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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



2334
Cicero, In Verrem, 2.4.107


nanBut Enna, where those things which I am speaking of are said to have been done, is in a high and lofty situation, on the top of which is a large level plain, and springs of water which are never dry. And the whole of the plain is cut off and separated, so as to be difficult of approach. Around it are many lakes and groves, and beautiful flowers at every season of the year; so that the place itself appears to testify to that abduction of the virgin which we have heard of from our boyhood. 84 Near it is a cave turned towards the north, of unfathomable depth, where they say that Father Pluto suddenly rose out of the earth in his chariot, and carried the virgin off from that spot, and that on a sudden, at no great distance from Syracuse, he went down beneath the earth, and that immediately a lake sprang up in that place; and there to this day the Syracusans celebrate anniversary festivals with a most numerous assemblage of both sexes [49] On account of the antiquity of this belief, because in those places the traces and almost the cradles of those gods are found, the worship of Ceres of Enna prevails to a wonderful extent, both in private and in public over all Sicily. In truth, many prodigies often attest her influence and divine powers. Her present help is often brought to many in critical circumstances, so that this island appears not only to be loved, but also to be watched over and protected by her.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

4 results
1. Cicero, On The Nature of The Gods, 1.82 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.82. For we have often seen temples robbed and images of gods carried off from the holiest shrines by our fellow-countrymen, but no one ever even heard of an Egyptian laying profane hands on a crocodile or ibis or cat. What therefore do you infer? that the Egyptians do not believe their sacred bull Apis to be a god? Precisely as much as you believe the Saviour Juno of your native place to be a goddess. You never see her even in your dreams unless equipped with goat-skin, spear, buckler and slippers turned up at the toe. Yet that is not the aspect of the Argive Juno, nor of the Roman. It follows that Juno has one form for the Argives, another for the people of Lanuvium, and another for us. And indeed our Jupiter of the Capitol is not the same as the Africans' Juppiter Ammon.
2. Cicero, Pro Sulla, 42-44, 41 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

41. vidi ego hoc, iudices iudices vidi Ta : om. e , nisi recenti memoria senatus auctoritatem huius indici monumentis publicis testatus essem, fore ut aliquando non Torquatus neque Torquati quispiam similis—nam id me multum fefellit—sed ut aliquis patrimoni patrimonii Te, Schol. : patrimonio cett. naufragus, inimicus oti, bonorum hostis, aliter indicata indic. Ta : iudic. cett. haec esse diceret, quo facilius vento aliquo in optimum quemque excitato posset in malis rei publicae portum aliquem aliquem hoc loco hab. Tec, post malorum cett. suorum malorum invenire. itaque introductis in senatum indicibus constitui institui Schol. senatores qui omnia indicum dicta, interrogata, responsa perscriberent.
3. Diodorus Siculus, Historical Library, 5.4 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

5.4. 1.  Like the two goddesses whom we have mentioned Corê, we are told, received as her portion the meadows round about Enna; but a great fountain was made sacred to her in the territory of Syracuse and given the name Cyanê or "Azure Fount.",2.  For the myth relates that it was near Syracuse that Pluton effected the Rape of Corê and took her away in his chariot, and that after cleaving the earth asunder he himself descended into Hades, taking along with him the bride whom he had seized, and that he caused the fountain named Cyanê to gush forth, near which the Syracusans each year hold a notable festive gathering; and private individuals offer the lesser victims, but when the ceremony is on behalf of the community, bulls are plunged in the pool, this manner of sacrifice having been commanded by Heracles on the occasion when he made the circuit of all Sicily, while driving off the cattle of Geryones.,3.  After the Rape of Corê, the myth does on to recount, Demeter, being unable to find her daughter, kindled torches in the craters of Mt. Aetna and visited many parts of the inhabited world, and upon the men who received her with the greatest favour she conferred briefs, rewarding them with the gift of the fruit of the wheat.,4.  And since a more kindly welcome was extended the goddess by the Athenians than by any other people, they were the first after the Siceliotae to be given the fruit of the wheat; and in return for this gift the citizens of that city in assembly honoured the goddess above all others with the establishment both of most notable sacrifices and of the mysteries of Eleusis, which, by reason of their very great antiquity and sanctity, have come to be famous among all mankind. From the Athenians many peoples received a portion of the gracious gift of the corn, and they in turn, sharing the gift of the seed with their neighbours, in this way caused all the inhabited world to abound with it.,5.  And the inhabitants of Sicily, since by reason of the intimate relationship of Demeter and Corê with them they were the first to share in the corn after its discovery, instituted to each one of the goddesses sacrifices and festive gatherings, which they named after them, and by the time chosen for these made acknowledgement of the gifts which had been conferred upon them.,6.  In the case of Corê, for instance, they established the celebration of her return at about the time when the fruit of the corn was found to come to maturity, and they celebrate this sacrifice and festive gathering with such strictness of observance and such zeal as we should reasonably expect those men to show who are returning thanks for having been selected before all mankind for the greatest possible gift;,7.  but in the case of Demeter they preferred that time for the sacrifice when the sowing of the corn is first begun, and for a period of ten days they hold a festive gathering which bears the name of this goddess and is most magnificent by reason of the brilliance of their preparation for it, while in the observance of it they imitate the ancient manner of life. And it is their custom during these days to indulge in coarse language as they associate one with another, the reason being that by such coarseness the goddess, grieved though she was at the Rape of Corê, burst into laughter.
4. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 1.557-1.558, 1.567, 1.649, 5.415-5.416, 5.420-5.424, 6.424, 6.574-6.580 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
amplificatio, in ciceros speeches Bua, Roman Political Culture: Seven Studies of the Senate and City Councils of Italy from the First to the Sixth Century AD (2019) 277
apollo Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 68
brutus, marcus Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 252
ceres, temple of Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 252
ceres Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 252
chthonic deities Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 252
cicero, marcus tullius, on religions Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 252
cicero, master of elegantia Bua, Roman Political Culture: Seven Studies of the Senate and City Councils of Italy from the First to the Sixth Century AD (2019) 277
cicero Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 68
cotta Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 252
cyane Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 68
daphne Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 68
diodorus siculus Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 68
echo Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 68
egypt Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 252
gods, chthonic deities Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 252
gracchus, tiberius Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 252
henna Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 252
libera (proserpina) Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 252
numinousness, in foreign lands Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 252
numinousness, of divine imagery Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 252
nymphs, as rape victims Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 68
nymphs, transformation as punishment of Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 68
otis, brooks Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 68
philomela, io compared to Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 68
pluto (hades), cyane punished and transformed by Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 68
proserpina (libera) Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 252
proserpina (persephone), rape of Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 68
proserpina by Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 68
punishment, silencing or loss of speech as Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 68
punishment, transformation as Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 68
quintilian, on ciceros style Bua, Roman Political Culture: Seven Studies of the Senate and City Councils of Italy from the First to the Sixth Century AD (2019) 277
religio' Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 252
religions, roman, religious sensibilities Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 252
segal, charles Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 68
sibylline books Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 252
sicily Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 252
silence, as punishment Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 68
syria Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 252
temple of, ceres Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 252
transformations, as punishment Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 68
transformations, grief and Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 68
transformations, into water Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 68
verres, depredations of Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 252
verres Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 252
virginity or chastity, as self determination or rebellion Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 68
virginity or chastity, water linked to Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 68