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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



2291
Cicero, On Fate, 20-23
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

4 results
1. Aristotle, Interpretation, 9 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

2. Cicero, On Divination, 1.1 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.1. Vetus opinio est iam usque ab heroicis ducta temporibus, eaque et populi Romani et omnium gentium firmata consensu, versari quandam inter homines divinationem, quam Graeci mantikh/n appellant, id est praesensionem et scientiam rerum futurarum. Magnifica quaedam res et salutaris, si modo est ulla, quaque proxime ad deorum vim natura mortalis possit accedere. Itaque ut alia nos melius multa quam Graeci, sic huic praestantissimae rei nomen nostri a divis, Graeci, ut Plato interpretatur, a furore duxerunt. 1.1. Book I[1] There is an ancient belief, handed down to us even from mythical times and firmly established by the general agreement of the Roman people and of all nations, that divination of some kind exists among men; this the Greeks call μαντική — that is, the foresight and knowledge of future events. A really splendid and helpful thing it is — if only such a faculty exists — since by its means men may approach very near to the power of gods. And, just as we Romans have done many other things better than the Greeks, so have we excelled them in giving to this most extraordinary gift a name, which we have derived from divi, a word meaning gods, whereas, according to Platos interpretation, they have derived it from furor, a word meaning frenzy. 1.1. Why, my dear Quintus, said I, you are defending the very citadel of the Stoics in asserting the interdependence of these two propositions: if there is divination there are gods, and, if there are gods there is divination. But neither is granted as readily as you think. For it is possible that nature gives signs of future events without the intervention of a god, and it may be that there are gods without their having conferred any power of divination upon men.To this he replied, I, at any rate, find sufficient proof to satisfy me of the existence of the gods and of their concern in human affairs in my conviction that there are some kinds of divination which are clear and manifest. With your permission I will set forth my views on this subject, provided you are at leisure and have nothing else which you think should be preferred to such a discussion. 1.1. And what do you say of the following story which we find in our annals? During the Veientian War, when Lake Albanus had overflowed its banks, a certain nobleman of Veii deserted to us and said that, according to the prophecies of the Veientian books, their city could not be taken while the lake was at flood, and that if its waters were permitted to overflow and take their own course to the sea the result would be disastrous to the Roman people; on the other hand, if the waters were drained off in such a way that they did not reach the sea the result would be to our advantage. In consequence of this announcement our forefathers dug that marvellous canal to drain off the waters from the Alban lake. Later when the Veientians had grown weary of war and had sent ambassadors to the Senate to treat for peace, one of them is reported to have said that the deserter had not dared to tell the whole of the prophecy contained in the Veientian books, for those books, he said, also foretold the early capture of Rome by the Gauls. And this, as we know, did occur six years after the fall of Veii. [45]
3. Cicero, On Fate, 11-16, 21-23, 25-29, 3, 30-34, 36, 39-45, 47-48, 5-10 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4. Cicero, On The Nature of The Gods, 3.95 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3.95. I on my side," replied Cotta, "only desire to be refuted. My purpose was rather to discuss the doctrines I have expounded than to pronounce judgement upon them, and I am confident that you can easily defeat me." "Oh, no doubt," interposed Velleius; "why, he thinks that even our dreams are sent to us by Jupiter — though dreams themselves are not so unsubstantial as a Stoic disquisition on the nature of the gods." Here the conversation ended, and we parted, Velleius thinking Cotta's discourse to be the truer, while I felt that that of Balbus approximated more nearly to a semblance of the truth.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
alexander of aphrodisias Maso, CIcero's Philosophy (2022) 84
alexandria Maso, CIcero's Philosophy (2022) 84
argument Maso, CIcero's Philosophy (2022) 84
assent / adsensio / adsensus / συγκατάθεσις Maso, CIcero's Philosophy (2022) 84
atom / atomism Maso, CIcero's Philosophy (2022) 84
augustine Atkins, The Cambridge Companion to Cicero's Philosophy (2021) 262
carneades Atkins, The Cambridge Companion to Cicero's Philosophy (2021) 262
causality / causa / αἰτία Maso, CIcero's Philosophy (2022) 84
causes Atkins, The Cambridge Companion to Cicero's Philosophy (2021) 262
chrysippus Atkins, The Cambridge Companion to Cicero's Philosophy (2021) 262
clement of alexandria Maso, CIcero's Philosophy (2022) 84
compatibilism Maso, CIcero's Philosophy (2022) 84
cotta (character in de natura deorum) Atkins, The Cambridge Companion to Cicero's Philosophy (2021) 262
determinism Atkins, The Cambridge Companion to Cicero's Philosophy (2021) 262; Maso, CIcero's Philosophy (2022) 84
diodorus cronus Maso, CIcero's Philosophy (2022) 84
divination Atkins, The Cambridge Companion to Cicero's Philosophy (2021) 262
epicureanism Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 17
foreknowledge (divine) Atkins, The Cambridge Companion to Cicero's Philosophy (2021) 262
freedom (human) Atkins, The Cambridge Companion to Cicero's Philosophy (2021) 262
future Maso, CIcero's Philosophy (2022) 84
marcus (character of div.) Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 17
master argument Maso, CIcero's Philosophy (2022) 84
plutarch Maso, CIcero's Philosophy (2022) 84
prediction Atkins, The Cambridge Companion to Cicero's Philosophy (2021) 262
principle / principium / archē / ἀρχή Maso, CIcero's Philosophy (2022) 84
quintus (character of div.) Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 17
sextus empiricus Maso, CIcero's Philosophy (2022) 84
stobaeus iohannes Maso, CIcero's Philosophy (2022) 84
stoicism Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 17
swerve / deviation / clinamen / παρέγκλισις Maso, CIcero's Philosophy (2022) 84
theory Maso, CIcero's Philosophy (2022) 84
tullius cicero, m., de diuinatione Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 17
tullius cicero, q.' Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 17