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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



2331
Cicero, In Pisonem, 26


nan[62] O thou darkness, thou filth, thou disgrace! O thou forgetful of your father's family, scarcely mindful of your mother's, — there is actually something so broken-down, so mean, so base, so sordid, even too low to be considered worthy of the Milanese crier, your grandfather. Lucius Crassus, the wisest man of our state, searched almost the whole Alps with javelins to find out some pretext for a triumph where there was no enemy. A man of the highest genius, Caius Cotta, burnt with the same desire, though he could find no regular enemy. Neither of them had a triumph, because his colleague deprived one of that honour, and death prevented the other from enjoying it. A little while ago, you derided Marcus Piso's desire for a triumph, from which you said that you yourself were far removed; for he, even if it was not a very important war which he had conducted, as you say that it was not, still did not think that an honour to be slighted. But you are more learned than Piso, more wise than Cotta. Richer in prudence, and genius, and wisdom than Crassus, you despise those things which those idiots, as you term them, have considered glorious: [63] and if you blame them for having been covetous of glory, though they had conducted wars which were insignificant, or no wars at all; surely, you who have subdued such mighty nations, and performed such great achievements, were not bound to despise the fruit of your labours, the reward of your dangers, the tokens of your valour. And the truth is that you did not despise them, even though you may be wiser than Themista; but you shrank from exposing even your iron countenance to be chastised by the reproaches of the senate. You see now, since I have been so much an enemy to myself as to compare myself to you, that my departure, and my absence, and my return, were all so far superior to yours, that all these circumstances have shed immortal glory on me, and have inflicted everlasting infamy on you. [64] To come even to our present daily regular manner of life in this city will you venture to prefer your respectability, your influence, your reputation at home, your energy in the forum, your counsel, your assistance your authority and your opinion as a senator, to that which belongs to us or I would rather say to even the lowest and most desperate of men?


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

9 results
1. Aeschylus, Eumenides, 283, 282 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

282. ποταίνιον γὰρ ὂν πρὸς ἑστίᾳ θεοῦ
2. Cicero, In Pisonem, 47 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3. Cicero, In Verrem, 2.4.53 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4. Cicero, Post Reditum In Senatu, 7 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

7. quo quidem tempore, cum is excessisset qui caedi et flammae vobis auctoribus restiterat, cum ferro et facibus homines tota urbe volitantis, magistratuum tecta impugnata, deorum templa inflammata, summi viri et clarissimi consulis fascis fractos, fortissimi atque optimi tribuni plebis sanctissimum corpus non tactum ac violatum manu sed vulneratum ferro confectumque vidistis. qua strage non nulli permoti magistratus partim metu mortis, partim desperatione rei publicae paululum a mea causa recesserunt: reliqui fuerunt quos neque terror nec vis, nec spes nec metus, nec promissa nec minae, nec tela nec faces a vestra auctoritate, a populi Romani dignitate, a mea salute depellerent.
5. Cicero, Pro Milone, 91 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

6. Cicero, Pro Sestio, 95 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

7. Cicero, Pro Sulla, 76 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

76. nolite, iudices, arbitrari hominum illum impetum et conatum fuisse—neque enim ulla gens tam barbara aut tam immanis umquam fuit in qua non modo tot, sed unus tam crudelis hostis patriae sit inventus—, beluae quaedam illae ex portentis immanes ac ferae forma formas π hominum indutae exstiterunt. perspicite etiam atque etiam, iudices,—nihil enim est quod in hac causa dici possit possit π b χς : posset cett. vehementius— penitus introspicite Catilinae, Autroni, Cethegi, Lentuli ceterorumque mentis; quas vos in his libidines, quae flagitia, quas turpitudines, quantas audacias, quam incredibilis furores, quas notas facinorum, quae indicia parricidiorum, quantos acervos scelerum facinorum ... scelerum T : scelerum ... facinorum cett. reperietis! ex magnis et diuturnis et iam desperatis rei publicae morbis ista repente vis erupit, ut ea confecta et eiecta convalescere aliquando et sanari civitas posset posset k, Ernesti : possit cett. ; neque enim est quisquam qui arbitretur illis inclusis in re publica pestibus diutius haec haec hoc imperium c2 stare potuisse. itaque eos non ad perficiendum scelus, sed ad luendas rei publicae poenas Furiae quaedam incitaverunt.
8. Livy, History, 26.9.7, 39.32.10 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

9. Vergil, Aeneis, 7.324 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

7.324. his daughter dear. He argues in his mind


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aeneas Duffalo, The Ghosts of the Past: Latin Literature, the Dead, and Rome's Transition to a Principate (2006) 51
aeschylus Duffalo, The Ghosts of the Past: Latin Literature, the Dead, and Rome's Transition to a Principate (2006) 45
allecto Duffalo, The Ghosts of the Past: Latin Literature, the Dead, and Rome's Transition to a Principate (2006) 51
ambitio (canvassing) Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 160
athamas Duffalo, The Ghosts of the Past: Latin Literature, the Dead, and Rome's Transition to a Principate (2006) 45
augustus Duffalo, The Ghosts of the Past: Latin Literature, the Dead, and Rome's Transition to a Principate (2006) 51
brutus, marcus Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 160
calpurnius piso caesoninus, l. Duffalo, The Ghosts of the Past: Latin Literature, the Dead, and Rome's Transition to a Principate (2006) 45
canvassing (ambitio) Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 160
castor and pollux, temple of Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 160
catalinarian conspiracy Duffalo, The Ghosts of the Past: Latin Literature, the Dead, and Rome's Transition to a Principate (2006) 45
cicero, condemnation of p. clodius pulcher Duffalo, The Ghosts of the Past: Latin Literature, the Dead, and Rome's Transition to a Principate (2006) 45
cicero, in pisonem Duffalo, The Ghosts of the Past: Latin Literature, the Dead, and Rome's Transition to a Principate (2006) 45
cicero, pro sulla Duffalo, The Ghosts of the Past: Latin Literature, the Dead, and Rome's Transition to a Principate (2006) 45
cicero, references to the furies Duffalo, The Ghosts of the Past: Latin Literature, the Dead, and Rome's Transition to a Principate (2006) 45, 51
civil war Duffalo, The Ghosts of the Past: Latin Literature, the Dead, and Rome's Transition to a Principate (2006) 51
claudius, appius Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 160
clodius Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 160
clodius pulcher, p. Duffalo, The Ghosts of the Past: Latin Literature, the Dead, and Rome's Transition to a Principate (2006) 45, 51
concursus (running together) Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 160
curia (senate-house), during civil unrest Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 160
female spheres of activity Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 160
forum, crowds in Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 160
forum, during civil unrest Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 160
forum, male and female spheres of activity Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 160
forum, political dimensions Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 160
furies Duffalo, The Ghosts of the Past: Latin Literature, the Dead, and Rome's Transition to a Principate (2006) 45, 51
haluntium Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 160
horace, epodes Duffalo, The Ghosts of the Past: Latin Literature, the Dead, and Rome's Transition to a Principate (2006) 51
horace, satires Duffalo, The Ghosts of the Past: Latin Literature, the Dead, and Rome's Transition to a Principate (2006) 51
lucan Duffalo, The Ghosts of the Past: Latin Literature, the Dead, and Rome's Transition to a Principate (2006) 51
male spheres of activity Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 160
movement in the city, during civil unrest Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 160
movement in the city, language of Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 160
movement in the city, walking and running Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 160
movement in the city, women Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 160
movement in the city Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 160
orestes Duffalo, The Ghosts of the Past: Latin Literature, the Dead, and Rome's Transition to a Principate (2006) 45
piso, lucius calpurnius Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 160
prensare (to keep grasping) Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 160
prisons Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 160
running Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 160
sergius catalina, l. Duffalo, The Ghosts of the Past: Latin Literature, the Dead, and Rome's Transition to a Principate (2006) 45, 51
sounds of the city Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 160
tragedy Duffalo, The Ghosts of the Past: Latin Literature, the Dead, and Rome's Transition to a Principate (2006) 51
vergil, civil war Duffalo, The Ghosts of the Past: Latin Literature, the Dead, and Rome's Transition to a Principate (2006) 51
verginia Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 160
virginia Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 160
volitare (to flit)' Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 160
witches Duffalo, The Ghosts of the Past: Latin Literature, the Dead, and Rome's Transition to a Principate (2006) 51
women, movement through the city Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 160
women, sounds of Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 160
women, visibility of Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 160