Home About Network of subjects Linked subjects heatmap Book indices included Search by subject Search by reference Browse subjects Browse texts

Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



2303
Cicero, De Oratore, 3.220


Omnis autem hos motus subsequi debet gestus, non hic verba exprimens scaenicus, sed universam rem et sententiam non demonstratione, sed significatione declarans, laterum inflexione hac forti ac virili, non ab scaena et histrionibus, sed ab armis aut etiam a palaestra; manus autem minus arguta, digitis subsequens verba, non exprimens; bracchium procerius proiectum quasi quoddam telum orationis; supplosio pedis in contentionibus aut incipiendis aut finiendis.“On all those emotions a proper gesture ought to attend; not the gesture of the stage, expressive of mere words, but one showing the whole force and meaning of a passage, not by gesticulation, but by emphatic delivery, by a strong and manly exertion of the lungs, not imitated from the theatre and the players, but rather from the camp and the palaestra. The action of the hand should not be too affected, but following the words rather than, as it were, expressing them by mimicry; the arm should be considerably extended, as one of the weapons of oratory; the stamping of the foot should be used only in the most vehement efforts, at their commencement or conclusion.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

3 results
1. Cicero, Orator, 56-60, 55 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2. Quintilian, Institutes of Oratory, 1.10.31, 1.11.1-1.11.2, 2.5.10, 10.1.105, 11.3.19, 11.3.128 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

1.10.31.  It will, however, I think be sufficiently clear from the examples I have already quoted, what I regard as the value and the sphere of music in the training of an orator. Still I think I ought to be more emphatic than I have been in stating that the music which I desire to see taught is not our modern music, which has been emasculated by the lascivious melodies of our effeminate stage and has to no small extent destroyed such manly vigour as we still possessed. No, I refer to the music of old which was employed to sing the praises of brave men and was sung by the brave themselves. I will have none of your psalteries and viols, that are unfit even for the use of a modest girl. Give me the knowledge of the principles of music, which have power to excite or assuage the emotions of mankind. 1.11.1.  The comic actor will also claim a certain amount of our attention, but only in so far as our future orator must be a master of the art of delivery. For I do not of course wish the boy, whom we are training to this end, to talk with the shrillness of a woman or in the tremulous accents of old age. 1.11.2.  Nor for that matter must he ape the vices of the drunkard, or copy the cringing manners of a slave, or learn to express the emotions of love, avarice or fear. Such accomplishments are not necessary to an orator and corrupt the mind, especially while it is still pliable and unformed. 2.5.10.  It will even at times be of value to read speeches which are corrupt and faulty in style, but still meet with general admiration thanks to the perversity of modern tastes, and to point out how many expressions in them are inappropriate, obscure, high-flown, grovelling, mean, extravagant or effeminate, although they are not merely praised by the majority of critics, but, worse still, praised just because they are bad. 11.3.19.  The good qualities of the voice, like everything else, are improved by training and impaired by neglect. But the training required by the orator is not the same as that which is practised by the singing-master, although the two methods may have many points in common. In both cases physical robustness is essential to save the voice from dwindling to the feeble shrillness that characterises the voices of eunuchs, women and invalids, and the mentions for creating such robustness are to be found in walking, rubbing-down with oil, abstinence from sexual intercourse, an easy digestion, and, in a word, in the simple life. 11.3.128.  Stamping the foot is, as Cicero says, effective when done on suitable occasions, that is to say, at the commencement or close of a lively argument, but if it be frequently indulged in, it brands the speaker as a fool and ceases to attract the attention of the judge. There is also the unsightly habit of swaying to right and left, and shifting the weight from one foot to the other. Above all, we must avoid effeminate movements, such as Cicero ascribes to Titius, a circumstance which led to a certain kind of dance being nicknamed Titius.
3. Quintilian, Institutio Oratoria, 1.10.31, 1.11.1-1.11.2 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

1.10.31.  It will, however, I think be sufficiently clear from the examples I have already quoted, what I regard as the value and the sphere of music in the training of an orator. Still I think I ought to be more emphatic than I have been in stating that the music which I desire to see taught is not our modern music, which has been emasculated by the lascivious melodies of our effeminate stage and has to no small extent destroyed such manly vigour as we still possessed. No, I refer to the music of old which was employed to sing the praises of brave men and was sung by the brave themselves. I will have none of your psalteries and viols, that are unfit even for the use of a modest girl. Give me the knowledge of the principles of music, which have power to excite or assuage the emotions of mankind. 1.11.1.  The comic actor will also claim a certain amount of our attention, but only in so far as our future orator must be a master of the art of delivery. For I do not of course wish the boy, whom we are training to this end, to talk with the shrillness of a woman or in the tremulous accents of old age. 1.11.2.  Nor for that matter must he ape the vices of the drunkard, or copy the cringing manners of a slave, or learn to express the emotions of love, avarice or fear. Such accomplishments are not necessary to an orator and corrupt the mind, especially while it is still pliable and unformed.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
apuleius Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 248
bearing Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 248
class status Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 248
dignitas (dignity) Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 248
dress, elite Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 248
dress, imperial Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 248
dress, masculine Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 248
dress, orators Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 248
dress, ordinary Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 248
dress, philosophers Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 248
effeminacy Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 248
etruscan Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 248
eunuchs Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 248
gender Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 248
greeks Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 248
identity Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 248
law courts Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 248
masculinity Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 248
morality Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 248
north africa, roman Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 248
orator/orateur Fleury and Schmidt, Perceptions of the Second Sophistic and Its Times - Regards sur la Seconde Sophistique et son époque(2010) 166
philosophers Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 248
plutarchus Fleury and Schmidt, Perceptions of the Second Sophistic and Its Times - Regards sur la Seconde Sophistique et son époque(2010) 166
poetry' Fleury and Schmidt, Perceptions of the Second Sophistic and Its Times - Regards sur la Seconde Sophistique et son époque(2010) 166
portraits, principate Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 248
quintilian Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 248
self-fashioning Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 248
slaves Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 248
tullius Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 248
widows Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 248