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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



2329
Cicero, In Catilinam, 1.2


nan[4] The senate once passed a decree that Lucius Opimius, the consul, should take care that the republic suffered no injury. Not one night elapsed. There was put to death, on some mere suspicion of disaffection, Caius Gracchus, a man whose family had borne the most unblemished reputation for many generations. There was slain Marcus Fulvius, a man of consular rank, and all his children. By a like decree of the senate the safety of the republic was entrusted to Caius Marius and Lucius Valerius, the consuls. Did not the vengeance of the republic, did not execution overtake Lucius Saturninus, a tribune of the people, and Caius Servilius, the praetor, without the delay of one single day? But we, for these twenty days have been allowing the edge of the senate's authority to grow blunt, as it were. For we are in possession of a similar decree of the senate, but we keep it locked up in its parchment — buried, I may say, in the sheath; and according to this decree you ought, O Catiline, to be put to death this instant. You live, — and you live, not to lay aside, but to persist in your audacity.I wish, O conscript fathers, to be merciful; I wish not to appear negligent amid such danger to the state; but I do now accuse myself of remissness and culpable inactivity. [5] A camp is pitched in Italy, at the entrance of Etruria, in hostility to the republic; the number of the enemy increases every day; and yet the general of that camp, the leader of those enemies, we see within the walls — yes, and even in the senate, — planning every day some internal injury to the republic. If, O Catiline, I should now order you to be arrested, to be put to death, I should, I suppose, have to fear lest all good men should say that I had acted tardily, rather than that any one should affirm that I acted cruelly. But yet this, which ought to have been done long since, I have good reason for not doing as yet; I will put you to death, then, when there shall be not one person possible to be found so wicked, so abandoned, so like yourself, as not to allow that it has been rightly done. [6] As long as one person exists who can dare to defend you, yet shall live; but you shall live as you do now, surrounded by my many and trusty guards, so that you shall not be able to stir one finger against the republic: many eyes and ears shall still observe and watch you, as they have hitherto done, though you shall not perceive them.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

3 results
1. Cicero, In Catilinam, 1.22, 1.31, 1.33, 4.3 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2. Cicero, Pro Sestio, 135 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3. Cicero, Pro Sulla, 76 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

76. nolite, iudices, arbitrari hominum illum impetum et conatum fuisse—neque enim ulla gens tam barbara aut tam immanis umquam fuit in qua non modo tot, sed unus tam crudelis hostis patriae sit inventus—, beluae quaedam illae ex portentis immanes ac ferae forma formas π hominum indutae exstiterunt. perspicite etiam atque etiam, iudices,—nihil enim est quod in hac causa dici possit possit π b χς : posset cett. vehementius— penitus introspicite Catilinae, Autroni, Cethegi, Lentuli ceterorumque mentis; quas vos in his libidines, quae flagitia, quas turpitudines, quantas audacias, quam incredibilis furores, quas notas facinorum, quae indicia parricidiorum, quantos acervos scelerum facinorum ... scelerum T : scelerum ... facinorum cett. reperietis! ex magnis et diuturnis et iam desperatis rei publicae morbis ista repente vis erupit, ut ea confecta et eiecta convalescere aliquando et sanari civitas posset posset k, Ernesti : possit cett. ; neque enim est quisquam qui arbitretur illis inclusis in re publica pestibus diutius haec haec hoc imperium c2 stare potuisse. itaque eos non ad perficiendum scelus, sed ad luendas rei publicae poenas Furiae quaedam incitaverunt.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
cicero, master of elegantia Bua, Roman Political Culture: Seven Studies of the Senate and City Councils of Italy from the First to the Sixth Century AD (2019) 280
disease, late-republican imagery of Walters, Imagery of the Body Politic in Ciceronian Rome (2020) 31
figurae, in ciceros speeches' Bua, Roman Political Culture: Seven Studies of the Senate and City Councils of Italy from the First to the Sixth Century AD (2019) 280
pestis Walters, Imagery of the Body Politic in Ciceronian Rome (2020) 31
purges Walters, Imagery of the Body Politic in Ciceronian Rome (2020) 31
sergius catilina, l. (catiline), as pestilence and disease Walters, Imagery of the Body Politic in Ciceronian Rome (2020) 31
tullius cicero, m. (cicero), attacks on catiline as disease Walters, Imagery of the Body Politic in Ciceronian Rome (2020) 31
tullius cicero, m. (cicero), disease imagery (in general) Walters, Imagery of the Body Politic in Ciceronian Rome (2020) 31