Home About Network of subjects Linked subjects heatmap Book indices included Search by subject Search by reference Browse subjects Browse texts

Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



2291
Cicero, On Fate, 12-16
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

5 results
1. Cicero, On Divination, 2.90-2.91 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.90. O delirationem incredibilem! non enim omnis error stultitia dicenda est. Quibus etiam Diogenes Stoicus concedit aliquid, ut praedicere possint dumtaxat, qualis quisque natura et ad quam quisque maxume rem aptus futurus sit; cetera, quae profiteantur, negat ullo modo posse sciri; etenim geminorum formas esse similis, vitam atque fortunam plerumque disparem. Procles et Eurysthenes, Lacedaemoniorum reges, gemini fratres fuerunt. 2.91. At ii nec totidem annos vixerunt; anno enim Procli vita brevior fuit, multumque is fratri rerum gestarum gloria praestitit. At ego id ipsum, quod vir optumus, Diogenes, Chaldaeis quasi quadam praevaricatione concedit, nego posse intellegi. Etenim cum, ut ipsi dicunt, ortus nascentium luna moderetur, eaque animadvertant et notent sidera natalicia Chaldaei, quaecumque lunae iuncta videantur, oculorum fallacissimo sensu iudicant ea, quae ratione atque animo videre debebant. Docet enim ratio mathematicorum, quam istis notam esse oportebat, quanta humilitate luna feratur terram paene contingens, quantum absit a proxuma Mercurii stella, multo autem longius a Veneris, deinde alio intervallo distet a sole, cuius lumine conlustrari putatur; reliqua vero tria intervalla infinita et inmensa, a sole ad Martis, inde ad Iovis, ab eo ad Saturni stellam, inde ad caelum ipsum, quod extremum atque ultumum mundi est. 2.91. But they did not live the same number of years, for the life of Procles was shorter by a year than that of his brother and his deeds were far more glorious. But for my part I say that even this concession which our excellent friend Diogenes makes to the Chaldeans in a sort of collusive way, is in itself unintelligible. For the Chaldeans, according to their own statements, believe that a persons destiny is affected by the condition of the moon at the time of his birth, and hence they make and record their observations of the stars which anything in conjunction with the moon on his birthday. As a result, in forming their judgements, they depend on the sense of sight, which is the least trustworthy of the senses, whereas they should employ reason and intelligence. For the science of mathematics which the Chaldeans ought to know, teaches us how close the moon comes to the earth, which indeed it almost touches; how far it is from Mercury, the nearest star; how much further yet it is from Venus; and what a great interval separates it from the sun, which is supposed to give it light. The three remaining distances are beyond computation: from the Sun to Mars, from Mars to Jupiter, from Jupiter to Saturn. Then there is the distance from Saturn to the limits of heaven — the ultimate bounds of space.
2. Cicero, On Fate, 11, 13-16, 20-23, 25-29, 3, 30-34, 36, 39-45, 47-48, 5-10 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3. Clement of Alexandria, Excerpts From Theodotus, 21 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

21. The Valentinians say that the finest emanation of Wisdom is spoken of in 'He created them in the image of God, male and female created he them.' Now the males from this emanation are the 'election,' but the females are the 'calling' and they call the male beings angelic, and the females themselves, the superior seed. So also, in the case of Adam, the male remained in him but all the female seed was taken from him and became Eve, from whom the females are derived, as the males are from him. Therefore the males are drawn together with the Logos, but the females, becoming men, are united to the angels and pass into the Pleroma. Therefore the woman is said to be changed into a man, and the church hereon earth into angels.
4. Origen, Commentary On John, 13.20 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

5. Favorinus, In Aulus Gellius Noctes Atticae, 14.1.1-14.1.2, 14.1.4, 14.1.7-14.1.12, 14.1.14-14.1.19, 14.1.23, 14.1.26



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
astrology, chaldean Bowen and Rochberg, Hellenistic Astronomy: The Science in its contexts (2020) 616
astrology Bowen and Rochberg, Hellenistic Astronomy: The Science in its contexts (2020) 616; Frede and Laks, Traditions of Theology: Studies in Hellenistic Theology, its Background and Aftermath (2001) 239
astrometeorology, (changing) relationship with roman religion Green, Carthage in Virgil's Aeneid: Staging the Enemy under Augustus (2014) 89
astrometeorology, hard / strongly deterministic form of Green, Carthage in Virgil's Aeneid: Staging the Enemy under Augustus (2014) 89
astrometeorology, soft / non-deterministic form of Green, Carthage in Virgil's Aeneid: Staging the Enemy under Augustus (2014) 89
caesars comet Green, Carthage in Virgil's Aeneid: Staging the Enemy under Augustus (2014) 89
carneades Bowen and Rochberg, Hellenistic Astronomy: The Science in its contexts (2020) 616
chaldeans Frede and Laks, Traditions of Theology: Studies in Hellenistic Theology, its Background and Aftermath (2001) 239
chrysippus Bowen and Rochberg, Hellenistic Astronomy: The Science in its contexts (2020) 616; Frede and Laks, Traditions of Theology: Studies in Hellenistic Theology, its Background and Aftermath (2001) 239
cicero Bowen and Rochberg, Hellenistic Astronomy: The Science in its contexts (2020) 616; Frede and Laks, Traditions of Theology: Studies in Hellenistic Theology, its Background and Aftermath (2001) 239
cicero (m. tullius cicero) Green, Carthage in Virgil's Aeneid: Staging the Enemy under Augustus (2014) 89
conditional statement Bowen and Rochberg, Hellenistic Astronomy: The Science in its contexts (2020) 616
de fato (cicero) Green, Carthage in Virgil's Aeneid: Staging the Enemy under Augustus (2014) 89
de jato Frede and Laks, Traditions of Theology: Studies in Hellenistic Theology, its Background and Aftermath (2001) 239
diogenes of babylon Bowen and Rochberg, Hellenistic Astronomy: The Science in its contexts (2020) 616
divination Bowen and Rochberg, Hellenistic Astronomy: The Science in its contexts (2020) 616
epicureanism Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 17
favorinus Frede and Laks, Traditions of Theology: Studies in Hellenistic Theology, its Background and Aftermath (2001) 239
gnostics/gnosticism Brouwer and Vimercati, Fate, Providence and Free Will: Philosophy and Religion in Dialogue in the Early Imperial Age (2020) 191
horoscopes Bowen and Rochberg, Hellenistic Astronomy: The Science in its contexts (2020) 616
marcus (character of div.) Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 17
mathematics Bowen and Rochberg, Hellenistic Astronomy: The Science in its contexts (2020) 616
omens Bowen and Rochberg, Hellenistic Astronomy: The Science in its contexts (2020) 616
panaetius Bowen and Rochberg, Hellenistic Astronomy: The Science in its contexts (2020) 616
permission (self-) (αὐτ-ἐξουσία), valentinians on Brouwer and Vimercati, Fate, Providence and Free Will: Philosophy and Religion in Dialogue in the Early Imperial Age (2020) 191
posidonius Bowen and Rochberg, Hellenistic Astronomy: The Science in its contexts (2020) 616
predestination (προόρισις), valentinians on Brouwer and Vimercati, Fate, Providence and Free Will: Philosophy and Religion in Dialogue in the Early Imperial Age (2020) 191
quintus (character of div.) Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 17
salvation (σωτηρία), valentinian gnostics on Brouwer and Vimercati, Fate, Providence and Free Will: Philosophy and Religion in Dialogue in the Early Imperial Age (2020) 191
spirit (πνεῦμα), gnostics on Brouwer and Vimercati, Fate, Providence and Free Will: Philosophy and Religion in Dialogue in the Early Imperial Age (2020) 191
stoicism Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 17
tullius cicero, m., de diuinatione Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 17
tullius cicero, q.' Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 17
valentinians/valentinus, and christians Brouwer and Vimercati, Fate, Providence and Free Will: Philosophy and Religion in Dialogue in the Early Imperial Age (2020) 191
valentinians/valentinus, on (self-)permission (αὐτ-εξουσία) Brouwer and Vimercati, Fate, Providence and Free Will: Philosophy and Religion in Dialogue in the Early Imperial Age (2020) 191
valentinians/valentinus, on predestination (προόρισις) Brouwer and Vimercati, Fate, Providence and Free Will: Philosophy and Religion in Dialogue in the Early Imperial Age (2020) 191
valentinians/valentinus, on salvation (σωτηρία) Brouwer and Vimercati, Fate, Providence and Free Will: Philosophy and Religion in Dialogue in the Early Imperial Age (2020) 191
valentinians/valentinus Brouwer and Vimercati, Fate, Providence and Free Will: Philosophy and Religion in Dialogue in the Early Imperial Age (2020) 191
zeno of citium Bowen and Rochberg, Hellenistic Astronomy: The Science in its contexts (2020) 616