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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



2289
Cicero, On Divination, 1.5.9
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

8 results
1. Homer, Odyssey, 15.251-15.253 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

2. Xenophanes, Fragments, None (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

3. Xenophanes, Fragments, None (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

4. Xenophanes, Fragments, None (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

5. Sophocles, Oedipus The King, 299, 298 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

6. Cicero, On The Nature of The Gods, 1.3 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.3. For there are and have been philosophers who hold that the gods exercise no control over human affairs whatever. But if their opinion is the true one, how can piety, reverence or religion exist? For all these are tributes which it is our duty to render in purity and holiness to the divine powers solely on the assumption that they take notice of them, and that some service has been rendered by the immortal gods to the race of men. But if on the contrary the gods have neither the power nor the will to aid us, if they pay no heed to us at all and take no notice of our actions, if they can exercise no possible influence upon the life of men, what ground have we for rendering any sort of worship, honour or prayer to the immortal gods? Piety however, like the rest of the virtues, cannot exist in mere outward show and pretence; and, with piety, reverence and religion must likewise disappear. And when these are gone, life soon becomes a welter of disorder and confusion;
7. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 1.34.4, 6.17.6 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1.34.4. The Oropians have near the temple a spring, which they call the Spring of Amphiaraus; they neither sacrifice into it nor are wont to use it for purifications or for lustral water. But when a man has been cured of a disease through a response the custom is to throw silver and coined gold into the spring, for by this way they say that Amphiaraus rose up after he had become a god. Iophon the Cnossian, a guide, produced responses in hexameter verse, saying that Amphiaraus gave them to the Argives who were sent against Thebes . These verses unrestrainedly appealed to popular taste. Except those whom they say Apollo inspired of old none of the seers uttered oracles, but they were good at explaining dreams and interpreting the flights of birds and the entrails of victims. 6.17.6. That he was the soothsayer of the clan of the Clytidae, Eperastus declares at the end of the inscription: of the stock of the sacred-tongued Clytidae I boast to be, Their soothsayer, the scion of the god-like Melampodidae. For Mantius was a son of Melampus, the son of Amythaon, and he had a son Oicles, while Clytius was a son of Alcmaeon, the son of Amphiaraus, the son of Oicles. Clytius was the son of Alcmaeon by the daughter of Phegeus, and he migrated to Elis because he shrank from living with his mother's brothers, knowing that they had compassed the murder of Alcmaeon.
8. Augustine, The City of God, 7.17 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

7.17. And the same is true with respect to all the rest, as is true with respect to those things which I have mentioned for the sake of example. They do not explain them, but rather involve them. They rush hither and there, to this side or to that, according as they are driven by the impulse of erratic opinion; so that even Varro himself has chosen rather to doubt concerning all things, than to affirm anything. For, having written the first of the three last books concerning the certain gods, and having commenced in the second of these to speak of the uncertain gods, he says: I ought not to be censured for having stated in this book the doubtful opinions concerning the gods. For he who, when he has read them, shall think that they both ought to be, and can be, conclusively judged of, will do so himself. For my own part, I can be more easily led to doubt the things which I have written in the first book, than to attempt to reduce all the things I shall write in this one to any orderly system. Thus he makes uncertain not only that book concerning the uncertain gods, but also that other concerning the certain gods. Moreover, in that third book concerning the select gods, after having exhibited by anticipation as much of the natural theology as he deemed necessary, and when about to commence to speak of the vanities and lying insanities of the civil theology, where he was not only without the guidance of the truth of things, but was also pressed by the authority of tradition, he says: I will write in this book concerning the public gods of the Roman people, to whom they have dedicated temples, and whom they have conspicuously distinguished by many adornments; but, as Xenophon of Colophon writes, I will state what I think, not what I am prepared to maintain: it is for man to think those things, for God to know them. It is not, then, an account of things comprehended and most certainly believed which he promised, when about to write those things which were instituted by men. He only timidly promises an account of things which are but the subject of doubtful opinion. Nor, indeed, was it possible for him to affirm with the same certainty that Janus was the world, and such like things; or to discover with the same certainty such things as how Jupiter was the son of Saturn, while Saturn was made subject to him as king:- he could, I say, neither affirm nor discover such things with the same certainty with which he knew such things as that the world existed, that the heavens and earth existed, the heavens bright with stars, and the earth fertile through seeds; or with the same perfect conviction with which he believed that this universal mass of nature is governed and administered by a certain invisible and mighty force.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
alcmaeon Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 115
apollo Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 115
cicero, on divination Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 115
divination, and approximation to the divine Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 115
divination, mantic families' Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 115
divination Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 115
enlightenment Edelmann-Singer et al., Sceptic and Believer in Ancient Mediterranean Religions (2020) 78
homer, on divination Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 115
philosophy Edelmann-Singer et al., Sceptic and Believer in Ancient Mediterranean Religions (2020) 78
pindar Edelmann-Singer et al., Sceptic and Believer in Ancient Mediterranean Religions (2020) 78
stoa/stoic/stoicism Edelmann-Singer et al., Sceptic and Believer in Ancient Mediterranean Religions (2020) 78
stoicism, teiresias Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 115
xenophanes, his attitude to divine disclosure, his attitude to divine disclosure Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 115
xenophanes, on knowledge Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 115