Home About Network of subjects Linked subjects heatmap Book indices included Search by subject Search by reference Browse subjects Browse texts

Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



2334
Cicero, In Verrem, 5.14.36
NaN


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

5 results
1. Cicero, Brutus, 58-60, 57 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

57. dicitur etiam C. Flaminius, is qui tribunus plebis legem de agro Gallico et Piceno viritim dividundo tulerit, qui consul apud Trasumennum Tarsumennum L ; cf. Quint. i. 5, 13 sit tulerit... sit L : tulit... est Schütz interfectus, ad populum valuisse dicendo. Q. etiam Maximus Verrucosus orator habitus est temporibus illis et Q. Metellus, is qui bello Punico secundo cum L. Veturio Philone consul fuit. quem vero exstet et de quo sit memoriae proditum de quo ... proditum incl. Jahn eloquen- tem fuisse et ita esse habitum, primus est M. Cornelius Cethegus, cuius eloquentiae est auctor et idoneus quidem mea sententia Q. Ennius, praesertim cum et ipse eum audi- verit et scribat de mortuo: ex quo nulla suspicio est amici tiae causa esse mentitum mentitum L : ementitum Bake .
2. Cicero, Brutus, 58-60, 57 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

57. dicitur etiam C. Flaminius, is qui tribunus plebis legem de agro Gallico et Piceno viritim dividundo tulerit, qui consul apud Trasumennum Tarsumennum L ; cf. Quint. i. 5, 13 sit tulerit... sit L : tulit... est Schütz interfectus, ad populum valuisse dicendo. Q. etiam Maximus Verrucosus orator habitus est temporibus illis et Q. Metellus, is qui bello Punico secundo cum L. Veturio Philone consul fuit. quem vero exstet et de quo sit memoriae proditum de quo ... proditum incl. Jahn eloquen- tem fuisse et ita esse habitum, primus est M. Cornelius Cethegus, cuius eloquentiae est auctor et idoneus quidem mea sententia Q. Ennius, praesertim cum et ipse eum audi- verit et scribat de mortuo: ex quo nulla suspicio est amici tiae causa esse mentitum mentitum L : ementitum Bake .
3. Cicero, Pro Rabirio Postumo, 17, 16 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4. Dionysius of Halycarnassus, Roman Antiquities, 5.17.2-5.17.6 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

5.17.2.  They were met by the senate, which had decreed a triumph in honour of their leader, and also by all the people, who received the army with bowls of wine and tables spread with viands. When they came into the city, the consul triumphed according to the custom followed by the kings when they conducted the trophy-bearing processions and the sacrifices, and having consecrated the spoils to the gods, he observed that day as sacred and gave a banquet to the most distinguished of the citizens. But on the next day he arrayed himself in dark clothing, and placing the body of Brutus, suitably adorned, upon a magnificent bier in the Forum, he called the people together in assembly, and advancing to the tribunal, delivered the funeral oration in his honour. 5.17.3.  Whether Valerius was the first who introduced this custom among the Romans or whether he found it already established by the kings and adopted it, I cannot say for certain; but I do know from my acquaintance with universal history, as handed down by the most ancient poets and the most celebrated historians, that it was an ancient custom instituted by the Romans to celebrate the virtues of illustrious men at their funerals and that the Greeks were not the authors of it. 5.17.4.  For although these writers have given accounts of funeral games, both gymnastic and equestrian, held in honour of famous men by their friends, as by Achilles for Patroclus and, before that, by Heracles for Pelops, yet none of them makes any mention of eulogies spoken over the deceased except the tragic poets at Athens, who, out of flattery to their city, invented this legend also in the case of those who were buried by Theseus. For it was only at some late period that the Athenians added to their custom the funeral oration, having instituted it either in honour of those who died in defence of their country at Artemisium, Salamis and Plataea, or on account of the deeds performed at Marathon. But even the affair at Marathon — if, indeed, the eulogies delivered in honour of the deceased really began with that occasion — was later than the funeral of Brutus by sixteen years. 5.17.5.  However, if anyone, without stopping to investigate who were the first to introduce these funeral orations, desires to consider the custom in itself and to learn in which of the two nations it is seen at its best, he will find that it is observed more wisely among the Romans than among the Athenians. For, whereas the Athenians seem to have ordained that these orations should be pronounced at the funerals of those only who have died in war, believing that one should determine who are good men solely on the basis of the valour they show at their death, even though in other respects they are without merit 5.17.6.  the Romans, on the other hand, appointed this honour to be paid to all their illustrious men, whether as commanders in war or as leaders in the civil administration they have given wise counsels and performed noble deeds, and this not alone to those who have died in war, but also to those who have met their end in any manner whatsoever, believing that good men deserve praise for every virtue they have shown during their lives and not solely for the single glory of their death.
5. Pliny The Elder, Natural History, 7.139 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aggression Papaioannou et al., Rhetoric and Religion in Ancient Greece and Rome (2021) 155; Papaioannou, Serafim and Demetriou, Rhetoric and Religion in Ancient Greece and Rome (2021) 155
compassion Papaioannou et al., Rhetoric and Religion in Ancient Greece and Rome (2021) 155; Papaioannou, Serafim and Demetriou, Rhetoric and Religion in Ancient Greece and Rome (2021) 155
culture/cultural Papaioannou et al., Rhetoric and Religion in Ancient Greece and Rome (2021) 155; Papaioannou, Serafim and Demetriou, Rhetoric and Religion in Ancient Greece and Rome (2021) 155
emotions Papaioannou et al., Rhetoric and Religion in Ancient Greece and Rome (2021) 155; Papaioannou, Serafim and Demetriou, Rhetoric and Religion in Ancient Greece and Rome (2021) 155
funeral speech Papaioannou et al., Rhetoric and Religion in Ancient Greece and Rome (2021) 155; Papaioannou, Serafim and Demetriou, Rhetoric and Religion in Ancient Greece and Rome (2021) 155
laudatio funebris Papaioannou et al., Rhetoric and Religion in Ancient Greece and Rome (2021) 155; Papaioannou, Serafim and Demetriou, Rhetoric and Religion in Ancient Greece and Rome (2021) 155
political culture' Papaioannou, Serafim and Demetriou, Rhetoric and Religion in Ancient Greece and Rome (2021) 155
political culture Papaioannou et al., Rhetoric and Religion in Ancient Greece and Rome (2021) 155