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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



2318
Cicero, Letters To Quintus, 3.1.14
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

18 results
1. Cicero, Brutus, 24 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

24. praeclare, inquam, Brute, dicis eoque magis ista dicendi laude delector quod cetera, quae sunt quon- dam habita in civitate pulcherrima pulcherrime FOG , nemo est tam humilis qui se non aut posse adipisci aut adeptum putet; eloquentem neminem video factum esse victoria. Sed quo facilius sermo explicetur, sedentes, si videtur, agamus. Cum idem placuisset illis, tum in pratulo propter Platonis statuam con- sedimus.
2. Cicero, Brutus, 24 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

24. praeclare, inquam, Brute, dicis eoque magis ista dicendi laude delector quod cetera, quae sunt quon- dam habita in civitate pulcherrima pulcherrime FOG , nemo est tam humilis qui se non aut posse adipisci aut adeptum putet; eloquentem neminem video factum esse victoria. Sed quo facilius sermo explicetur, sedentes, si videtur, agamus. Cum idem placuisset illis, tum in pratulo propter Platonis statuam con- sedimus.
3. Cicero, De Domo Sua, 130 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

130. ego haec a Chrysogono mea sponte remoto Sex. Roscio quaero, primum qua re civis optimi bona venierint, deinde qua re hominis eius qui neque proscriptus neque proscriptus Hotoman: om. codd. neque apud adversarios occisus est bona venierint venierunt ς α ω , cum cum quin πχ1ψ in eos solos lex scripta sit, deinde qua re aliquanto post eam diem venierint quae dies in lege praefinita est, deinde deinde denique Halm cur tantulo venierint. quae omnia si, quem ad modum solent liberti nequam et improbi facere, in patronum suum voluerit conferre, nihil egerit; nemo est enim qui nesciat propter magnitudinem rerum multa multos partim improbante partim imprudente partim improbante scripsi: om. codd. : partim invito Madvig : partim conivente Ascens. (1) L. Sulla commisisse.
4. Cicero, De Oratore, 110 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

5. Cicero, Letters, 1.6, 1.9 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

6. Cicero, Letters, 1.6, 1.9 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

7. Cicero, Letters, 1.6, 1.9 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

8. Cicero, Letters To His Friends, 7.23 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

9. Cicero, Letters, 1.6, 1.9 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

10. Cicero, Orator, 110 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

11. Livy, History, 9.46.7 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

12. Juvenal, Satires, 2.4-2.5 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

13. Pliny The Elder, Natural History, 35.9 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

14. Seneca The Younger, Letters, 64.9-64.10 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

15. Suetonius, Tiberius, 70.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

16. Cassius Dio, Roman History, 43.45.3, 59.5 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

43.45.3.  Another likeness they set up in the temple of Quirinus with the inscription, "To the Invincible God," and another on the Capitol beside the former kings of Rome. 59.5. 1.  This was the kind of emperor into whose hands the Romans were then delivered. Hence the deeds of Tiberius, though they were felt to have been very harsh, were nevertheless as far superior to those of Gaius as the deeds of Augustus were to those of his successor.,2.  For Tiberius always kept the power in his own hands and used others as agents for carrying out his wishes; whereas Gaius was ruled by the charioteers and gladiators, and was the slave of the actors and others connected with the stage. Indeed, he always kept Apelles, the most famous of the tragedians of that day, with him even in public.,3.  Thus he by himself and they by themselves did without let or hindrance all that such persons would naturally dare to do when given power. Everything that pertained to their art he arranged and settled on the slightest pretext in the most lavish manner, and he compelled the praetors and the consuls to do the same, so that almost every day some performance of the kind was sure to be given.,4.  At first he was but a spectator and listener at these and would take sides for or against various performers like one of the crowd; and one time, when he was vexed with those of opposing tastes, he did not go to the spectacle. But as time went on, he came to imitate, and to contend in many events,,5.  driving chariots, fighting as a gladiator, giving exhibitions of pantomimic dancing, and acting in tragedy. So much for his regular behaviour. And once he sent an urgent summons at night to the leading men of the senate, as if for some important deliberation, and then danced before them.  
17. Pliny The Younger, Letters, 9.39, 10.8 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

9.39. To Mustius. I have been warned by the haruspices to put into better repair and enlarge the temple of Ceres, which stands on my estate, as it is very old and cramped for room, and on one day in the year attracts great crowds of people. For on the Ides of September all the population of the country-side flocks thither; much business is transacted, many vows are registered and paid, but there is no place near where people can take refuge either from storm or heat. I think, therefore, that I shall be showing my generosity, and at the same time display my piety, if I rebuild the temple as handsomely as possible and add to it a portico, the former for the use of the goddess, the latter for the people who attend there. So I should like you to buy me four columns of any kind of marble you think fit, as well as sufficient marble for the pavement and walls. I shall also have to get made or buy a statue of the goddess, for the old one, which was made of wood, has lost some of its limbs through age. As for the portico, I don't think there is anything that I need ask you for at present, unless it be that you should sketch me a plan to suit the situation of the place. The portico cannot be carried all round the temple, inasmuch as on one side of the floor of the building there is a river with very steep banks, and on the other there runs a road. Beyond the road, there is a spacious meadow which would be a very suitable place to build the portico, as it is right opposite the temple, unless you can think of a better plan - you who make a practice of overcoming natural difficulties by your professional skill. Farewell. 10.8. To Trajan. When, Sir, your late father, * both by a very fine speech and by setting them a most honourable example himself, urged every citizen to deeds of liberality, I sought permission from him to transfer to a neighbouring township all the statues of the emperors which had come into my possession by various bequests and were kept just as I had received them ill my distant estates, and to add thereto a statue of himself. He granted the request and made most flattering references to myself, and I immediately wrote to the decurions asking them to assign me a plot of ground upon which I might erect a temple ** at my own cost, and they offered to let me choose the site myself as a mark of appreciation of the task I had undertaken. But first my own ill-health, then your father's illness, and subsequently the anxieties of the office you bestowed upon me, have prevented my proceeding with the work. However, I think the present is a convenient opportunity for getting on with it, for my month of duty ends on the Kalends of September and the following month contains a number of holidays. I ask, therefore, as a special favour, that you will allow me to adorn with your statue the work which I am about to begin ; and secondly, that in order to complete it as soon as possible, you will grant me leave of absence. It would be alien to my frank disposition if I were to conceal from your goodness the fact that you will, if you grant me leave, be incidentally aiding very materially my private fices. The rent of my estates in that district exceeds 400,000 sesterces, and if the new tets are to be settled in time for the next pruning, the letting of the farms must not be any further delayed. Besides, the succession of bad vintages we have had forces me to consider the question of making certain abatements, and I cannot enter into that question unless I am on the spot. So, Sir, if for these reasons you grant me leave for thirty days, I shall owe to your kindness the speedy fulfilment of a work of loyalty and the settlement of my private fices. I cannot reduce the length of leave I ask for to narrower limits, inasmuch as the township and the estates I have spoken of are more than a hundred and fifty miles from Rome. 0
18. Pliny The Younger, Letters, 9.39, 10.8 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

9.39. To Mustius. I have been warned by the haruspices to put into better repair and enlarge the temple of Ceres, which stands on my estate, as it is very old and cramped for room, and on one day in the year attracts great crowds of people. For on the Ides of September all the population of the country-side flocks thither; much business is transacted, many vows are registered and paid, but there is no place near where people can take refuge either from storm or heat. I think, therefore, that I shall be showing my generosity, and at the same time display my piety, if I rebuild the temple as handsomely as possible and add to it a portico, the former for the use of the goddess, the latter for the people who attend there. So I should like you to buy me four columns of any kind of marble you think fit, as well as sufficient marble for the pavement and walls. I shall also have to get made or buy a statue of the goddess, for the old one, which was made of wood, has lost some of its limbs through age. As for the portico, I don't think there is anything that I need ask you for at present, unless it be that you should sketch me a plan to suit the situation of the place. The portico cannot be carried all round the temple, inasmuch as on one side of the floor of the building there is a river with very steep banks, and on the other there runs a road. Beyond the road, there is a spacious meadow which would be a very suitable place to build the portico, as it is right opposite the temple, unless you can think of a better plan - you who make a practice of overcoming natural difficulties by your professional skill. Farewell. 10.8. To Trajan. When, Sir, your late father, * both by a very fine speech and by setting them a most honourable example himself, urged every citizen to deeds of liberality, I sought permission from him to transfer to a neighbouring township all the statues of the emperors which had come into my possession by various bequests and were kept just as I had received them ill my distant estates, and to add thereto a statue of himself. He granted the request and made most flattering references to myself, and I immediately wrote to the decurions asking them to assign me a plot of ground upon which I might erect a temple ** at my own cost, and they offered to let me choose the site myself as a mark of appreciation of the task I had undertaken. But first my own ill-health, then your father's illness, and subsequently the anxieties of the office you bestowed upon me, have prevented my proceeding with the work. However, I think the present is a convenient opportunity for getting on with it, for my month of duty ends on the Kalends of September and the following month contains a number of holidays. I ask, therefore, as a special favour, that you will allow me to adorn with your statue the work which I am about to begin ; and secondly, that in order to complete it as soon as possible, you will grant me leave of absence. It would be alien to my frank disposition if I were to conceal from your goodness the fact that you will, if you grant me leave, be incidentally aiding very materially my private fices. The rent of my estates in that district exceeds 400,000 sesterces, and if the new tets are to be settled in time for the next pruning, the letting of the farms must not be any further delayed. Besides, the succession of bad vintages we have had forces me to consider the question of making certain abatements, and I cannot enter into that question unless I am on the spot. So, Sir, if for these reasons you grant me leave for thirty days, I shall owe to your kindness the speedy fulfilment of a work of loyalty and the settlement of my private fices. I cannot reduce the length of leave I ask for to narrower limits, inasmuch as the township and the estates I have spoken of are more than a hundred and fifty miles from Rome. 0


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
acilius glabrio, m., dedicates statue of his father Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 291
acilius glabrio, m., dedicates temple of pietas Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 291
aemilius lepidus, m. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 291
aeschylus (tragic poet) Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 158
aristotle, portraits of Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 158
athena Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 158
atticus (titus pomponius) Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 158
cassius longinus, c. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 291
chrysippus (philosopher), portraits of Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 158
cicero (orator and writer), villa decorations of Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 158
cicero (orator and writer) Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 158
concordia Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 291
construction, imperial oversight of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 291
construction Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 291
demosthenes (politician and orator), portraits of Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 158
education (paideia) see also philhellenism\n, in greek culture Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 158
herm / double herm Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 158
libraries, decorated with portraits' Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 158
marcius philippus, q. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 291
monster, construction of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 291
patronage Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 291
plato (philosopher), portraits of Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 158
pliny the younger Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 158
populus romanus, its role in construction Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 291
rome, forum holitorium Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 291
rome, statues of seven kings on Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 291
rome, temple of quirinus, caesars statue in Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 291
rome, temple of tellus, ciceros interest in Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 291
senate, and adulation Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 291
senate, role in construction Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 291
silius italicus (politician and poet) Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 158
sophocles (tragic poet), portraits of Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 158
sophocles (tragic poet) Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 158
tiberius (emperor) Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 158
tullius cicero, q., his statue Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 291
virgil (poet) Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 158