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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



2180
Cato, Marcus Porcius, On Agriculture, 61.1
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

4 results
1. Cicero, On Duties, 1.151, 2.12 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.151. Quibus autem artibus aut prudentia maior inest aut non mediocris utilitas quaeritur, ut medicina, ut architectura, ut doctrina rerum honestarum, eae sunt iis, quorum ordini conveniunt, honestae. Mercatura autem, si tenuis est. sordida putanda est; sin magna et copiosa, multa undique apportans multisque sine vanitate impertiens, non est admodum vituperanda, atque etiam, si satiata quaestu vel contenta potius, ut saepe ex alto in portum, ex ipso portu se in agros possessionesque contulit, videtur iure optimo posse laudari. Omnium autem rerum, ex quibus aliquid acquiritur, nihil est agri cultura melius, nihil uberius, nihil dulcius, nihil homine libero dignius; de qua quoniam in Catone Maiore satis multa diximus, illim assumes, quae ad hunc locum pertinebunt. 2.12. Earumque item rerum, quae noceant et obsint, eadem divisio est. Sed quia deos nocere non putant, iis exceptis homines hominibus obesse plurimum arbitrantur. Ea enim ipsa, quae iima diximus, pleraque sunt hominum operis effecta; quae nec haberemus, nisi manus et ars accessisset, nec iis sine hominum administratione uteremur. Neque enim valetudinis curatio neque navigatio neque agri cultura neque frugum fructuumque reliquorum perceptio et conservatio sine hominum opera ulla esse potuisset. 1.151.  But the professions in which either a higher degree of intelligence is required or from which no small benefit to society is derived — medicine and architecture, for example, and teaching — these are proper for those whose social position they become. Trade, if it is on a small scale, is to be considered vulgar; but if wholesale and on a large scale, importing large quantities from all parts of the world and distributing to many without misrepresentation, it is not to be greatly disparaged. Nay, it even seems to deserve the highest respect, if those who are engaged in it, satiated, or rather, I should say, satisfied with the fortunes they have made, make their way from the port to a country estate, as they have often made it from the sea into port. But of all the occupations by which gain is secured, none is better than agriculture, none more profitable, none more delightful, none more becoming to a freeman. But since I have discussed this quite fully in my Cato Major, you will find there the material that applies to this point. 2.12.  The same classification may likewise be made of the things that are injurious and hurtful. But, as people think that the gods bring us no harm, they decide (leaving the gods out of the question) that men are most hurtful to men. As for mutual helpfulness, those very things which we have called iimate are for the most part themselves produced by man's labours; we should not have them without the application of manual labour and skill nor could we enjoy them without the intervention of man. And so with many other things: for without man's industry there could have been no provisions for health, no navigation, no agriculture, no ingathering or storing of the fruits of the field or other kinds of produce.
2. Cicero, On Old Age, 53 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3. Lucretius Carus, On The Nature of Things, 5.148 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4. Vergil, Georgics, 1.1, 1.45-1.46, 1.72, 1.119, 1.147, 1.155-1.157, 1.204, 1.351, 2.513 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.1. What makes the cornfield smile; beneath what star 1.45. His arms draws in, yea, and hath left thee more 1.46. Than thy full meed of heaven: be what thou wilt— 1.72. The saffron's fragrance, ivory from Ind 1.119. Him golden Ceres not in vain regards; 1.147. But no whit the more 1.155. The slumbering glebe, whetting the minds of men 1.156. With care on care, nor suffering realm of hi 1.157. In drowsy sloth to stagnate. Before Jove 1.204. Without which, neither can be sown nor reared 1.351. Coeus, Iapetus, and Typhoeus fell 2.513. Twice doth the thickening shade beset the vine


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
agri cultura, central conceptual unit of res rusticae Nelsestuen, Varro the Agronomist: Political Philosophy, Satire, and Agriculture in the Late Republic (2015) 66
agri cultura, concept of Nelsestuen, Varro the Agronomist: Political Philosophy, Satire, and Agriculture in the Late Republic (2015) 66
agri cultura, distinction from pastio (animal husbandry) Nelsestuen, Varro the Agronomist: Political Philosophy, Satire, and Agriculture in the Late Republic (2015) 66
agri cultura, linguistic form of Nelsestuen, Varro the Agronomist: Political Philosophy, Satire, and Agriculture in the Late Republic (2015) 66
agricola (farmer) Nelsestuen, Varro the Agronomist: Political Philosophy, Satire, and Agriculture in the Late Republic (2015) 66
agronomy, tradition of Nelsestuen, Varro the Agronomist: Political Philosophy, Satire, and Agriculture in the Late Republic (2015) 66
aristaeus and orpheus Perkell, The Poet's Truth: A Study of the Poet in Virgil's Georgics (1989) 30
caesar, c. julius, as author Nelsestuen, Varro the Agronomist: Political Philosophy, Satire, and Agriculture in the Late Republic (2015) 66
caesar, octavian, and maecenas Perkell, The Poet's Truth: A Study of the Poet in Virgil's Georgics (1989) 30
caesar, octavian, as reader Perkell, The Poet's Truth: A Study of the Poet in Virgil's Georgics (1989) 30
cato, m. porcius, as author of de agri cultura Nelsestuen, Varro the Agronomist: Political Philosophy, Satire, and Agriculture in the Late Republic (2015) 66
cato, m. porcius, as interlocutor in de senectute Nelsestuen, Varro the Agronomist: Political Philosophy, Satire, and Agriculture in the Late Republic (2015) 66
cato Perkell, The Poet's Truth: A Study of the Poet in Virgil's Georgics (1989) 30
cicero, m. tullius, speeches of Nelsestuen, Varro the Agronomist: Political Philosophy, Satire, and Agriculture in the Late Republic (2015) 66
cicero, m. tullius, use of agricultural vocabulary in Nelsestuen, Varro the Agronomist: Political Philosophy, Satire, and Agriculture in the Late Republic (2015) 66
colere (to tend or to inhabit) Nelsestuen, Varro the Agronomist: Political Philosophy, Satire, and Agriculture in the Late Republic (2015) 66
de re publica (cicero) Nelsestuen, Varro the Agronomist: Political Philosophy, Satire, and Agriculture in the Late Republic (2015) 66
de re rustica (varro), definitions in Nelsestuen, Varro the Agronomist: Political Philosophy, Satire, and Agriculture in the Late Republic (2015) 66
de re rustica (varro), intellectual program of Nelsestuen, Varro the Agronomist: Political Philosophy, Satire, and Agriculture in the Late Republic (2015) 66
farmer Perkell, The Poet's Truth: A Study of the Poet in Virgil's Georgics (1989) 30
maecenas and caesar, as reader of the poem Perkell, The Poet's Truth: A Study of the Poet in Virgil's Georgics (1989) 30
maecenas and caesar Perkell, The Poet's Truth: A Study of the Poet in Virgil's Georgics (1989) 30
pastio agrestis (animal husbandry), distinction from agri cultura Nelsestuen, Varro the Agronomist: Political Philosophy, Satire, and Agriculture in the Late Republic (2015) 66
pastio villatica (animal husbandry of the villa), distinction from agri cultura Nelsestuen, Varro the Agronomist: Political Philosophy, Satire, and Agriculture in the Late Republic (2015) 66
pastio villatica (animal husbandry of the villa), distinction from pastio agrestis (animal husbandry) Nelsestuen, Varro the Agronomist: Political Philosophy, Satire, and Agriculture in the Late Republic (2015) 66
res rusticae, concept of' Nelsestuen, Varro the Agronomist: Political Philosophy, Satire, and Agriculture in the Late Republic (2015) 66