, that if this boy should only go out of the country, all would be in a state of war and uproar, because the Jews were in hopes of a change in the government, and to have another king over them. 15.3. for, in the first place, there were perpetual droughts, and for that reason the ground was barren, and did not bring forth the same quantity of fruits that it used to produce; and after this barrenness of the soil, that change of food which the want of corn occasioned produced distempers in the bodies of men, and a pestilential disease prevailed, one misery following upon the back of another; 15.4. But this Pollio, at the time when Herod was once upon his trial of life and death, foretold, in way of reproach, to Hyrcanus and the other judges, how this Herod, whom they suffered now to escape, would afterward inflict punishment on them all; which had its completion in time, while God fulfilled the words he had spoken. 15.4. When this work [for the foundation] was done in this manner, and joined together as part of the hill itself to the very top of it, he wrought it all into one outward surface, and filled up the hollow places which were about the wall, and made it a level on the external upper surface, and a smooth level also. This hill was walled all round, and in compass four furlongs, [the distance of] each angle containing in length a furlong: 15.4. whence Aelus came. He was one of the stock of the high priests and had been of old a particular friend of Herod; and when he was first made king, he conferred that dignity upon him, and now put him out of it again, in order to quiet the troubles in his family, though what he did was plainly unlawful, for at no other time [of old] was any one that had once been in that dignity deprived of it. 16.397. or, indeed, whether fortune have not greater power than all prudent reasonings; whence we are persuaded that human actions are thereby determined beforehand by an inevitable necessity, and we call her Fate, because there is nothing which is not done by her; 17.41. For there was a certain sect of men that were Jews, who valued themselves highly upon the exact skill they had in the law of their fathers, and made men believe they were highly favored by God, by whom this set of women were inveigled. These are those that are called the sect of the Pharisees, who were in a capacity of greatly opposing kings. A cunning sect they were, and soon elevated to a pitch of open fighting and doing mischief. 17.42. Accordingly, when all the people of the Jews gave assurance of their good-will to Caesar, and to the king’s government, these very men did not swear, being above six thousand; and when the king imposed a fine upon them, Pheroras’s wife paid their fine for them. 17.43. In order to requite which kindness of hers, since they were believed to have the foreknowledge of things to come by divine inspiration, they foretold how God had decreed that Herod’s government should cease, and his posterity should be deprived of it; but that the kingdom should come to her and Pheroras, and to their children. 17.44. These predictions were not concealed from Salome, but were told the king; as also how they had perverted some persons about the palace itself; so the king slew such of the Pharisees as were principally accused, and Bagoas the eunuch, and one Carus, who exceeded all men of that time in comeliness, and one that was his catamite. He slew also all those of his own family who had consented to what the Pharisees foretold; 17.45. and for Bagoas, he had been puffed up by them, as though he should be named the father and the benefactor of him who, by the prediction, was foretold to be their appointed king; for that this king would have all things in his power, and would enable Bagoas to marry, and to have children of his own body begotten. 18.13. and when they determine that all things are done by fate, they do not take away the freedom from men of acting as they think fit; since their notion is, that it hath pleased God to make a temperament, whereby what he wills is done, but so that the will of man can act virtuously or viciously. 18.13. 4. Herod the Great had two daughters by Mariamne, the [grand] daughter of Hyrcanus; the one was Salampsio, who was married to Phasaelus, her first cousin, who was himself the son of Phasaelus, Herod’s brother, her father making the match; the other was Cypros, who was herself married also to her first cousin Antipater, the son of Salome, Herod’s sister. 18.18. 5. The doctrine of the Essenes is this: That all things are best ascribed to God. They teach the immortality of souls, and esteem that the rewards of righteousness are to be earnestly striven for; 18.18. Now Antonia was greatly esteemed by Tiberius on all accounts, from the dignity of her relation to him, who had been his brother Drusus’s wife, and from her eminent chastity; for though she was still a young woman, she continued in her widowhood, and refused all other matches, although Augustus had enjoined her to be married to somebody else; yet did she all along preserve her reputation free from reproach.
15. New Testament, 1 Corinthians, 1.17-1.25, 2.1-2.3 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

1.17. For Christ sent me not to baptize, but topreach the gospel -- not in wisdom of words, so that the cross ofChrist wouldn't be made void. 1.18. For the word of the cross isfoolishness to those who are dying, but to us who are saved it is thepower of God. 1.19. For it is written,"I will destroy the wisdom of the wise,I will bring the discernment of the discerning to nothing. 1.20. Where is the wise? Where is the scribe? Where is the lawyerof this world? Hasn't God made foolish the wisdom of this world? 1.21. For seeing that in the wisdom of God, the world through its wisdomdidn't know God, it was God's good pleasure through the foolishness ofthe preaching to save those who believe. 1.22. For Jews ask for signs,Greeks seek after wisdom 1.23. but we preach Christ crucified; astumbling block to Jews, and foolishness to Greeks 1.24. but to thosewho are called, both Jews and Greeks, Christ is the power of God andthe wisdom of God. 1.25. Because the foolishness of God is wiser thanmen, and the weakness of God is stronger than men. 2.1. When I came to you, brothers, I didn't come with excellence ofspeech or of wisdom, proclaiming to you the testimony of God. 2.2. ForI determined not to know anything among you, except Jesus Christ, andhim crucified. 2.3. I was with you in weakness, in fear, and in muchtrembling.
16. New Testament, 2 Corinthians, 7.15, 10.3-10.6 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

17. New Testament, Ephesians, 6.5 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

6.5. Servants, be obedient to those who according to the flesh are your masters, with fear and trembling, in singleness of your heart, as to Christ;
18. New Testament, Philippians, 2.2 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

2.2. make my joy full, by being like-minded, having the same love, being of one accord, of one mind;
19. Plutarch, On Stoic Self-Contradictions, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

20. Seneca The Younger, De Providentia (Dialogorum Liber I), 5.6 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

21. Gellius, Attic Nights, 7.2.6-7.2.13 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

22. Justin, Second Apology, 7.4-7.6 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

23. Lucian, Zeus Catechized, 7 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

24. Marcus Aurelius Emperor of Rome, Meditations, 12.2 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

25. Plotinus, Enneads, 3.1.2 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

26. Manilius, Astronomica, 2.115

27. Stoic School, Stoicor. Veter. Fragm., 2.974



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
action, and desire Hankinson, Cause and Explanation in Ancient Greek Thought (1998) 255
action, voluntary Hankinson, Cause and Explanation in Ancient Greek Thought (1998) 255
agency Atkins, The Cambridge Companion to Cicero's Philosophy (2021) 143, 144
alexander of aphrodisias, on deliberation (βούλευσις) Brouwer and Vimercati, Fate, Providence and Free Will: Philosophy and Religion in Dialogue in the Early Imperial Age (2020) 145
alexander of aphrodisias, on what is up to us (ἐφ ἡμῖν) Brouwer and Vimercati, Fate, Providence and Free Will: Philosophy and Religion in Dialogue in the Early Imperial Age (2020) 145
alexander of aphrodisias Brouwer and Vimercati, Fate, Providence and Free Will: Philosophy and Religion in Dialogue in the Early Imperial Age (2020) 145
analogy Inwood and Warren, Body and Soul in Hellenistic Philosophy (2020) 125
antisthenes Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 308
argument Maso, CIcero's Philosophy (2022) 41, 127
aristotelians/aristotelianism, as indeterminists Brouwer and Vimercati, Fate, Providence and Free Will: Philosophy and Religion in Dialogue in the Early Imperial Age (2020) 145
aristotle Taylor and Hay, Philo of Alexandria: On the Contemplative Life: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2020) 295
assent Atkins, The Cambridge Companion to Cicero's Philosophy (2021) 144; Inwood and Warren, Body and Soul in Hellenistic Philosophy (2020) 125; Jedan, Stoic Virtues: Chrysippus and the Religious Character of Stoic Ethics (2009) 42, 44
assent (sunkatathesis) Hankinson, Cause and Explanation in Ancient Greek Thought (1998) 255
assent / adsensio / adsensus / συγκατάθεσις Maso, CIcero's Philosophy (2022) 41, 97
atom / atomism Maso, CIcero's Philosophy (2022) 41
atomism Atkins, The Cambridge Companion to Cicero's Philosophy (2021) 144
body Atkins, The Cambridge Companion to Cicero's Philosophy (2021) 144; Jedan, Stoic Virtues: Chrysippus and the Religious Character of Stoic Ethics (2009) 44
carneades of cyrene Maso, CIcero's Philosophy (2022) 41
cato m. porcius uticensis (the younger) Maso, CIcero's Philosophy (2022) 97
causality / causa / αἰτία Maso, CIcero's Philosophy (2022) 127
causation, on fate Hankinson, Cause and Explanation in Ancient Greek Thought (1998) 255
causation Jedan, Stoic Virtues: Chrysippus and the Religious Character of Stoic Ethics (2009) 42, 44
causes Atkins, The Cambridge Companion to Cicero's Philosophy (2021) 143
choice Atkins, The Cambridge Companion to Cicero's Philosophy (2021) 143
christians, christianity Brouwer and Vimercati, Fate, Providence and Free Will: Philosophy and Religion in Dialogue in the Early Imperial Age (2020) 216
chrysippus, on action Hankinson, Cause and Explanation in Ancient Greek Thought (1998) 255
chrysippus, on assent Hankinson, Cause and Explanation in Ancient Greek Thought (1998) 255
chrysippus Atkins, The Cambridge Companion to Cicero's Philosophy (2021) 143, 144; Inwood and Warren, Body and Soul in Hellenistic Philosophy (2020) 125; Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 308; Maso, CIcero's Philosophy (2022) 41, 97, 127; Wilson, Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology (2018) 19
chryssipus Taylor and Hay, Philo of Alexandria: On the Contemplative Life: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2020) 295
cicero Wilson, Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology (2018) 19
compatibilism Hankinson, Cause and Explanation in Ancient Greek Thought (1998) 255
consensus Atkins, The Cambridge Companion to Cicero's Philosophy (2021) 143
cosmology Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 168
cynics/cynicism, free will Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 308
cynics/cynicism Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 308
deliberation (βούλευσις) Brouwer and Vimercati, Fate, Providence and Free Will: Philosophy and Religion in Dialogue in the Early Imperial Age (2020) 145
demetrius ii Taylor, The Essenes, the Scrolls, and the Dead Sea (2012) 88
democritus Maso, CIcero's Philosophy (2022) 41
desire / tendency / adpetitio Maso, CIcero's Philosophy (2022) 97
destiny, concept of Taylor, The Essenes, the Scrolls, and the Dead Sea (2012) 88, 89
determinism Atkins, The Cambridge Companion to Cicero's Philosophy (2021) 143, 144; Hankinson, Cause and Explanation in Ancient Greek Thought (1998) 255; Maso, CIcero's Philosophy (2022) 127; Wilson, Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology (2018) 19
diodorus cronus Maso, CIcero's Philosophy (2022) 41
divination Atkins, The Cambridge Companion to Cicero's Philosophy (2021) 143
empedocles Maso, CIcero's Philosophy (2022) 41
epictetus Inwood and Warren, Body and Soul in Hellenistic Philosophy (2020) 125
epicureanism Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 17
epicureans Taylor, The Essenes, the Scrolls, and the Dead Sea (2012) 89
epicurus Atkins, The Cambridge Companion to Cicero's Philosophy (2021) 144
fairmindedness, all-embracing Jedan, Stoic Virtues: Chrysippus and the Religious Character of Stoic Ethics (2009) 42
fairmindedness, personal Jedan, Stoic Virtues: Chrysippus and the Religious Character of Stoic Ethics (2009) 42, 44
fate Atkins, The Cambridge Companion to Cicero's Philosophy (2021) 143; Hankinson, Cause and Explanation in Ancient Greek Thought (1998) 255; Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 168
fate / fatum / εἱμαρμένη Maso, CIcero's Philosophy (2022) 41, 97, 127
fragment, soul as a fragment of cosmos Inwood and Warren, Body and Soul in Hellenistic Philosophy (2020) 125
free choice/free will Wilson, Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology (2018) 19
freedom, and determinism Hankinson, Cause and Explanation in Ancient Greek Thought (1998) 255
freedom, pauline Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 308
freedom / libertas Maso, CIcero's Philosophy (2022) 41, 127
future Maso, CIcero's Philosophy (2022) 41, 127
god, stoic Inwood and Warren, Body and Soul in Hellenistic Philosophy (2020) 125
gods, justin on Brouwer and Vimercati, Fate, Providence and Free Will: Philosophy and Religion in Dialogue in the Early Imperial Age (2020) 216
hasmonean dynasty Taylor, The Essenes, the Scrolls, and the Dead Sea (2012) 88
heraclitus Maso, CIcero's Philosophy (2022) 41
hirtius a. Maso, CIcero's Philosophy (2022) 41
hēgemonikon/central organ of soul, etc. Inwood and Warren, Body and Soul in Hellenistic Philosophy (2020) 125
impressions Atkins, The Cambridge Companion to Cicero's Philosophy (2021) 144
impulses Atkins, The Cambridge Companion to Cicero's Philosophy (2021) 144
indeterminism/antideterminism Brouwer and Vimercati, Fate, Providence and Free Will: Philosophy and Religion in Dialogue in the Early Imperial Age (2020) 145
indeterminism Maso, CIcero's Philosophy (2022) 41
jewish law/legal schools, josephus three schools Taylor, The Essenes, the Scrolls, and the Dead Sea (2012) 88, 89
josephus, and judaisms three schools of law Taylor, The Essenes, the Scrolls, and the Dead Sea (2012) 88, 89
josephus Taylor, The Essenes, the Scrolls, and the Dead Sea (2012) 88, 89
josephus essenes, and destiny Taylor, The Essenes, the Scrolls, and the Dead Sea (2012) 88
josephus essenes, as prophets/dream interpreters Taylor, The Essenes, the Scrolls, and the Dead Sea (2012) 89
josephus essenes, judaism of Taylor, The Essenes, the Scrolls, and the Dead Sea (2012) 88, 89
josephus essenes Taylor, The Essenes, the Scrolls, and the Dead Sea (2012) 88, 89
judaea, region of, and determinism Taylor, The Essenes, the Scrolls, and the Dead Sea (2012) 88, 89
judaism, second temple Taylor, The Essenes, the Scrolls, and the Dead Sea (2012) 88
judaism Wilson, Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology (2018) 19
jupiter Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 168
justin, on god Brouwer and Vimercati, Fate, Providence and Free Will: Philosophy and Religion in Dialogue in the Early Imperial Age (2020) 216
justin, on virtue (ἀρετή) Brouwer and Vimercati, Fate, Providence and Free Will: Philosophy and Religion in Dialogue in the Early Imperial Age (2020) 216
justin Brouwer and Vimercati, Fate, Providence and Free Will: Philosophy and Religion in Dialogue in the Early Imperial Age (2020) 216
klawans, j. Taylor, The Essenes, the Scrolls, and the Dead Sea (2012) 88, 89
law Maso, CIcero's Philosophy (2022) 127
maccabeus, jonathan, attack by the seleucids Taylor, The Essenes, the Scrolls, and the Dead Sea (2012) 88
maccabeus, jonathan Taylor, The Essenes, the Scrolls, and the Dead Sea (2012) 88
marcus, r. Taylor, The Essenes, the Scrolls, and the Dead Sea (2012) 89
marcus (character of div.) Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 17
mind (animus) Atkins, The Cambridge Companion to Cicero's Philosophy (2021) 143
modalities Jedan, Stoic Virtues: Chrysippus and the Religious Character of Stoic Ethics (2009) 44
necessity / necessitas / necessarium / ἀνάγκη Maso, CIcero's Philosophy (2022) 41, 97
odysseus Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 308
oenomaus of gadara Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 308
origen Wilson, Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology (2018) 19
panaetius Maso, CIcero's Philosophy (2022) 127
part of a whole (soul as, etc.) Inwood and Warren, Body and Soul in Hellenistic Philosophy (2020) 125
paul, determinism Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 308
paul, free will Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 308
pharaoh Wilson, Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology (2018) 19
pharisees, and destiny Taylor, The Essenes, the Scrolls, and the Dead Sea (2012) 88, 89
pharisees Taylor, The Essenes, the Scrolls, and the Dead Sea (2012) 88
philosopher, moral Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 308
plato Wilson, Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology (2018) 19
pleasure Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 308
plotinus Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 308
posidonius Maso, CIcero's Philosophy (2022) 41
preaching, missionary Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 308
preaching, pauline Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 308
prediction Atkins, The Cambridge Companion to Cicero's Philosophy (2021) 143
principle of bivalence Atkins, The Cambridge Companion to Cicero's Philosophy (2021) 144
probable / probability / probabilitas / πιθανόν Maso, CIcero's Philosophy (2022) 97
prophecy, essenes and' Taylor, The Essenes, the Scrolls, and the Dead Sea (2012) 89
providence, judaeo-christian type Wilson, Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology (2018) 19
providence, stoic type Wilson, Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology (2018) 19
quintus (character of div.) Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 17
random / randomness Maso, CIcero's Philosophy (2022) 41
responsibility, human Jedan, Stoic Virtues: Chrysippus and the Religious Character of Stoic Ethics (2009) 44
sadducees (tsedukim/tseduqim), josephus portrayal of Taylor, The Essenes, the Scrolls, and the Dead Sea (2012) 88, 89
sadducees (tsedukim/tseduqim) Taylor, The Essenes, the Scrolls, and the Dead Sea (2012) 88
seneca Wilson, Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology (2018) 19
slave/slavery, pauline Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 308
soul Atkins, The Cambridge Companion to Cicero's Philosophy (2021) 144; Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 168
sovereignty of god, judaeo-christian view Wilson, Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology (2018) 19
sovereignty of god Wilson, Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology (2018) 19
stilpo Maso, CIcero's Philosophy (2022) 41
stoicism, determinism Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 308
stoicism, fate Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 308
stoicism, freedom Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 308
stoicism, xi Atkins, The Cambridge Companion to Cicero's Philosophy (2021) 144
stoicism Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 17
stoics, and determinism Hankinson, Cause and Explanation in Ancient Greek Thought (1998) 255
stoics, and fate Hankinson, Cause and Explanation in Ancient Greek Thought (1998) 255
stoics, and freedom Hankinson, Cause and Explanation in Ancient Greek Thought (1998) 255
stoics Hankinson, Cause and Explanation in Ancient Greek Thought (1998) 255; Taylor, The Essenes, the Scrolls, and the Dead Sea (2012) 88, 89
swerve (atomic) Atkins, The Cambridge Companion to Cicero's Philosophy (2021) 144
sympathy / sympatheia (cosmic) Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 168
system Atkins, The Cambridge Companion to Cicero's Philosophy (2021) 143
temple Wilson, Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology (2018) 19
tertullian Wilson, Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology (2018) 19
the will Wilson, Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology (2018) 19
theory Maso, CIcero's Philosophy (2022) 97, 127
tullius cicero, m., de diuinatione Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 17
tullius cicero, q. Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 17
up to us/depending on us/in our power (ἐφ ἡμῖν), alexander of aphrodisias on Brouwer and Vimercati, Fate, Providence and Free Will: Philosophy and Religion in Dialogue in the Early Imperial Age (2020) 145
up to us/depending on us/in our power (ἐφ ἡμῖν) Brouwer and Vimercati, Fate, Providence and Free Will: Philosophy and Religion in Dialogue in the Early Imperial Age (2020) 145
virtue (ἀρετή, virtus), justin on Brouwer and Vimercati, Fate, Providence and Free Will: Philosophy and Religion in Dialogue in the Early Imperial Age (2020) 216
weakness, of god Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 308
weakness Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 308
weapon Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 308
will (voluntas) Atkins, The Cambridge Companion to Cicero's Philosophy (2021) 143, 144
wisdom / sapientia Maso, CIcero's Philosophy (2022) 97