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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



2334
Cicero, In Verrem, 2.2.158


nanWhat man ever lived of whom such a thing was heard as has happened to you, that his statues in his province, erected in the public places, and some of them even in the holy temples, were thrown down by force by the whole population? There have been many guilty magistrates in Asia, many in Africa, many in Spain, in Gaul, in Sardinia, many in Sicily itself, but did we ever hear such a thing as this of any of them? It is an unexampled thing, O judges, a sort of prodigy amazing the Sicilians, and among all the Greeks. I would not have believed that story about the statues, if I had not seen them myself uprooted and lying on the ground; because it is a custom among all the Greeks to think that honours paid to men by monuments of that sort, are, to some extent, consecrated, and under the protection of the gods.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

16 results
1. Homer, Odyssey, 12.212 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

2. Cicero, In Verrem, 2.2.154, 2.2.159-2.2.160 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3. Livy, History, 31.44.4-31.44.5, 31.44.9 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4. Livy, Per., 140 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

5. Lucretius Carus, On The Nature of Things, 2.1-2.6 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

6. Ovid, Tristia, 3.1.69-3.1.70 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

7. Seneca The Elder, Controversies, 8.2 (1st cent. BCE

8. Vergil, Aeneis, 1.202-1.206 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.202. till rocks and blazing torches fill the air 1.203. (rage never lacks for arms)—if haply then 1.204. ome wise man comes, whose reverend looks attest 1.205. a life to duty given, swift silence falls; 1.206. all ears are turned attentive; and he sways
9. Pliny The Elder, Natural History, 36.22, 36.27 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

10. Suetonius, Iulius, 75.4 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

11. Suetonius, Otho, 7 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

12. Tacitus, Annals, 3.76, 14.61, 16.7 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

3.76.  Junia, too, born niece to Cato, wife of Caius Cassius, sister of Marcus Brutus, looked her last on life, sixty-three full years after the field of Philippi. Her will was busily discussed by the crowd; because in disposing of her great wealth she mentioned nearly every patrician of note in complimentary terms, but omitted the Caesar. The slur was taken in good part, and he offered no objection to the celebration of her funeral with a panegyric at the Rostra and the rest of the customary ceremonies. The effigies of twenty great houses preceded her to the tomb — members of the Manlian and Quinctian families, and names of equal splendour. But Brutus and Cassius shone brighter than all by the very fact that their portraits were unseen. 14.61.  At once exulting crowds scaled the Capitol, and Heaven at last found itself blessed. They hurled down the effigies of Poppaea, they carried the statues of Octavia shoulder-high, strewed them with flowers, upraised them in the forum and the temples. Even the emperor's praises were essayed with vociferous loyalty. Already they were filling the Palace itself with their numbers and their cheers, when bands of soldiers emerged and scattered them in disorder with whipcuts and levelled weapons. All the changes effected by the outbreak were rectified, and the honours of Poppaea were reinstated. She herself, always cruel in her hatreds, and now rendered more so by her fear that either the violence of the multitude might break out in a fiercer storm or Nero follow the trend of popular feeling, threw herself at his knees:— "Her affairs," she said, "were not in a position in which she could fight for her marriage, though it was dearer to her than life: that life itself had been brought to the verge of destruction by those retainers and slaves of Octavia who had conferred on themselves the name of the people and dared in peace what would scarcely happen in war. Those arms had been lifted against the sovereign; only a leader had been lacking, and, once the movement had begun, a leader was easily come by, — the one thing necessary was an excursion from Campania, a personal visit to the capital by her whose distant nod evoked the storm! And apart from this, what was Poppaea's transgression? in what had she offended anyone? Or was the reason that she was on the point of giving an authentic heir to the hearth of the Caesars? Did the Roman nation prefer the progeny of an Egyptian flute-player to be introduced to the imperial throne? — In brief, if policy so demanded, then as an act of grace, but not of compulsion, let him send for the lady who owned him — or else take thought for his security! A deserved castigation and lenient remedies had allayed the first commotion; but let the mob once lose hope of seeing Octavia Nero's wife and they would soon provide her with a husband! 16.7.  To the death of Poppaea, outwardly regretted, but welcome to all who remembered her profligacy and cruelty, Nero added a fresh measure of odium by prohibiting Gaius Cassius from attendance at the funeral. It was the first hint of mischief. Nor was the mischief long delayed. Silanus was associated with him; their only crime being that Cassius was eminent for a great hereditary fortune and an austere character, Silanus for a noble lineage and a temperate youth. Accordingly, the emperor sent a speech to the senate, arguing that both should be removed from public life, and objecting to the former that, among his other ancestral effigies, he had honoured a bust of Gaius Cassius, inscribed:— "To the leader of the cause." The seeds of civil war, and revolt from the house of the Caesars, — such were the objects he had pursued. And, not to rely merely on the memory of a hated name as an incentive to faction, he had taken to himself a partner in Lucius Silanus, a youth of noble family and headstrong temper, who was to be his figure-head for a revolution.
13. Tacitus, Histories, 1.78 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1.78.  With the same generosity Otho tried to win over the support of communities and provinces. To the colonies of Hispalis and Emerita he sent additional families. To the whole people of the Lingones he gave Roman citizenship and presented the province Baetica with towns in Mauritania. New constitutions were given Cappadocia and Africa, more for display than to the lasting advantage of the provinces. Even while engaged in these acts, which found their excuse in the necessity of the situation and the anxieties that were forced upon him, he did not forget his loves and had the statues of Poppaea replaced by a vote of the senate. It was believed that he also brought up the question of celebrating Nero's memory with the hope of winning over the Roman people; and in fact some set up statues of Nero; moreover on certain days the people and soldiers, as if adding thereby to Otho's nobility and distinction, acclaimed him as Nero Otho; he himself remained undecided, from fear to forbid or shame to acknowledge the title.
14. Pliny The Younger, Letters, 1.17, 3.6, 3.7.8 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1.17. To Cornelius Titianus. Faith and loyalty are not yet extinct among men 0 3.6. To Annius Severus, Out of a legacy which I have come in for I have just bought a Corinthian bronze, small it is true, but a charming and sharply-cut piece of work, so far as I have any knowledge of art, and that, as in everything else perhaps, is very slight. But as for the statue in question even I can appreciate its merits. For it is a nude, and neither conceals its faults, if there are any, nor hides at all its strong points. It represents an old man in a standing posture; the bones, muscles, nerves, veins, and even the wrinkles appear quite life-like; the hair is thin and scanty on the forehead; the brow is broad; the face wizened; the neck thin; the shoulders are bowed; the breast is flat, and the belly hollow. The back too gives the same impression of age, as far as a back view can. The bronze itself, judging by the genuine colour, is old and of great antiquity. In fact, in every respect it is a work calculated to catch the eye of a connoisseur and to delight the eye of an amateur, and this is what tempted me to purchase it, although I am the merest novice. But I bought it not to keep it at home - for as yet I have no Corinthian art work in my house - but that I might put it up in my native country in some frequented place, and I specially had in mind the Temple of Jupiter. For the statue seems to me to be worthy of the temple, and the gift to be worthy of the god. So I hope that you will show me your usual kindness when I give you a commission, and that you will undertake the following for me. Will you order a pedestal to be made, of any marble you like, to be inscribed with my name and titles, if you think the latter ought to be mentioned? I will send you the statue as soon as I can find anyone who is not overburdened with luggage, or I will bring myself along with it, as I dare say you would prefer me to do. For, if only my duties allow me, I am intending to run down thither. You are glad that I promise to come, but you will frown when I add that I can only stay a few days. For the business which hitherto has kept me from getting away will not allow of my being absent any longer. Farewell.
15. Pliny The Younger, Letters, 1.17, 3.6, 3.7.8 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1.17. To Cornelius Titianus. Faith and loyalty are not yet extinct among men 0 3.6. To Annius Severus, Out of a legacy which I have come in for I have just bought a Corinthian bronze, small it is true, but a charming and sharply-cut piece of work, so far as I have any knowledge of art, and that, as in everything else perhaps, is very slight. But as for the statue in question even I can appreciate its merits. For it is a nude, and neither conceals its faults, if there are any, nor hides at all its strong points. It represents an old man in a standing posture; the bones, muscles, nerves, veins, and even the wrinkles appear quite life-like; the hair is thin and scanty on the forehead; the brow is broad; the face wizened; the neck thin; the shoulders are bowed; the breast is flat, and the belly hollow. The back too gives the same impression of age, as far as a back view can. The bronze itself, judging by the genuine colour, is old and of great antiquity. In fact, in every respect it is a work calculated to catch the eye of a connoisseur and to delight the eye of an amateur, and this is what tempted me to purchase it, although I am the merest novice. But I bought it not to keep it at home - for as yet I have no Corinthian art work in my house - but that I might put it up in my native country in some frequented place, and I specially had in mind the Temple of Jupiter. For the statue seems to me to be worthy of the temple, and the gift to be worthy of the god. So I hope that you will show me your usual kindness when I give you a commission, and that you will undertake the following for me. Will you order a pedestal to be made, of any marble you like, to be inscribed with my name and titles, if you think the latter ought to be mentioned? I will send you the statue as soon as I can find anyone who is not overburdened with luggage, or I will bring myself along with it, as I dare say you would prefer me to do. For, if only my duties allow me, I am intending to run down thither. You are glad that I promise to come, but you will frown when I add that I can only stay a few days. For the business which hitherto has kept me from getting away will not allow of my being absent any longer. Farewell.
16. Pliny The Younger, Panegyric, 52.4 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
adulation Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 92
aemilius lepidus, m. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 92
ancestors Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 92
augustus, deification Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 92
authentic versus copy, and pleasure Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108
belief, fama Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 92
cassius longinus, c., image venerated Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108
cassius longinus, c. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108
catilinarian conspiracy Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 47
clodius Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 47
cornelius scipio africanus, p., image in temple of jupiter capitolinus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108
debates Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 92
deification, ascent to heavens Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 92
dius fidius, temple of Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 47
divine honours Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 92
divine support Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 92
domitian Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 47
doubt Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 92
elsner, j. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 92
fasti antiates maiores Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 92
favro, d. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 92
foreign customs Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 92
hannibal Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108
impietas against, veneration of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108
impietas against, viewer response to Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108
julius caesar, assassination Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 47
julius caesar, c., image in jupiter capitolinus temple Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108
julius caesar, monumental architecture Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 47
junia tertulla Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108
junius brutus, m., image venerated Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108
lararium Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108
leontini Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 92, 108
lepidus Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 47
museum, proper behaviour in Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 92
nero (emperor) Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 47
objects, sacralized Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 92
octavia (neros wife) Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 47
otho, emperor Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 47
phidias, and olympian zeus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108
philip v of macedon Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 47
pliny the elder Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 92
pliny the younger, and comum Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 92
plutarch, on divine nature of statuary Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108
pompey (the great), triumphs and honours Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 47
poppaea Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 47
rationalising Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 92
rome, temple of jupiter capitolinus, scipios statue in Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108
rome, temple of jupiter capitolinus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108
romulus Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 92
rostra Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 47
scepticism Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 92
sejanus Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 47
silius italicus, venerates vergils image Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108
statuary, miraculous properties of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108
statuary, sacred nature of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108
statues, as yardstick of fame Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 47
statues, imperial Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 47
stewart, p. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 92
style Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 92
sulla Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 47
syracuse Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108
tarquin Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 47
tauromenium Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 92, 108
temple of, dius fidius Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 47
temples, as display expenditure' Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 47
titinius capito, cn., venerates brutus and cassius images Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108
tullius cicero, m., on sacred nature of statuary Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108
tyndaris Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 92, 108
varros antiquitates rerum divinarum et humanarum Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 92
venus Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 92
vergil, image venerated Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108
verres, c., and the verralia Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108
verres, c., cicero prosecutes Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108
verres, c., public statue of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108
verres, c., statues overturned Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108
verres Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 47
viewers, shared values of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108
zeus, olympian Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108