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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



2195
Catullus, Poems, 63


nanO'er high deep seas in speedy ship his voyage Atys sped,Until he trod the Phrygian grove with hurried eager tread,And as the gloomy tree-shorn stead, the she-god's home, he sought,There sorely stung with fiery ire and madman's vaguing thought,,Share he with sharpened flint the freight wherewith his form was fraught.,Then as the she-he sensed limbs were void of manly strain,And sighted freshly shed a-ground spot of ensanguined stain,,Snatched she the timbrel's legier load with hands as snowdrops white,,Thy timbrel, Mother Cybele, the firstings of thy rite,,And as her tender finger-tips on bull-back hollow rang,She rose a-grieving and her song to listening comrades sang.,"Up Gallae, hie together, haste for Cybele's deep grove,,Hie to the Dindymnean dame, ye flocks that love to rove;,The which affecting stranger steads as bound in exile's brunt,My sect pursuing led by me have nerved you to confront,The raging surge of salty sea and ocean's tyrant hand,As your hate of Venus ' hest your manly forms unmann'd,,Gladden your souls, ye mistresses, with sense of error bann'd.,Drive from your spirits dull delay, together follow ye,To hold of Phrygian goddess, home of Phrygian Cybebe,,Where loud the cymbal's voice resounds with timbrel-echoes blending,,And where the Phrygian piper drones grave bass from reed a-bending,,Where toss their ivy-circled heads with might the Maenades,Where ply mid shrilly lullilooes the holiest mysteries,,Where to fly here and there be wont the she-god's vaguing train,,Thither behoves us lead the dance in quick-step hasty strain.",Soon as had Atys (bastard-she) this lay to comrades sung,The Chorus sudden lulliloos with quivering, quavering tongue,,Again the nimble timbrel groans, the scooped-out cymbals clash,,And up green Ida flits the Choir, with footsteps hurrying rash,Then Atys frantic, panting, raves, a-wandering, lost, insane,,And leads with timbrel hent and treads the shades where shadows rain,,Like heifer spurning load of yoke in yet unbroken pride;,And the swift Gallae follow fain their first and fleet-foot guide.,But when the home of Cybele they make with toil out-worn,O'er much, they lay them down to sleep and gifts of Ceres scorn;,Till heavy slumbers seal their eyelids langourous, drooping lowly,,And raving frenzy flies each brain departing softly, slowly.,But when Dan Sol with radiant eyes that fire his face of gold,Surveyed white aether and solid soil and waters uncontrol'd,,And chased with steeds sonorous-hooved the shades of lingering night,,Then sleep from waking Atys fled fleeting with sudden flight,,By Nymph Pasithae welcomed to palpitating breast.,Thus when his frenzy raging rash was soothed to gentlest rest,,Atys revolved deeds lately done, as thought from breast unfolding,,And what he'd lost and what he was with lucid sprite beholding,,To shallows led by surging soul again the way 'gan take.,There casting glance of weeping eyes where vasty billows brake,,Sad-voiced in pitifullest lay his native land bespake.,"Country of me, Creatress mine, born to thee and bred,,By hapless me abandoned as by thrall from lordling fled,,When me to Ida's groves and glades these vaguing footsteps bore,To tarry 'mid the snows and where lurk beasts in antres frore,And seek the deeply hidden lairs where furious ferals meet!,Where, Country! whither placed must I now hold thy site and seat?,Lief would these balls of eyes direct to thee their line of sight,,Which for a while, a little while, would free me from despite.,Must I for ever roam these groves from house and home afar?,Of country, parents, kith and kin (life's boon) myself debar?,Fly Forum, fly Palestra, fly the Stadium, the Gymnase?,Wretch, ah poor wretch, I'm doomed (my soul!) to mourn throughout my days,,For what of form or figure is, which I failed to enjoy?,I full-grown man, I blooming youth, I stripling, I a boy,,I of Gymnasium erst the bloom, I too of oil the pride:,Warm was my threshold, ever stood my gateways opening wide,,My house was ever garlanded and hung with flowery freight,,And couch to quit with rising sun, has ever been my fate:,Now must I Cybele's she-slave, priestess of gods, be hight?,I Maenad I, mere bit of self, I neutral barren wight?,I spend my life-tide couch't beneath high-towering Phrygian peaks?,I dwell on Ida's verdant slopes mottled with snowy streaks,,Where homes the forest-haunting doe, where roams the wildling boar?,Now, now I rue my deed foredone, now, now it irks me sore!",Whenas from out those roseate lips these accents rapid flew,,Bore them to ears divine consigned a Nuncio true and new;,Then Cybele her lions twain disjoining from their yoke,The left-hand enemy of the herds a-goading thus bespoke:,"Up feral fell! up, hie with him, see rage his foot-steps urge,,See that his fury smite him till he seek the forest verge,,He who with over-freedom fain would fly mine empery.,Go, slash thy flank with lashing tail and sense the strokes of thee,,Make the whole mountain to thy roar sound and resound again,,And fiercely toss thy brawny neck that bears the tawny mane!",So quoth an angered Cybele, and yoke with hand untied:,The feral rose in fiery wrath and self-inciting hied,,A-charging, roaring through the brake with breaking paws he tore.,But when he reached the humid sands where surges cream the shore,,Spying soft Atys lingering near the marbled pave of sea,He springs: the terror-madded wretch back to the wood doth flee,,Where for the remnant of her days a bondmaid's life led she.,Great Goddess, Goddess Cybele, Dindymus dame divine,,Far from my house and home thy wrath and wrack, dread mistress mine:,Goad others on with Fury's goad, others to Ire consign!


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

18 results
1. Plautus, Poenulus, 1309-1314, 1317-1318, 1305 (3rd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

2. Catullus, Poems, 63.5, 63.63, 63.69 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3. Dionysius of Halycarnassus, Roman Antiquities, 2.19 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.19. 1.  Indeed, there is no tradition among the Romans either of Caelus being castrated by his own sons or of Saturn destroying his own offspring to secure himself from their attempts or of Jupiter dethroning Saturn and confining his own father in the dungeon of Tartarus, or, indeed, of wars, wounds, or bonds of the gods, or of their servitude among men.,2.  And no festival is observed among them as a day of mourning or by the wearing of black garments and the beating of breasts and the lamentations of women because of the disappearance of deities, such as the Greeks perform in commemorating the rape of Persephonê and the adventures of Dionysus and all the other things of like nature. And one will see among them, even though their manners are now corrupted, no ecstatic transports, no Corybantic frenzies, no begging under the colour of religion, no bacchanals or secret mysteries, no all-night vigils of men and women together in the temples, nor any other mummery of this kind; but alike in all their words and actions with respect to the gods a reverence is shown such as is seen among neither Greeks nor barbarians.,3.  And, — the thing which I myself have marvelled at most, — notwithstanding the influx into Rome of innumerable nations which are under every necessity of worshipping their ancestral gods according to the customs of their respective countries, yet the city has never officially adopted any of those foreign practices, as has been the experience of many cities in the past; but, even though she has, in pursuance of oracles, introduced certain rites from abroad, she celebrates them in accordance with her own traditions, after banishing all fabulous clap-trap. The rites of the Idaean goddess are a case in point;,4.  for the praetors perform sacrifices and celebrated games in her honour every year according to the Roman customs, but the priest and priestess of the goddess are Phrygians, and it is they who carry her image in procession through the city, begging alms in her name according to their custom, and wearing figures upon their breasts and striking their timbrels while their followers play tunes upon their flutes in honour of the Mother of the Gods.,5.  But by a law and decree of the senate no native Roman walks in procession through the city arrayed in a parti-coloured robe, begging alms or escorted by flute-players, or worships the god with the Phrygian ceremonies. So cautious are they about admitting any foreign religious customs and so great is their aversion to all pompous display that is wanting in decorum.
4. Livy, History, 29.10.4-29.10.8, 29.11.8, 29.14.5-29.14.14, 39.8-39.19 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

5. Lucretius Carus, On The Nature of Things, 2.610-2.628 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

6. Ovid, Fasti, 4.179-4.190, 4.193-4.244, 4.247-4.348 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

4.179. Let the sky turn three times on its axis 4.180. Let the Sun three times yoke and loose his horses 4.181. And the Berecyntian flute will begin sounding 4.182. Its curved horn, it will be the Idaean Mother’s feast. 4.183. Eunuchs will march, and sound the hollow drums 4.184. And cymbal will clash with cymbal, in ringing tones: 4.185. Seated on the soft necks of her servants, she’ll be carried 4.186. With howling, through the midst of the City streets. 4.187. The stage is set: the games are calling. Watch, then 4.188. Quirites, and let those legal wars in the fora cease. 4.189. I’d like to ask many things, but I’m made fearful 4.190. By shrill clash of bronze, and curved flute’s dreadful drone. 4.193. ‘Nurslings of Helicon, mindful of her orders, reveal 4.194. Why the Great Goddess delights in continual din.’ 4.195. So I spoke. And Erato replied (it fell to her to speak about 4.196. Venus’ month, because her name derives from tender love): 4.197. ‘Saturn was granted this prophecy: “Noblest of kings 4.198. You’ll be ousted by your own son’s sceptre.” 4.199. The god, fearful, devoured his children as soon a 4.200. Born, and then retained them deep in his guts. 4.201. often Rhea (Cybele) complained, at being so often pregt 4.202. Yet never a mother, and grieved at her own fruitfulness. 4.203. Then Jupiter was born (ancient testimony is credited 4.204. By most: so please don’t disturb the accepted belief): 4.205. A stone, concealed in clothing, went down Saturn’s throat 4.206. So the great progenitor was deceived by the fates. 4.207. Now steep Ida echoed to a jingling music 4.208. So the child might cry from its infant mouth, in safety. 4.209. Some beat shields with sticks, others empty helmets: 4.210. That was the Curetes’ and the Corybantes’ task. 4.211. The thing was hidden, and the ancient deed’s still acted out: 4.212. The goddess’s servants strike the bronze and sounding skins. 4.213. They beat cymbals for helmets, drums instead of shields: 4.214. The flute plays, as long ago, in the Phrygian mode.’ 4.215. The goddess ceased. I began: ‘Why do fierce lion 4.216. Yield untamed necks to the curving yoke for her?’ 4.217. I ceased. The goddess began: ‘It’s thought their ferocity 4.218. Was first tamed by her: the testament to it’s her chariot.’ 4.219. ‘But why is her head weighed down by a turreted crown? 4.220. Is it because she granted towers to the first cities?’ 4.221. She nodded. I said ‘Where did this urge to cut off 4.222. Their members come from?’ As I ended, the Muse spoke: 4.223. ‘In the woods, a Phrygian boy, Attis, of handsome face 4.224. Won the tower-bearing goddess with his chaste passion. 4.225. She desired him to serve her, and protect her temple 4.226. And said: “Wish, you might be a boy for ever.” 4.227. He promised to be true, and said: “If I’m lying 4.228. May the love I fail in be my last love.” 4.229. He did fail, and in meeting the nymph Sagaritis 4.230. Abandoned what he was: the goddess, angered, avenged it. 4.231. She destroyed the Naiad, by wounding a tree 4.232. Since the tree contained the Naiad’s fate. 4.233. Attis was maddened, and thinking his chamber’s roof 4.234. Was falling, fled for the summit of Mount Dindymus. 4.235. Now he cried: “Remove the torches”, now he cried: 4.236. “Take the whips away”: often swearing he saw the Furies. 4.237. He tore at his body too with a sharp stone 4.238. And dragged his long hair in the filthy dust 4.239. Shouting: “I deserved this! I pay the due penalty 4.240. In blood! Ah! Let the parts that harmed me, perish! 4.241. Let them perish!” cutting away the burden of his groin 4.242. And suddenly bereft of every mark of manhood. 4.243. His madness set a precedent, and his unmanly servant 4.244. Toss their hair, and cut off their members as if worthless.’ 4.247. ‘Guide of my work, I beg you, teach me also, where She 4.248. Was brought from. Was she always resident in our City? 4.249. ‘The Mother Goddess always loved Dindymus, Cybele 4.250. And Ida, with its pleasant streams, and the Trojan realm: 4.251. And when Aeneas brought Troy to Italian fields, the godde 4.252. Almost followed those ships that carried the sacred relics. 4.253. But she felt that fate didn’t require her powers in Latium 4.254. So she stayed behind in her long-accustomed place. 4.255. Later, when Rome was more than five centuries old 4.256. And had lifted its head above the conquered world 4.257. The priest consulted the fateful words of Euboean prophecy: 4.258. They say that what he found there was as follows: 4.259. ‘The Mother’s absent: Roman, I command you: seek the Mother. 4.260. When she arrives, she must be received in chaste hands.’ 4.261. The dark oracle’s ambiguity set the senators puzzling 4.262. As to who that parent might be, and where to seek her. 4.263. Apollo was consulted, and replied: ‘Fetch the Mother 4.264. of all the Gods, who you’ll find there on Mount Ida.’ 4.265. Noblemen were sent. Attalus at that time held 4.266. The Phrygian sceptre: he refused the Italian lords. 4.267. Marvellous to tell, the earth shook with long murmurs 4.268. And the goddess, from her shrine, spoke as follows: 4.269. ‘I myself wished them to seek me: don’t delay: send me 4.270. Willingly. Rome is a worthy place for all divinities.’ 4.271. Quaking with fear at her words, Attalus, said: ‘Go 4.272. You’ll still be ours: Rome claims Phrygian ancestry.’ 4.273. Immediately countless axes felled the pine-tree 4.274. Those trees pious Aeneas employed for his flight: 4.275. A thousand hands work, and the heavenly Mother 4.276. Soon has a hollow ship, painted in fiery colours. 4.277. She’s carried in perfect safety over her son’s waves 4.278. And reaches the long strait named for Phrixus’ sister 4.279. Passes fierce Rhoetum and the Sigean shore 4.280. And Tenedos and Eetion’s ancient kingdom. 4.281. Leaving Lesbos behind she then steered for the Cyclades 4.282. And the waves that break on Euboea’s Carystian shoals. 4.283. She passed the Icarian Sea, as well, where Icarus shed 4.284. His melting wings, giving his name to a vast tract of water. 4.285. Then leaving Crete to larboard, and the Pelopian wave 4.286. To starboard, she headed for Cythera, sacred to Venus. 4.287. From there to the Sicilian Sea, where Brontes, Sterope 4.288. And Aemonides forge their red-hot iron 4.289. Then, skirting African waters, she saw the Sardinian 4.290. Realm behind to larboard, and reached our Italy. 4.291. She’d arrived at the mouth (ostia) where the Tiber divide 4.292. To meet the deep, and flows with a wider sweep: 4.293. All the Knights, grave Senators, and commoners 4.294. Came to meet her at the mouth of the Tuscan river. 4.295. With them walked mothers, daughters, and brides 4.296. And all those virgins who tend the sacred fires. 4.297. The men wearied their arms hauling hard on the ropes: 4.298. The foreign vessel barely made way against the stream. 4.299. For a long time there’d been a drought: the grass was dry 4.300. And scorched: the boat stuck fast in the muddy shallows. 4.301. Every man, hauling, laboured beyond his strength 4.302. And encouraged their toiling hands with his cries. 4.303. Yet the ship lodged there, like an island fixed in mid-ocean: 4.304. And astonished at the portent, men stood and quaked. 4.305. Claudia Quinta traced her descent from noble Clausus 4.306. And her beauty was in no way unequal to her nobility: 4.307. She was chaste, but not believed so: hostile rumour 4.308. Had wounded her, false charges were levelled at her: 4.309. Her elegance, promenading around in various hairstyles 4.310. And her ready tongue, with stiff old men, counted against her. 4.311. Conscious of virtue, she laughed at the rumoured lies 4.312. But we’re always ready to credit others with faults. 4.313. Now, when she’d stepped from the line of chaste women 4.314. Taking pure river water in her hands, she wetted her head 4.315. Three times, three times lifted her palms to the sky 4.316. (Everyone watching her thought she’d lost her mind) 4.317. Then, kneeling, fixed her eyes on the goddess’s statue 4.318. And, with loosened hair, uttered these words: 4.319. “ Kind and fruitful Mother of the Gods, accept 4.320. A suppliant’s prayers, on this one condition: 4.321. They deny I’m chaste: let me be guilty if you condemn me: 4.322. Convicted by a goddess I’ll pay for it with my life. 4.323. But if I’m free of guilt, grant a pledge of my innocence 4.324. By your action: and, chaste, give way to my chaste hands.” 4.325. She spoke: then gave a slight pull at the rope 4.326. (A wonder, but the sacred drama attests what I say): 4.327. The goddess stirred, followed, and, following, approved her: 4.328. Witness the sound of jubilation carried to the stars. 4.329. They came to a bend in the river (called of old 4.330. The Halls of Tiber): there the stream turns left, ascending. 4.331. Night fell: they tied the rope to an oak stump 4.332. And, having eaten, settled to a tranquil sleep. 4.333. Dawn rose: they loosed the rope from the oak stump 4.334. After first laying a fire and offering incense 4.335. And crowned the stern, and sacrificed a heifer 4.336. Free of blemish, that had never known yoke or bull. 4.337. There’s a place where smooth-flowing Almo joins the Tiber 4.338. And the lesser flow loses its name in the greater: 4.339. There, a white-headed priest in purple robe 4.340. Washed the Lady, and sacred relics, in Almo’s water. 4.341. The attendants howled, and the mad flutes blew 4.342. And soft hands beat at the bull’s-hide drums. 4.343. Claudia walked in front with a joyful face 4.344. Her chastity proven by the goddess’s testimony: 4.345. The goddess herself, sitting in a cart, entered the Capene Gate: 4.346. Fresh flowers were scattered over the yoked oxen. 4.347. Nasica received her. The name of her temple’s founder is lost: 4.348. Augustus has re-dedicated it, and, before him, Metellus.’
7. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 4.28-4.30 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

8. Strabo, Geography, 10.3.12, 13.4.14 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

10.3.12. But as for the Berecyntes, a tribe of Phrygians, and the Phrygians in general, and those of the Trojans who live round Ida, they too hold Rhea in honor and worship her with orgies, calling her Mother of the Gods and Agdistis and Phrygia the Great Goddess, and also, from the places where she is worshipped, Idaea and Dindymene and Sipylene and Pessinuntis and Cybele and Cybebe. The Greeks use the same name Curetes for the ministers of the goddess, not taking the name, however, from the same mythical story, but regarding them as a different set of Curetes, helpers as it were, analogous to the Satyri; and the same they also call Corybantes. 13.4.14. When one crosses over the Mesogis, between the Carians and the territory of Nysa, which latter is a country on the far side of the Maeander extending to Cibyratis and Cabalis, one comes to certain cities. First, near the Mesogis, opposite Laodiceia, to Hierapolis, where are the hot springs and the Plutonion, both of which have something marvellous about them; for the water of the springs so easily congeals and changes into stone that people conduct streams of it through ditches and thus make stone fences consisting of single stones, while the Plutonion, below a small brow of the mountainous country that lies above it, is an opening of only moderate size, large enough to admit a man, but it reaches a considerable depth, and it is enclosed by a quadrilateral handrail, about half a plethrum in circumference, and this space is full of a vapour so misty and dense that one can scarcely see the ground. Now to those who approach the handrail anywhere round the enclosure the air is harmless, since the outside is free from that vapor in calm weather, for the vapor then stays inside the enclosure, but any animal that passes inside meets instant death. At any rate, bulls that are led into it fall and are dragged out dead; and I threw in sparrows and they immediately breathed their last and fell. But the Galli, who are eunuchs, pass inside with such impunity that they even approach the opening, bend over it, and descend into it to a certain depth, though they hold their breath as much as they can (for I could see in their counteces an indication of a kind of suffocating attack, as it were), — whether this immunity belongs to all who are maimed in this way or only to those round the sanctuary, or whether it is because of divine providence, as would be likely in the case of divine obsessions, or whether it is, the result of certain physical powers that are antidotes against the vapor. The changing of water into stone is said also to be the case with the rivers in Laodiceia, although their water is potable. The water at Hierapolis is remarkably adapted also to the dyeing of wool, so that wool dyed with the roots rival those dyed with the coccus or with the marine purple. And the supply of water is so abundant that the city is full of natural baths.
9. Juvenal, Satires, 6.511-6.516 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

10. Petronius Arbiter, Satyricon, 23.4-23.5 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

11. Petronius Arbiter, Satyricon, 23.4-23.5 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

12. Apuleius, The Golden Ass, 1.1, 8.24.2-8.24.3, 11.17 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

11.17. When we had come to the temple, the great priest and those who were assigned to carry the divine images (but especially those who had long been worshippers of the religion) went into the secret chamber of the goddess where they placed the images in order. This done, one of the company, who was a scribe or interpreter of letters, in the manner of a preacher stood up on a chair before the holy college and began to read out of a book. He began pronounce benedictions upon the great emperor, the senate, the knights, and generally to all the Roman people, and to all who are under the jurisdiction of Rome. These words following signified the end of their divine service and that it was lawful for every man to depart. Whereupon all the people gave a great shout and, filled with much joy, bore all kind of herbs and garlands of flowers home to their houses, kissing and embracing the steps where the goddess had passed. However, I could not do as the rest did, for my mind would not allow me to depart one foot away. This was how eager I was to behold the beauty of the goddess, remembering the great misery I had endured.
13. Cassius Dio, Roman History, 68.27.3 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

68.27.3.  Hence creatures that fly high enough above it and those that graze at one side are safe. I saw another opening like it at Hierapolis in Asia, and tested it by means of birds; I also bent over it myself and saw the vapour myself. It is enclosed in a sort of cistern and a theatre had been built over it. It destroys all living things save human beings that have been emasculated. The reason for this I cannot understand; I merely relate what I saw as I saw it and what I heard as I heard it.
14. Longus, Daphnis And Chloe, 3.20.1-3.20.2 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

15. Lucian, Asinus, 36 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

16. Arnobius, Against The Gentiles, 5.5-5.7 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

17. Ammianus Marcellinus, History, 23.6.18 (4th cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

23.6.18. A similar opening was formerly to be seen (as some say) at Hierapolis in Phrygia. And from this also a noxious vapour with a penetrating stench came forth and was destructive to whatever came near it, excepting only eunuchs; and the reason for this may be left to natural philosophers to determine. Cf. Dio. lxviii. 27, 3; Pliny, N.H. ii. 208.
18. Epigraphy, Ils, 18



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
achilles tatius Pinheiro et al., Narrating Desire: Eros, Sex, and Gender in the Ancient Novel (2012a) 115
aeneas Pinheiro Bierl and Beck, Anton Bierl? and Roger Beck?, Intende, Lector - Echoes of Myth, Religion and Ritual in the Ancient Novel (2013) 243
anatolian languages Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 121
androgyny Gazzarri and Weiner, Searching for the Cinaedus in Ancient Rome (2023) 184, 269
animals, donkey Gazzarri and Weiner, Searching for the Cinaedus in Ancient Rome (2023) 202, 218
animals, fish Gazzarri and Weiner, Searching for the Cinaedus in Ancient Rome (2023) 184
animals, general Gazzarri and Weiner, Searching for the Cinaedus in Ancient Rome (2023) 218
anubis; subject of mime Sider, Christian and Pagan in the Roman Empire: The Witness of Tertullian (2001) 33
anxiety, male sexual Pinheiro et al., Narrating Desire: Eros, Sex, and Gender in the Ancient Novel (2012a) 115
apuleius Pinheiro Bierl and Beck, Anton Bierl? and Roger Beck?, Intende, Lector - Echoes of Myth, Religion and Ritual in the Ancient Novel (2013) 243
asia minor Price, Finkelberg and Shahar, Rome: An Empire of Many Nations: New Perspectives on Ethnic Diversity and Cultural Identity (2021) 172
attis; loved by cybele Sider, Christian and Pagan in the Roman Empire: The Witness of Tertullian (2001) 33
bandits Pinheiro et al., Narrating Desire: Eros, Sex, and Gender in the Ancient Novel (2012a) 115
blood, symbolism of Pinheiro et al., Narrating Desire: Eros, Sex, and Gender in the Ancient Novel (2012a) 115
body, desire, and Pinheiro et al., Narrating Desire: Eros, Sex, and Gender in the Ancient Novel (2012a) 115
body Pinheiro et al., Narrating Desire: Eros, Sex, and Gender in the Ancient Novel (2012a) 115
brixhe, claude Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 121
burkert, walter Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 121
cassius dio Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 56
castration Gazzarri and Weiner, Searching for the Cinaedus in Ancient Rome (2023) 184, 201, 218, 269
catullus Pinheiro et al., Narrating Desire: Eros, Sex, and Gender in the Ancient Novel (2012a) 115
charikleia (charicleia) Pinheiro et al., Narrating Desire: Eros, Sex, and Gender in the Ancient Novel (2012a) 115
chloe Pinheiro et al., Narrating Desire: Eros, Sex, and Gender in the Ancient Novel (2012a) 115
class (social) Gazzarri and Weiner, Searching for the Cinaedus in Ancient Rome (2023) 184
clothing Gazzarri and Weiner, Searching for the Cinaedus in Ancient Rome (2023) 201
convergences (christian—pagan) Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 56
cybebe Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 121
cybele, rites of Pinheiro Bierl and Beck, Anton Bierl? and Roger Beck?, Intende, Lector - Echoes of Myth, Religion and Ritual in the Ancient Novel (2013) 243
cybele Gazzarri and Weiner, Searching for the Cinaedus in Ancient Rome (2023) 201, 269; Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 121; Pinheiro Bierl and Beck, Anton Bierl? and Roger Beck?, Intende, Lector - Echoes of Myth, Religion and Ritual in the Ancient Novel (2013) 243
cybelus Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 121
dance Gazzarri and Weiner, Searching for the Cinaedus in Ancient Rome (2023) 201
daphnis Pinheiro et al., Narrating Desire: Eros, Sex, and Gender in the Ancient Novel (2012a) 115
dea syria (atargatis) Gazzarri and Weiner, Searching for the Cinaedus in Ancient Rome (2023) 202, 218
delphi Price, Finkelberg and Shahar, Rome: An Empire of Many Nations: New Perspectives on Ethnic Diversity and Cultural Identity (2021) 172
desire Pinheiro et al., Narrating Desire: Eros, Sex, and Gender in the Ancient Novel (2012a) 115
diakonoff, igor m. Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 121
dindymene Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 121
dionysus Price, Finkelberg and Shahar, Rome: An Empire of Many Nations: New Perspectives on Ethnic Diversity and Cultural Identity (2021) 172
disgust Gazzarri and Weiner, Searching for the Cinaedus in Ancient Rome (2023) 184
dream Pinheiro et al., Narrating Desire: Eros, Sex, and Gender in the Ancient Novel (2012a) 115
drinking / drinking parties Gazzarri and Weiner, Searching for the Cinaedus in Ancient Rome (2023) 218
effeminacy Gazzarri and Weiner, Searching for the Cinaedus in Ancient Rome (2023) 184, 201, 202, 218
ekphrasis/ecphrasis, encolpius, of compared to aeneas Pinheiro Bierl and Beck, Anton Bierl? and Roger Beck?, Intende, Lector - Echoes of Myth, Religion and Ritual in the Ancient Novel (2013) 243
ers Pinheiro et al., Narrating Desire: Eros, Sex, and Gender in the Ancient Novel (2012a) 115
eumolpus Pinheiro Bierl and Beck, Anton Bierl? and Roger Beck?, Intende, Lector - Echoes of Myth, Religion and Ritual in the Ancient Novel (2013) 243
eunuchs Gazzarri and Weiner, Searching for the Cinaedus in Ancient Rome (2023) 201
fortuna (fortune) Pinheiro Bierl and Beck, Anton Bierl? and Roger Beck?, Intende, Lector - Echoes of Myth, Religion and Ritual in the Ancient Novel (2013) 243
fortunata Pinheiro Bierl and Beck, Anton Bierl? and Roger Beck?, Intende, Lector - Echoes of Myth, Religion and Ritual in the Ancient Novel (2013) 243
galli Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 56
gallos / gallus / galloi / galli Gazzarri and Weiner, Searching for the Cinaedus in Ancient Rome (2023) 184, 201, 202, 218
giton Pinheiro Bierl and Beck, Anton Bierl? and Roger Beck?, Intende, Lector - Echoes of Myth, Religion and Ritual in the Ancient Novel (2013) 243
gods; shamefully represented Sider, Christian and Pagan in the Roman Empire: The Witness of Tertullian (2001) 33
gusmani, roberto Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 121
hair / hairstyle / body-hair Gazzarri and Weiner, Searching for the Cinaedus in Ancient Rome (2023) 201
hannibal Price, Finkelberg and Shahar, Rome: An Empire of Many Nations: New Perspectives on Ethnic Diversity and Cultural Identity (2021) 172
heliodoros (heliodorus) Pinheiro et al., Narrating Desire: Eros, Sex, and Gender in the Ancient Novel (2012a) 115
hierapolis, plutonium Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 56
innocente, lucia Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 121
insult / mockery / ridicule Gazzarri and Weiner, Searching for the Cinaedus in Ancient Rome (2023) 184
ionia Gazzarri and Weiner, Searching for the Cinaedus in Ancient Rome (2023) 184
isis Gazzarri and Weiner, Searching for the Cinaedus in Ancient Rome (2023) 201; Pinheiro Bierl and Beck, Anton Bierl? and Roger Beck?, Intende, Lector - Echoes of Myth, Religion and Ritual in the Ancient Novel (2013) 243
kinaidos Hubbard, A Companion to Greek and Roman Sexualities (2014) 221
kubaba Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 121
kybebe Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 121
kybele, origin of the name of Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 121
kybele Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 121
laroche, emmanuel Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 121
liminal, liminality Alvar Ezquerra, Romanising Oriental Gods: Myth, Salvation, and Ethics in the Cults of Cybele, Isis, and Mithras (2008) 170
lion (metroac symbol) Alvar Ezquerra, Romanising Oriental Gods: Myth, Salvation, and Ethics in the Cults of Cybele, Isis, and Mithras (2008) 170
longus Pinheiro et al., Narrating Desire: Eros, Sex, and Gender in the Ancient Novel (2012a) 115
lydia and lydians, and phrygian symbols Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 121
lydia and lydians, language of Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 121
lykainion (lykanion, lycaenion) Pinheiro et al., Narrating Desire: Eros, Sex, and Gender in the Ancient Novel (2012a) 115
m. aurelius eutychianos (hierapolis) Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 56
magna mater Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 121; Price, Finkelberg and Shahar, Rome: An Empire of Many Nations: New Perspectives on Ethnic Diversity and Cultural Identity (2021) 172
matar kubeleya Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 121
mater magna Alvar Ezquerra, Romanising Oriental Gods: Myth, Salvation, and Ethics in the Cults of Cybele, Isis, and Mithras (2008) 170
meter Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 56
mimes Sider, Christian and Pagan in the Roman Empire: The Witness of Tertullian (2001) 33
montanism Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 56
mother of the gods, as lydian kybebe Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 121
mother of the gods, as mountain mother Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 121
mother of the gods, as phrygian matar Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 121
mother of the gods, as rhea Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 121
mother of the gods, associated with mountains Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 121
mother of the gods, place names associated with Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 121
mother of the gods, scholarship on Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 121
motif, fortuna Pinheiro Bierl and Beck, Anton Bierl? and Roger Beck?, Intende, Lector - Echoes of Myth, Religion and Ritual in the Ancient Novel (2013) 243
movement, kinetic / sexual Gazzarri and Weiner, Searching for the Cinaedus in Ancient Rome (2023) 201
music; at pantomime Sider, Christian and Pagan in the Roman Empire: The Witness of Tertullian (2001) 33
mutilation, sexual Hubbard, A Companion to Greek and Roman Sexualities (2014) 221
mystery (mysteries), demeter, of Pinheiro Bierl and Beck, Anton Bierl? and Roger Beck?, Intende, Lector - Echoes of Myth, Religion and Ritual in the Ancient Novel (2013) 243
myth Alvar Ezquerra, Romanising Oriental Gods: Myth, Salvation, and Ethics in the Cults of Cybele, Isis, and Mithras (2008) 170
novel, ancient Alvar Ezquerra, Romanising Oriental Gods: Myth, Salvation, and Ethics in the Cults of Cybele, Isis, and Mithras (2008) 170
obscenity Gazzarri and Weiner, Searching for the Cinaedus in Ancient Rome (2023) 184
opposition Alvar Ezquerra, Romanising Oriental Gods: Myth, Salvation, and Ethics in the Cults of Cybele, Isis, and Mithras (2008) 170
pagans Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 56
palatine hill Price, Finkelberg and Shahar, Rome: An Empire of Many Nations: New Perspectives on Ethnic Diversity and Cultural Identity (2021) 172
pantomime Sider, Christian and Pagan in the Roman Empire: The Witness of Tertullian (2001) 33
performance Gazzarri and Weiner, Searching for the Cinaedus in Ancient Rome (2023) 184, 201, 202, 218
phaethon; lamented by sol Sider, Christian and Pagan in the Roman Empire: The Witness of Tertullian (2001) 33
phrygia and phrygians, language of Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 121
rhea Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 121
satyricon/satyrica Pinheiro Bierl and Beck, Anton Bierl? and Roger Beck?, Intende, Lector - Echoes of Myth, Religion and Ritual in the Ancient Novel (2013) 243
scorn gods Sider, Christian and Pagan in the Roman Empire: The Witness of Tertullian (2001) 33
sexual intercourse / sexual penetration, anal Gazzarri and Weiner, Searching for the Cinaedus in Ancient Rome (2023) 201, 218
sexual intercourse / sexual penetration, cunnilingus Gazzarri and Weiner, Searching for the Cinaedus in Ancient Rome (2023) 184
sexual intercourse / sexual penetration, fellatio Gazzarri and Weiner, Searching for the Cinaedus in Ancient Rome (2023) 201
sexual intercourse / sexual penetration, pedicare Gazzarri and Weiner, Searching for the Cinaedus in Ancient Rome (2023) 184
sexuality, perverse / deviant Gazzarri and Weiner, Searching for the Cinaedus in Ancient Rome (2023) 201, 202
slaves / slavery Gazzarri and Weiner, Searching for the Cinaedus in Ancient Rome (2023) 269
softness Gazzarri and Weiner, Searching for the Cinaedus in Ancient Rome (2023) 218
spectacula; gods insulted at' Sider, Christian and Pagan in the Roman Empire: The Witness of Tertullian (2001) 33
strabo Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 56
sun; as sol Sider, Christian and Pagan in the Roman Empire: The Witness of Tertullian (2001) 33
thyamis Pinheiro et al., Narrating Desire: Eros, Sex, and Gender in the Ancient Novel (2012a) 115
translation Gazzarri and Weiner, Searching for the Cinaedus in Ancient Rome (2023) 201
trimalchio Pinheiro Bierl and Beck, Anton Bierl? and Roger Beck?, Intende, Lector - Echoes of Myth, Religion and Ritual in the Ancient Novel (2013) 243
vermaseren, maarten j. Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 121
violence Gazzarri and Weiner, Searching for the Cinaedus in Ancient Rome (2023) 184
virginity, parthenia, and Pinheiro et al., Narrating Desire: Eros, Sex, and Gender in the Ancient Novel (2012a) 115
virginity Pinheiro et al., Narrating Desire: Eros, Sex, and Gender in the Ancient Novel (2012a) 115
voice / mannerisms of speech Gazzarri and Weiner, Searching for the Cinaedus in Ancient Rome (2023) 202
witches / witchcraft, women, cinaedi and Gazzarri and Weiner, Searching for the Cinaedus in Ancient Rome (2023) 269
zeitlin Pinheiro Bierl and Beck, Anton Bierl? and Roger Beck?, Intende, Lector - Echoes of Myth, Religion and Ritual in the Ancient Novel (2013) 243
zeus; zeus-helios Alvar Ezquerra, Romanising Oriental Gods: Myth, Salvation, and Ethics in the Cults of Cybele, Isis, and Mithras (2008) 170
zeus Alvar Ezquerra, Romanising Oriental Gods: Myth, Salvation, and Ethics in the Cults of Cybele, Isis, and Mithras (2008) 170
zgusta, ladislav Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 121
zoroastrianism Alvar Ezquerra, Romanising Oriental Gods: Myth, Salvation, and Ethics in the Cults of Cybele, Isis, and Mithras (2008) 170