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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



2165
Cassius Dio, Roman History, 66.15.1
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

21 results
1. Ennius, Annales, 363 (3rd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

2. Cicero, In Verrem, 2.1.55, 2.4.79, 2.4.120-2.4.121 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3. Augustus, Res Gestae Divi Augusti, 13 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

4. Dionysius of Halycarnassus, Roman Antiquities, 4.40.7 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4.40.7.  And it was made clear by another prodigy that this man was dear to the gods; in consequence of which that fabulous and incredible opinion I have already mentioned concerning his birth also came to be regarded by many as true. For in the temple of Fortune which he himself had built there stood a gilded wooden statue of Tullius, and when a conflagration occurred and everything else was destroyed, this statue alone remained uninjured by the flames. And even to this day, although the temple itself and all the objects in it, which were restored to their formed condition after the fire, are obviously the products of modern art, the statue, as aforetime, is of ancient workmanship; for it still remains an object of veneration by the Romans. Concerning Tullius these are all the facts that have been handed down to us.
5. Livy, History, 23.30.13, 23.31.9, 24.47.15, 33.27.4, 38.9, 38.43.5, 42.6 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

6. Ovid, Fasti, 6.569-6.572, 6.613-6.625 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

6.569. Day, doubled the enemy’s strength. 6.570. Fortuna, the same day is yours, your temple 6.571. Founded by the same king, in the same place. 6.572. And whose is that statue hidden under draped robes? 6.613. Yet she still dared to visit her father’s temple 6.614. His monument: what I tell is strange but true. 6.615. There was a statue enthroned, an image of Servius: 6.616. They say it put a hand to its eyes 6.617. And a voice was heard: ‘Hide my face 6.618. Lest it view my own wicked daughter.’ 6.619. It was veiled by cloth, Fortune refused to let the robe 6.620. Be removed, and she herself spoke from her temple: 6.621. ‘The day when Servius’ face is next revealed 6.622. Will be a day when shame is cast aside.’ 6.623. Women, beware of touching the forbidden cloth 6.624. (It’s sufficient to utter prayers in solemn tones) 6.625. And let him who was the City’s seventh king
7. Strabo, Geography, 7.6.1 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

7.6.1. Pontic seaboard The remainder of the country between the Ister and the mountains on either side of Paeonia consists of that part of the Pontic seaboard which extends from the Sacred Mouth of the Ister as far as the mountainous country in the neighborhood of the Haemus and as far as the mouth at Byzantium. And just as, in traversing the Illyrian seaboard, I proceeded as far as the Ceraunian Mountains, because, although they fall outside the mountainous country of Illyria, they afford an appropriate limit, and just as I determined the positions of the tribes of the interior by these mountains, because I thought that marks of this kind would be more significant as regards both the description at hand and what was to follow, so also in this case the seaboard, even though it falls beyond the mountain-line, will nevertheless end at an appropriate limit — the mouth of the Pontus — as regards both the description at hand and that which comes next in order. So, then, if one begins at the Sacred Mouth of the Ister and keeps the continuous seaboard on the right, one comes, at a distance of five hundred stadia, to a small town, Ister, founded by the Milesians; then, at a distance of two hundred and fifty stadia, to a second small town, Tomis; then, at two hundred and eighty stadia, to a city Callatis, a colony of the Heracleotae; then, at one thousand three hundred stadia, to Apollonia, a colony of the Milesians. The greater part of Apollonia was founded on a certain isle, where there is a sanctuary of Apollo, from which Marcus Lucullus carried off the colossal statue of Apollo, a work of Calamis, which he set up in the Capitolium. In the interval between Callatis and Apollonia come also Bizone, of which a considerable part was engulfed by earthquakes, Cruni, Odessus, a colony of the Milesians, and Naulochus, a small town of the Mesembriani. Then comes the Haemus Mountain, which reaches the sea here; then Mesembria, a colony of the Megarians, formerly called Menebria (that is, city of Menas, because the name of its founder was Menas, while bria is the word for city in the Thracian language. In this way, also, the city of Selys is called Selybria and Aenus was once called Poltyobria). Then come Anchiale, a small town belonging to the Apolloniatae, and Apollonia itself. On this coast-line is Cape Tirizis, a stronghold, which Lysimachus once used as a treasury. Again, from Apollonia to the Cyaneae the distance is about one thousand five hundred stadia; and in the interval are Thynias, a territory belonging to the Apolloniatae (Anchiale, which also belongs to the Apolloniatae), and also Phinopolis and Andriake, which border on Salmydessus. Salmydessus is a desert and stony beach, harborless and wide open to the north winds, and in length extends as far as the Cyaneae, a distance of about seven hundred stadia; and all who are cast ashore on this beach are plundered by the Astae, a Thracian tribe who are situated above it. The Cyaneae are two islets near the mouth of the Pontus, one close to Europe and the other to Asia; they are separated by a channel of about twenty stadia and are twenty stadia distant both from the sanctuary of the Byzantines and from the sanctuary of the Chalcedonians. And this is the narrowest part of the mouth of the Euxine, for when one proceeds only ten stadia farther one comes to a headland which makes the strait only five stadia in width, and then the strait opens to a greater width and begins to form the Propontis.
8. Vergil, Aeneis, 5.704 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

5.704. of game and contest, summoned to his side
9. Josephus Flavius, Jewish War, 7.159-7.162 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

7.159. for he having now by Providence a vast quantity of wealth, besides what he had formerly gained in his other exploits, he had this temple adorned with pictures and statues; 7.161. he also laid up therein, as ensigns of his glory, those golden vessels and instruments that were taken out of the Jewish temple. 7.162. But still he gave order that they should lay up their Law, and the purple veils of the holy place, in the royal palace itself, and keep them there.
10. Pliny The Elder, Natural History, 33.112, 34.30, 34.45, 34.84, 35.66 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

11. Quintilian, Institutes of Oratory, 12.10.9 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

12.10.9.  On the other hand, Phidias is regarded as more gifted in his representation of gods station of men, and indeed for chryselephantine statues he is without a peer, as he would in truth be, even if he had produced nothing in this material beyond his Minerva at Athens and his Jupiter at Olympia in Elis, whose beauty is such that it is said to have added something even to the awe with which the god was already regarded: so perfectly did the majesty of the work give the impression of godhead. Lysippus and Praxiteles are asserted to be supreme as regards faithfulness to nature. For Demetrius is blamed for carrying realism too far, and is less concerned about the beauty than the truth of his work.
12. Quintilian, Institutio Oratoria, 12.10.9 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

12.10.9.  On the other hand, Phidias is regarded as more gifted in his representation of gods station of men, and indeed for chryselephantine statues he is without a peer, as he would in truth be, even if he had produced nothing in this material beyond his Minerva at Athens and his Jupiter at Olympia in Elis, whose beauty is such that it is said to have added something even to the awe with which the god was already regarded: so perfectly did the majesty of the work give the impression of godhead. Lysippus and Praxiteles are asserted to be supreme as regards faithfulness to nature. For Demetrius is blamed for carrying realism too far, and is less concerned about the beauty than the truth of his work.
13. Suetonius, Vespasianus, 18 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

14. Tacitus, Histories, 1.2, 4.81-4.84 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

4.81.  During the months while Vespasian was waiting at Alexandria for the regular season of the summer winds and a settled sea, many marvels continued to mark the favour of heaven and a certain partiality of the gods toward him. One of the common people of Alexandria, well known for his loss of sight, threw himself before Vespasian's knees, praying him with groans to cure his blindness, being so directed by the god Serapis, whom this most superstitious of nations worships before all others; and he besought the emperor to deign to moisten his cheeks and eyes with his spittle. Another, whose hand was useless, prompted by the same god, begged Caesar to step and trample on it. Vespasian at first ridiculed these appeals and treated them with scorn; then, when the men persisted, he began at one moment to fear the discredit of failure, at another to be inspired with hopes of success by the appeals of the suppliants and the flattery of his courtiers: finally, he directed the physicians to give their opinion as to whether such blindness and infirmity could be overcome by human aid. Their reply treated the two cases differently: they said that in the first the power of sight had not been completely eaten away and it would return if the obstacles were removed; in the other, the joints had slipped and become displaced, but they could be restored if a healing pressure were applied to them. Such perhaps was the wish of the gods, and it might be that the emperor had been chosen for this divine service; in any case, if a cure were obtained, the glory would be Caesar's, but in the event of failure, ridicule would fall only on the poor suppliants. So Vespasian, believing that his good fortune was capable of anything and that nothing was any longer incredible, with a smiling countece, and amid intense excitement on the part of the bystanders, did as he was asked to do. The hand was instantly restored to use, and the day again shone for the blind man. Both facts are told by eye-witnesses even now when falsehood brings no reward. 4.82.  These events gave Vespasian a deeper desire to visit the sanctuary of the god to consult him with regard to his imperial fortune: he ordered all to be excluded from the temple. Then after he had entered the temple and was absorbed in contemplation of the god, he saw behind him one of the leading men of Egypt, named Basilides, who he knew was detained by sickness in a place many days' journey distant from Alexandria. He asked the priests whether Basilides had entered the temple on that day; he questioned the passers-by whether he had been seen in the city; finally, he sent some cavalry and found that at that moment he had been eighty miles away: then he concluded that this was a supernatural vision and drew a prophecy from the name Basilides. 4.83.  The origin of this god has not yet been generally treated by our authors: the Egyptian priests tell the following story, that when King Ptolemy, the first of the Macedonians to put the power of Egypt on a firm foundation, was giving the new city of Alexandria walls, temples, and religious rites, there appeared to him in his sleep a vision of a young man of extraordinary beauty and of more than human stature, who warned him to send his most faithful friends to Pontus and bring his statue hither; the vision said that this act would be a happy thing for the kingdom and that the city that received the god would be great and famous: after these words the youth seemed to be carried to heaven in a blaze of fire. Ptolemy, moved by this miraculous omen, disclosed this nocturnal vision to the Egyptian priests, whose business it is to interpret such things. When they proved to know little of Pontus and foreign countries, he questioned Timotheus, an Athenian of the clan of the Eumolpidae, whom he had called from Eleusis to preside over the sacred rites, and asked him what this religion was and what the divinity meant. Timotheus learned by questioning men who had travelled to Pontus that there was a city there called Sinope, and that not far from it there was a temple of Jupiter Dis, long famous among the natives: for there sits beside the god a female figure which most call Proserpina. But Ptolemy, although prone to superstitious fears after the nature of kings, when he once more felt secure, being more eager for pleasures than religious rites, began gradually to neglect the matter and to turn his attention to other things, until the same vision, now more terrible and insistent, threatened ruin upon the king himself and his kingdom unless his orders were carried out. Then Ptolemy directed that ambassadors and gifts should be despatched to King Scydrothemis — he ruled over the people of Sinope at that time — and when the embassy was about to sail he instructed them to visit Pythian Apollo. The ambassadors found the sea favourable; and the answer of the oracle was not uncertain: Apollo bade them go on and bring back the image of his father, but leave that of his sister. 4.84.  When the ambassadors reached Sinope, they delivered the gifts, requests, and messages of their king to Scydrothemis. He was all uncertainty, now fearing the god and again being terrified by the threats and opposition of his people; often he was tempted by the gifts and promises of the ambassadors. In the meantime three years passed during which Ptolemy did not lessen his zeal or his appeals; he increased the dignity of his ambassadors, the number of his ships, and the quantity of gold offered. Then a terrifying vision appeared to Scydrothemis, warning him not to hinder longer the purposes of the god: as he still hesitated, various disasters, diseases, and the evident anger of the gods, growing heavier from day to day, beset the king. He called an assembly of his people and made known to them the god's orders, the visions that had appeared to him and to Ptolemy, and the misfortunes that were multiplying upon them: the people opposed their king; they were jealous of Egypt, afraid for themselves, and so gathered about the temple of the god. At this point the tale becomes stranger, for tradition says that the god himself, voluntarily embarking on the fleet that was lying on the shore, miraculously crossed the wide stretch of sea and reached Alexandria in two days. A temple, befitting the size of the city, was erected in the quarter called Rhacotis; there had previously been on that spot an ancient shrine dedicated to Serapis and Isis. Such is the most popular account of the origin and arrival of the god. Yet I am not unaware that there are some who maintain that the god was brought from Seleucia in Syria in the reign of Ptolemy III; still others claim that the same Ptolemy introduced the god, but that the place from which he came was Memphis, once a famous city and the bulwark of ancient Egypt. Many regard the god himself as identical with Aesculapius, because he cures the sick; some as Osiris, the oldest god among these peoples; still more identify him with Jupiter as the supreme lord of all things; the majority, however, arguing from the attributes of the god that are seen on his statue or from their own conjectures, hold him to be Father Dis.
15. Valerius Maximus, Memorable Deeds And Sayings, 1.8.11 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

16. Cassius Dio, Roman History, 75.4.5 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

17. Macrobius, Saturnalia, 1.12.16 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

18. Macrobius, Saturnalia, 1.12.16 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

19. Orosius Paulus, Historiae Adversum Paganos, 7.3.7 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

20. Scriptores Historiae Augustae, Hadrian, 19.12-19.13 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

21. Servius, Commentary On The Aeneid, 8.721 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aediles Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 299
aemilius paullus, m., triumph Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 40
aeneas Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 299
apollo, colossus of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 40
apollonia Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 40
athena Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 299
augustus Price, Finkelberg and Shahar, Rome: An Empire of Many Nations: New Perspectives on Ethnic Diversity and Cultural Identity (2021) 193; Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 40
boeotia Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 40
britain Price, Finkelberg and Shahar, Rome: An Empire of Many Nations: New Perspectives on Ethnic Diversity and Cultural Identity (2021) 193
care of sacred objects, appoint tresviri Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 299
care of sacred objects Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 299
censors, role in construction Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 299
cornelius tacitus Price, Finkelberg and Shahar, Rome: An Empire of Many Nations: New Perspectives on Ethnic Diversity and Cultural Identity (2021) 193
duumviri aedi dedicandae Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 299
egypt Rizzi, Hadrian and the Christians (2010) 120
ennius Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 40
eretria Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 40
fabius maximus, q. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 40, 299
fulvius nobilior, m., adorns the temple of hercules musarum Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 40
fulvius nobilior, m., conquers ambracia Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 40
fulvius nobilior, m., his triumph Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 40
gaul Price, Finkelberg and Shahar, Rome: An Empire of Many Nations: New Perspectives on Ethnic Diversity and Cultural Identity (2021) 193
greece Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 40
illyricum Price, Finkelberg and Shahar, Rome: An Empire of Many Nations: New Perspectives on Ethnic Diversity and Cultural Identity (2021) 193
iulium sidus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 40
janus Price, Finkelberg and Shahar, Rome: An Empire of Many Nations: New Perspectives on Ethnic Diversity and Cultural Identity (2021) 193
jerusalem Price, Finkelberg and Shahar, Rome: An Empire of Many Nations: New Perspectives on Ethnic Diversity and Cultural Identity (2021) 193
jerusalem (zion) Rizzi, Hadrian and the Christians (2010) 120
judaea Price, Finkelberg and Shahar, Rome: An Empire of Many Nations: New Perspectives on Ethnic Diversity and Cultural Identity (2021) 193
jupiter, capitolinus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 299
juvenal, roman poet Rizzi, Hadrian and the Christians (2010) 120
licinius lucullus, l. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 40
lucretius gallus, c. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 40
millar, fergus Price, Finkelberg and Shahar, Rome: An Empire of Many Nations: New Perspectives on Ethnic Diversity and Cultural Identity (2021) 193
mysians Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 40
nautii Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 299
nero, colossus of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 299
nero, roman emperor Rizzi, Hadrian and the Christians (2010) 120
nero Price, Finkelberg and Shahar, Rome: An Empire of Many Nations: New Perspectives on Ethnic Diversity and Cultural Identity (2021) 193
objects, restoration of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 299
objects, their public versus private context Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 40
otacilius crassus, t. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 299
perseus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 40
pertinax Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 40
plutarch, greek writer Rizzi, Hadrian and the Christians (2010) 120
polygnotus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 40
pompey the great Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 40
praxiteles, and the venus of cos Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 299
private versus public Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 40
pyrrhus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 40
quinctius flamininus, l. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 40
rome, temple of divus augustus, victoria in Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 40
rome, temple of hercules musarum Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 40
rome, temple of jupiter capitolinus, cult statue of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 299
rome, temple of mens Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 299
rome, temple of venus and rome Rizzi, Hadrian and the Christians (2010) 120
rome, temple of venus eryx Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 299
rome Rizzi, Hadrian and the Christians (2010) 120
septimius severus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 40
serapis, egyptian god Rizzi, Hadrian and the Christians (2010) 120
simulacrum versus signum, of wood Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 299
statuary, colossal Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 40
statuary, restoration of' Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 299
stertinius, l. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 40
tacitus, roman historian Rizzi, Hadrian and the Christians (2010) 120
terentius varro lucullus, m. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 40
tibur, hadrians villa, canopus Rizzi, Hadrian and the Christians (2010) 120
tibur, hadrians villa, piazza doro Rizzi, Hadrian and the Christians (2010) 120
tibur, hadrians villa, valle di tempe Rizzi, Hadrian and the Christians (2010) 120
tibur, hadrians villa Rizzi, Hadrian and the Christians (2010) 120
titus Price, Finkelberg and Shahar, Rome: An Empire of Many Nations: New Perspectives on Ethnic Diversity and Cultural Identity (2021) 193
trajan, roman emperor Rizzi, Hadrian and the Christians (2010) 120
verres, c. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 40
vespasian, patronizes artists Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 299
vespasian, roman emperor Rizzi, Hadrian and the Christians (2010) 120
vespasian Price, Finkelberg and Shahar, Rome: An Empire of Many Nations: New Perspectives on Ethnic Diversity and Cultural Identity (2021) 193
vopiscus flavius, roman historian Rizzi, Hadrian and the Christians (2010) 120